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Past Scientific Events

  1. Workshop Reimagining the Foundations of Algebraic Topology

    Organizers: Vigleik Angeltveit (Australian National University), Mark Behrens (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Julia Bergner (University of California), LEAD Andrew Blumberg (University of Texas)

    Recent innovations in higher category theory have unlocked the potential to reimagine the basic tools and constructions in algebraic topology. This workshop will explore the interplay between these higher and $\infty$-categorical techniques with classical algebraic topology, playing each off of the other and returning the field to conceptual, geometrical intuition.

    Updated on Apr 15, 2014 11:30 AM PDT
  2. Seminar MT Postdoc Seminar

    Created on Feb 06, 2014 09:21 AM PST
  3. Seminar MT Basics

    Created on Mar 21, 2014 02:26 PM PDT
  4. Seminar Conformal Field Theory

    Created on Feb 19, 2014 08:13 AM PST
  5. Seminar Bowen Lectures

    Created on Jul 22, 2013 02:42 PM PDT
  6. Seminar MT Postdoc Seminar

    Updated on Feb 07, 2014 03:51 PM PST
  7. Seminar Conformal Field Theory

    Created on Feb 19, 2014 08:07 AM PST
  8. Workshop Hot Topics: Perfectoid Spaces and their Applications

    Organizers: Sophie Morel (Princeton University), Peter Scholze (Universität Bonn), LEAD Richard Taylor (Institute for Advanced Study), Jared Weinstein (Boston University)

    Since their introduction just two years ago, perfectoid spaces have played a crucial role in a number of striking advances in arithmetic algebraic geometry: the proof of Deligne's weight-monodromy conjecture for complete intersections in toric varieties; the development of p-adic Hodge theory for rigid analytic spaces;  a p-adic analogue of Riemann's classification of abelian varieties over the complex numbers; and the construction of Galois representations for torsion classes in the cohomology of many locally symmetric spaces (for instance arithmetic hyperbolic 3-manifolds). We will start the week with an exposition of the foundations of the theory of perfectoid spaces, with the aim of teaching novices to work with them. Then we will discuss their current and potential applications.

    Updated on Mar 04, 2014 01:42 PM PST
  9. Seminar Five Minute Talks

    Updated on Feb 12, 2014 09:05 AM PST
  10. Workshop Connections for Women: Model Theory and Its Interactions with Number Theory and Arithmetic Geometry

    Organizers: Kirsten Eisentraeger (Pennsylvania State University), Julia Gordon (University of British Columbia), Deirdre Haskell (McMaster University)

    The development of model theory has always been influenced by its potential applications.
    Recent years have seen a remarkable flowering of that development, with many exciting applications of model theory in number theory and algebraic geometry. The introductory workshop will aim to increase these interactions by exposing the techniques of model theory to the number theorists and algebraic geometers, and the problems of number theory and algebraic geometry to the model theorists. The Connections for Women workshop will focus on presenting current research on the borders of these subjects, with particular emphasis on the contributions of women. In addition, there will be some social occasions to allow young women and men to make connections with established researchers, and a panel discussion addressing the challenges faced by all young researchers, but especially by women, in establishing a career in mathematics.

    Updated on Feb 12, 2014 09:59 AM PST
  11. Workshop Pacific Northwest and Bay Area Differential Geometry Seminar (BADGS) Winter 2014

    Organizers: David Bao (San Francisco State University), Joel Hass (University of California, Davis), David Hoffman (Stanford University), Rafe Mazzeo (Stanford University), Richard Montgomery (University of California, Santa Cruz)

    The seminar will take place from 10AM to 5PM on Saturday, and 9:15AM to 1PM on Sunday. Participants and their significant others are invited to a dinner to be arranged at a local restaurant on Saturday evening. The cost of the dinner will be reduced for students and postdocs. There is a signup link on the interactive program.

    Location:  Stanford University Department of Mathematics, Room 380C

    INTERACTIVE PROGRAM (PDF)

    Updated on Jan 16, 2014 04:46 PM PST
  12. Workshop Introductory Workshop: Model Theory, Arithmetic Geometry and Number Theory

    Organizers: Elisabeth Bouscaren (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS)), Antoine Chambert-Loir (Université Paris-Sud (Orsay)), LEAD Rahim Moosa (University of Waterloo)

    Model theory is a branch of mathematical logic whose structural techniques have proven to be remarkably useful in arithmetic geometry and number theory. We will introduce in this workshop some of the main themes of the program.

    In particular, we will be offering the following tutorials:
    1. An Introduction to Stability-Theoretic Techniques, by Pierre Simon.
    2. Model Theory and Diophantine Geometry, by Antoine Chambert-Loir, Ya'acov Peterzil, and  Anand Pillay.
    3. Valued Fields and Berkovich Spaces, by Deirdre Haskell and Martin Hils.
    4. Model Theory and Additive Combinatorics, by Lou van den Dries.

    In addition to the tutorials there will be several "state of the art" lectures on the program topics, indicating recent results as well as directions for future work. Speakers include Ekaterina Amerik, Ehud Hrushovski, Alice Medvedev, Terence Tao, and Margaret Thomas.

    The introductory workshop aims to familiarize graduate students, postdocs, and non-experts to major and new topics of the current program. Though the audience is expected to have a general mathematical background, knowledge of technical terminology and recent findings is not assumed.

    Updated on Feb 10, 2014 11:01 AM PST
  13. Workshop Introductory Workshop: Algebraic Topology

    Organizers: Teena Gerhardt (Michigan State University), Jesper Grodal (University of Copenhagen), Kathryn Hess (École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL)), LEAD Michael Hill (University of Virginia)

    Algebraic topology is a rich, vibrant field with close connections to many branches of mathematics. This workshop will describe the state of the field, focusing on major programs, open problems, exciting new tools, and cutting edge techniques.

    The introductory workshop serves as an overview to the overlying programmatic theme. It aims to familiarize graduate students, postdocs, and non-experts to major and new topics of the current program. Though the audience is expected to have a general mathematical background, knowledge of technical terminology and recent findings is not assumed.

    Updated on Jan 27, 2014 11:44 AM PST
  14. Workshop Connections for Women: Algebraic Topology

    Organizers: Julia Bergner (University of California), LEAD Teena Gerhardt (Michigan State University), Brooke Shipley (University of Illinois at Chicago)

    This two-day workshop will consist of short courses given by prominent female mathematicians in the field. These introductory courses will be appropriate for graduate students, post-docs, and researchers in related areas. The workshop will also include a panel discussion featuring successful women at various stages in their mathematical careers.

    Updated on Jan 21, 2014 01:08 PM PST
  15. Workshop Macaulay2 Workshop

    Organizers: Sonja Mapes (University of Notre Dame), Frank Moore (Wake Forest University), David Swinarski (University of Georgia)

    The purpose of the workshop is to bring Macaulay2 developers together with those who would like to share or develop their skills at writing packages for Macaulay2 and those interested in developing the corresponding mathematical algorithms.

    Updated on Aug 05, 2013 05:39 PM PDT
  16. Seminar Geroch Lunch Seminar

    Updated on Sep 16, 2013 02:56 PM PDT
  17. Workshop Infinite-Dimensional Geometry

    Organizers: Lawrence Evans (University of California, Berkeley), Dmitry Jakobson (McGill University), Robert McCann (University of Toronto), LEAD Stephen Preston (University of Colorado)

    The purpose of this workshop is to gather researchers working in various areas of geometry in infinite dimensions in order to facilitate collaborations and sharing of ideas. Topics represented include optimal transport and geometries on densities, metrics on shape spaces, Euler-Arnold equations on diffeomorphism groups, the universal Teichmuller space, geometry of random Riemann surfaces, metrics on spaces of metrics, and related areas. The workshop will be held on the campus of University of California Berkeley (60 Evans Hall) the weekend of December 7-8, 2013. It is funded by an NSF grant.

    Updated on Dec 05, 2013 02:55 PM PST
  18. Seminar Geroch Lunch Seminar

    Updated on Sep 16, 2013 02:56 PM PDT
  19. Seminar Geroch Lunch Seminar

    Updated on Sep 16, 2013 02:56 PM PDT
  20. Seminar OT Programmatic Seminar

    Created on Oct 11, 2013 09:57 AM PDT
  21. Seminar OT Programmatic Seminar

    Updated on Oct 10, 2013 04:41 PM PDT
  22. Workshop Initial Data and Evolution Problems in General Relativity

    Organizers: LEAD Piotr Chrusciel (Universität Wien), LEAD Igor Rodnianski (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

    This workshop discusses recent developments both in the study of the properties of initial data for Einstein's equations, and in the study of solutions of the Einstein evolution problem. Cosmic censorship, the formation and stability of black holes, the role of mass and quasi-local mass, and the construction of solutions of the Einstein constraint equations are focus problems for the workshop. We highlight recent developments, and examine major areas in which future progress is likely.

    Updated on Nov 26, 2013 09:16 AM PST
  23. Seminar Geroch Lunch Seminar

    Updated on Sep 16, 2013 02:55 PM PDT
  24. Seminar Constraint FRG

    Created on Nov 06, 2013 01:31 PM PST
  25. Seminar Geroch Lunch Seminar

    Updated on Oct 22, 2013 03:03 PM PDT
  26. Seminar Chern Lectures

    Created on Jul 22, 2013 02:41 PM PDT
  27. Seminar Geroch Lunch Seminar

    Updated on Sep 16, 2013 02:54 PM PDT
  28. Seminar Geroch Lunch Seminar

    Updated on Sep 16, 2013 02:54 PM PDT
  29. Workshop Bay Area Differential Geometry Seminar (BADGS) Fall 2013

    Organizers: David Bao (San Francisco State University), Joel Hass (University of California, Davis), LEAD David Hoffman (Stanford University), Rafe Mazzeo (Stanford University), Richard Montgomery (University of California, Santa Cruz)

    The Bay Area Differential Geometry Seminar meets 3 times each year and is a 1-day seminar on recent developments in differential geometry and geometric analysis, broadly interpreted. Typically, it runs from mid-morning until late afternoon, with 3-4 speakers. Lunch will be available and the final talk will be followed by dinner.

    Updated on Sep 18, 2013 12:07 PM PDT
  30. Seminar Geroch Lunch Seminar

    Updated on Sep 16, 2013 02:53 PM PDT
  31. Workshop Fluid Mechanics, Hamiltonian Dynamics, and Numerical Aspects of Optimal Transportation

    Organizers: Yann Brenier (École Polytechnique), Michael Cullen (Met Office), LEAD Wilfrid Gangbo (Georgia Institute of Technology), Allen Tannenbaum (SUNY)

    The workshop will be devoted to emerging approaches to fluid mechanical, geophysical and kinetic theoretical flows based on optimal transportation. It will also explore numerical approaches to optimal transportation problems.

    Updated on Nov 05, 2013 12:34 PM PST
  32. Seminar Geroch Lunch Seminar

    Updated on Sep 16, 2013 02:53 PM PDT
  33. Seminar Geroch Lunch Seminar

    Updated on Sep 16, 2013 02:52 PM PDT
  34. Seminar Geroch Lunch Seminar

    Updated on Sep 16, 2013 02:52 PM PDT
  35. Seminar Geroch Lunch Seminar

    Updated on Sep 16, 2013 02:51 PM PDT
  36. Seminar 5 Minute Talks

    Created on Sep 06, 2013 09:50 AM PDT
  37. Seminar Chancellor's Lecture - Topics in Analysis: Hidden convexity in nonlinear PDES

    Several examples of hidden convexity in nonlinear PDEs will be addressed. Most of them are related to the theory of “optimal transportation”, which is the theme of one of the two MSRI programs this fall: see http://www.msri.org/programs/277.

    Updated on Sep 10, 2013 11:00 AM PDT
  38. Seminar Chancellor's Lecture - Topics in Analysis: Hidden convexity in nonlinear PDES

    Several examples of hidden convexity in nonlinear PDEs will be addressed. Most of them are related to the theory of “optimal transportation”, which is the theme of one of the two MSRI programs this fall: see http://www.msri.org/programs/277.

    Updated on Sep 10, 2013 10:59 AM PDT
  39. Workshop Introductory Workshop: Mathematical Relativity

    Organizers: LEAD Justin Corvino (Lafayette College), Greg Galloway (University of Miami), Hans Ringström (Royal Institute of Technology (KTH))

    Mathematical relativity is a very widely ranging area of mathematical study, spanning differential geometry, elliptic and hyperbolic PDE, and dynamical systems. We introduce in this workshop some of the leading areas of current interest associated with problems in cosmology, the theory of black holes, and the geometry and physics of the Cauchy problem (initial data constraints and evolution) for the Einstein equations.

    The introductory workshop serves as an overview to the overlying programmatic theme. It aims to familiarize graduate students, postdocs, and non-experts to major and new topics of the current program. Though the audience is expected to have a general mathematical background, knowledge of technical terminology and recent findings is not assumed.

    Updated on Oct 23, 2013 10:04 AM PDT
  40. Seminar Chancellor's Lecture - Topics in Analysis: Hidden convexity in nonlinear PDES

    Several examples of hidden convexity in nonlinear PDEs will be addressed. Most of them are related to the theory of “optimal transportation”, which is the theme of one of the two MSRI programs this fall: see http://www.msri.org/programs/277.

    Updated on Sep 06, 2013 09:47 AM PDT
  41. Seminar Chancellor's Lecture - Topics in Analysis: Hidden convexity in nonlinear PDES

    Several examples of hidden convexity in nonlinear PDEs will be addressed. Most of them are related to the theory of “optimal transportation”, which is the theme of one of the two MSRI programs this fall: see http://www.msri.org/programs/277.

    Updated on Sep 06, 2013 09:46 AM PDT
  42. Workshop Connections for Women: Mathematical General Relativity

    Organizers: Beverly Berger (None), LEAD Lydia Bieri (University of Michigan), Iva Stavrov (Lewis and Clark College)

    Ever since the epic work of Yvonne Choquet-Bruhat on the well-posedness of Einstein's equations initiated the mathematical study of general relativity, women have played an important role in many areas of mathematical relativity. In this workshop, some of the leading women researchers in mathematical relativity present their work.

    Updated on Oct 23, 2013 10:03 AM PDT
  43. Workshop Introductory Workshop on Optimal Transport: Geometry and Dynamics

    Organizers: Luigi Ambrosio (Scuola Normale Superiore), Lawrence Evans (University of California, Berkeley), LEAD Alessio Figalli (University of Texas)

    The workshop is intended to give an overview of the research landscape surrounding optimal transportation, including its connections to geometry, design applications, and fully nonlinear partial differential equations.

    As such, it will feature some survey lectures or minicourses by distinguished visitors and/or a few of the organizers of the theme semester, amounting to a kind of summer school. These will be complemented by a sampling of research lectures and short presentations from a spectrum of invited guests and other participants, including some who attended the previous week's {\em Connections for Women} workshop.

    The introductory workshop aims to familiarize graduate students, postdocs, and non-experts to major and new topics of the current program. Though the audience is expected to have a general mathematical background, knowledge of technical terminology and recent findings is not assumed.

    Updated on Oct 23, 2013 10:02 AM PDT
  44. Workshop Connections for Women on Optimal Transport: Geometry and Dynamics

    Organizers: Sun-Yung Alice Chang (Princeton University), Panagiota Daskalopoulos (Columbia University), Robert McCann (University of Toronto), Maria Westdickenberg (RWTH Aachen)

    This two-day event aims to connect women graduate students and beginning researchers with more established female researchers who use optimal transportation in their work and can serve as professional contacts and potential role-models. As such, it will showcase a selection of lectures featuring female scientists, both established leaders and emerging researchers.

    These lectures will be interspersed with networking and social events such as lunch or tea-time discussions led by successful researchers about (a) the particular opportunities and challenges facing women in science---including practical topics such as work-life balance and choosing a mentor, and (b) promising new directions in optimal transportation and related topics. Junior participants will be paired with more senior researchers in mentoring groups, and all participants will be encouraged to stay for the Introductory Workshop the following week, where they will have the opportunity to propose a short research communication.

    Updated on Oct 02, 2013 08:49 AM PDT
  45. Program Mathematical General Relativity

    Organizers: Yvonne Choquet-Bruhat, Piotr Chrusciel (Universität Wien), Greg Galloway (University of Miami), Gerhard Huisken (Mathematisches Forschungsinstitut Oberwolfach), LEAD James Isenberg (University of Oregon), Sergiu Klainerman (Princeton University), Igor Rodnianski (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Richard Schoen (Stanford University)

    The study of Einstein's general relativistic gravitational field equation, which has for many years played a crucial role in the modeling of physical cosmology and astrophysical phenomena, is increasingly a source for interesting and challenging problems in geometric analysis and PDE. In nonlinear hyperbolic PDE theory, the problem of determining if the Kerr black hole is stable has sparked a flurry of activity, leading to outstanding progress in the study of scattering and asymptotic behavior of solutions of wave equations on black hole backgrounds. The spectacular recent results of Christodoulou on trapped surface formation have likewise stimulated important advances in hyperbolic PDE. At the same time, the study of initial data for Einstein's equation has generated a wide variety of challenging problems in Riemannian geometry and elliptic PDE theory. These include issues, such as the Penrose inequality, related to the asymptotically defined mass of an astrophysical systems, as well as questions concerning the construction of non constant mean curvature solutions of the Einstein constraint equations. This semester-long program aims to bring together researchers working in mathematical relativity, differential geometry, and PDE who wish to explore this rapidly growing area of mathematics.

    Updated on Nov 05, 2013 04:41 PM PST
  46. Program Optimal Transport: Geometry and Dynamics

    Organizers: Luigi Ambrosio (Scuola Normale Superiore), Yann Brenier (École Polytechnique), Panagiota Daskalopoulos (Columbia University), Lawrence Evans (University of California, Berkeley), Alessio Figalli (University of Texas), Wilfrid Gangbo (Georgia Institute of Technology), LEAD Robert McCann (University of Toronto), Felix Otto (Max-Planck-Institut für Mathematik in den Naturwissenschaften), Neil Trudinger (Australian National University)

    In the past two decades, the theory of optimal transportation has emerged as a fertile field of inquiry, and a diverse tool for exploring applications within and beyond mathematics. This transformation occurred partly because long-standing issues could finally be resolved, but also because unexpected connections emerged which linked these questions to classical problems in geometry, partial differential equations, nonlinear dynamics, natural sciences, design problems and economics. The aim of this program will be to gather experts in optimal transport and areas of potential application to catalyze new investigations, disseminate progress, and invigorate ongoing exploration.

    Updated on Sep 29, 2013 11:41 PM PDT
  47. Summer Graduate School Introduction to the Mathematics of Seismic Imaging

    Organizers: LEAD Gunther Uhlmann (University of Washington)

    In this two week program we will develop some of the mathematical foundations of seismic imaging that is a basic tool used in ``Imaging the Earth Interior". This is one of the components of the Mathematics of Planet Earth year in 2013.

    The goal in seismic imaging is to determine the inner structure of the Earth from the crust to the inner core by using information provided by earthquakes in the case of the deep interior or by measuring the reflection of waves produced by acoustic or elastic sources on the surface of the Earth. The mathematics of seismic imaging involves solving inverse problems for the wave equation. No previous experience on inverse problems will be assumed.

    Updated on Jul 25, 2013 09:45 AM PDT
  48. Summer Graduate School New Geometric Techniques in Number Theory

    Organizers: Toby Gee (Imperial College, London), LEAD Ariane Mezard (Institut de Mathématiques de Jussieu), David Nadler (University of California, Berkeley), Peter Scholze (Universität Bonn)

    The branches of number theory most directly related to automorphic forms have seen enormous progress over the past five years. Techniques introduced since 2008 have made it possible to prove many new arithmetic applications. The purpose of the current workshop is to drow the attention of young students or researchers to new questions that have arisen in the course of bringing several chapters in the Langlands program and related algebraic number theory to a close. We will focus especially on some precise questions of a geometric nature, or whose solutions seem to require new geometric insights. A graduate level in Number Theory is expected.

    This two-week workshop will be devoted to the following subjects: Automorphy lifting theorems, p-adic local Langlands program, Characters of categorical representations and Hasse-Weil zeta function. During the first week, the lecturers present an open question and related mathematical objects. The first exercice sessions serve to direct the participants to an appropriate subject depending on their level. During the second week, the lecturers give some more advanced lectures on the field.

    Updated on Jul 02, 2013 10:48 AM PDT
  49. Summer Graduate School IAS/PCMI Summer 2013: Geometric Analysis

    Organizers: Hubert Bray (Duke University), Greg Galloway (University of Miami), Rafe Mazzeo (Stanford University), Natasa Sesum (Rutgers University)

    This Summer Graduate Workshop will be held in Park City, Utah.

    The Graduate Summer School bridges the gap between a general graduate education in mathematics and the specific preparation necessary to do research on problems of current interest. In general, these students will have completed their first year, and in some cases, may already be working on a thesis. While a majority of the participants will be graduate students, some postdoctoral scholars and researchers may also be interested in attending.

    We strongly recommend that graduate students have already had the equivalent of rigorous first year graduate-level courses in topology, algebra and analysis.

    The main activity of the Graduate Summer School will be a set of intensive short lectures offered by leaders in the field, designed to introduce students to exciting, current research in mathematics. These lectures will not duplicate standard courses available elsewhere. Each course will consist of lectures with problem sessions. Course assistants will be available for each lecture series. The participants of the Graduate Summer School meet three times each day for lectures, with one or two problem sessions scheduled each day as well.

    Updated on May 06, 2013 11:06 AM PDT
  50. Summer Graduate School Seminaire de Mathematiques Superieures 2013: Physics and Mathematics of Link Homology

    Organizers: Sergei Gukov (California Institute of Technology), Mikhail Khovanov (Columbia University), Johannes Walcher (McGill University)

    This Summer Graduate Workshop will be held in Montreal, Canada.

    Homology theories of knots and links is a burgeoning field at the interface of mathematics with theoretical physics. The 2013 edition of the SMS will bring together leading researchers in mathematics and mathematical physics working in this area, with the aim to educate a new generation of scientists in this exciting subject. The school will provide a pedagogical review of the current state of the various constructions of knot homologies, and also encourage interactions between the communities in order to facilitate development of the unified picture.

    Updated on May 06, 2013 09:37 AM PDT
  51. Workshop Pacific Rim Mathematical Association (PRIMA) Congress 2013

    Organizers: Alejandro Adem (University of British Columbia), Federico Ardila (San Francisco State University), Marston Conder (University of Auckland), David Eisenbud (MSRI - Mathematical Sciences Research Institute), Yakov Eliashberg (Stanford University), Nassif Ghoussoub (University of British Columbia), Anthony Guttmann (University of Melbourne), Lee Minh Ha, Shi Jin (University of Wisconsin), Alejandro Jofre, Yujiro Kawamata (University of Tokyo), Jong Keum (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST)), Douglas Lind (University of Washington), Kyewon Park (Ajou University), Shige Peng (Shandong University), Jose Seade (UNAM - Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico), Gang Tian (Princeton University), Tatiana Toro (University of Washington)

    The Second Pacific Rim Mathematical Association (PRIMA) Congress will be held at Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China, on June 24-28, 2013.

    PRIMA is an association of mathematical sciences institutes, departments and societies from around the Pacific Rim, established in 2005 with the aim of promoting and facilitating the development of the mathematical sciences throughout the Pacific Rim region.

    $1000 travel grants are available to representatives from MSRI Academic Sponsoring Institutions. These grants are available on a first-come, first-serve basis.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Additional Travel Support Available from an NSF Grant

    The NSF has awarded a substantial grant for travel by scientists at US universities to the PRIMA Congress in Shanghai. For further information and application details, please see https://www.mathprograms.org/db/programs/152

    Updated on May 06, 2013 12:00 PM PDT
  52. Summer Graduate School Algebraic Topology

    Organizers: Andrew Blumberg (University of Texas), Teena Gerhardt (Michigan State University), LEAD Michael Hill (University of Virginia)

    Modern algebraic topology is a broad and vibrant field which has seen recent progress on classical problems as well as exciting new interactions with applied mathematics. This summer school will consist of a series of lecture by experts on major research directions, including several lectures on applied algebraic topology. Participants will also have the opportunity to have guided interaction with the seminal texts in the field, reading and speaking about the foundational papers.

    Updated on Jun 25, 2013 08:38 PM PDT
  53. MSRI-UP MSRI-UP 2013: Algebraic Combinatorics

    Organizers: Duane Cooper (Morehouse College), Ricardo Cortez (Tulane University), Herbert Medina (Loyola Marymount University), LEAD Ivelisse M. Rubio (University of Puerto Rico), Suzanne Weekes (Worcester Polytechnic Institute)

    The MSRI-UP summer program is designed for undergraduate students who have completed two years of university-level mathematics courses and would like to conduct research in the mathematical sciences. Due to funding restrictions, only U.S. citizens and permanent residents are eligible to apply and the program cannot accept foreign students regardless of funding. The academic portion of the 2013 program will be led by Dr. Rosa Orellana from Dartmouth College.

    Updated on Aug 15, 2013 08:52 AM PDT
  54. Workshop Bay Area Differential Geometry Seminar (BADGS) Spring 2013

    Organizers: David Bao (San Francisco State University), Robert Bryant (Duke University), Joel Hass (University of California, Davis), David Hoffman (Stanford University), Rafe Mazzeo (Stanford University), Richard Montgomery (University of California, Santa Cruz)

    The Bay Area Differential Geometry Seminar meets 3 times each year and is a 1-day seminar on recent developments in differential geometry and geometric analysis, broadly interpreted. Typically, it runs from mid-morning until late afternoon, with 3-4 speakers. Lunch will be available and the final talk will be followed by dinner.

    Location: Department of Mathematics, Stanford University

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 03:09 PM PDT
  55. Workshop The Commutative Algebra of Singularities in Birational Geometry: Multiplier Ideals, Jets, Valuations, and Positive Characteristic Methods

    Organizers: Craig Huneke (University of Virginia), Yujiro Kawamata (University of Tokyo), Mircea Mustata (University of Michigan), Karen Smith (University of Michigan), Kei-ichi Watanabe (Nihon University)

    The workshop will examine the interplay between measures of singularities coming both from characteristic p methods of commutative algebra, and invariants of singularities coming from birational algebraic geometry. There is a long history of this interaction which arises via the "reduction to characteristic p" procedure. It is only in the last few years, however, that very concrete objects from both areas, namely generalized test ideals from commutative algebra and multiplier ideals from birational geometry, have been shown to be intimately connected. This workshop will explore this connection, as well as other topics used to study singularities such as jets schemes and valuations.

    Updated on Jun 05, 2013 09:44 AM PDT
  56. Workshop Interactions between Noncommutative Algebra, Representation Theory, and Algebraic Geometry

    Organizers: Victor Ginzburg (University of Chicago), Iain Gordon (University of Edinburgh, UK), Markus Reineke (Bergische Universität Wuppertal, Germany), Catharina Stroppel* (University of Bonn, Germany), and James Zhang (University of Washington)

    In recent years there have been increasing interactions between noncommutative algebra/representation theory on the one hand and algebraic geometry on the other. This workshop would aim to examine these interactions and, as importantly, to encourage the interactions between the three areas. The precise topics will become more precise nearer the time, but will certainly include:

    Noncommutative algebraic geometry; Noncommutative resolutions of singularities and Calabi-Yau algebras; Symplectic reflection and related algebras; D-module theory; Deformation-quantization
     

    Updated on May 14, 2013 12:12 PM PDT
  57. Seminar Superduality

    Updated on May 23, 2013 12:44 PM PDT
  58. Workshop Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2013: Assessment of Mathematical Proficiencies in the Age of the Common Core

    Organizers: Mark Thames* (University of Michigan), Kristin Umland* (University of New Mexico), Noah Heller (Math for America) and Alan Schoenfeld (University of California, Berkeley)

    This workshop will explore the fundamental problems of trying to assess students' mathematical proficiency, seeking to take a more comprehensive perspective on what it is to learn, know, and use mathematics. The advent of the Common Core State Standards both increases the demand and broadens the conception of what it is to be mathematically skillful, and opens new opportunities and challenges to improving our ability to assess what students understand and can do.

    Updated on Sep 09, 2013 09:31 PM PDT
  59. Workshop Hot Topics: Surface subgroups and cube complexes

    Organizers: Ian Agol* (University of California, Berkeley), Danny Calegari (University of Chicago), Ursula Hamenstädt (University Bonn), Vlad Markovic (California Institute of Technology)

    Recently there has been substantial progress in our understanding of the related questions of which hyperbolic groups are cubulated on the one hand, and which contain a surface subgroup on the other. The most spectacular combination of these two ideas has been in 3-manifold topology, which has seen the resolution of many long-standing conjectures. In turn, the resolution of these conjectures has led to a new point of view in geometric group theory, and the introduction of powerful new tools and structures. The goal of this conference will be to explore the further potential of these new tools and perspectives, and to encourage communication between researchers working in various related fields.

    Updated on Jun 06, 2013 05:54 PM PDT
  60. Workshop AWM Research Symposium 2013

    Organizers: Hélène Barcelo (MSRI), Estelle Basor (AIM), Georgia Benkart (University of Wisconsin-Madison), Ruth Charney (Brandeis University), Frank Farris (Santa Clara University), Jill Pipher (Brown University and ICERM)

    AWM launches a New Series of Biennial Research Symposia

    AWM Research Symposium 2013 will be held at Santa Clara University March 16 -17, 2013. The symposium, the initial event in the series, will showcase the research of women in the mathematical professions. It will feature three plenary talks, special sessions on a broad range of research in pure and applied mathematics, poster sessions for graduate students, and a panel discussion of the "imposter syndrome." Join us next spring on the Santa Clara University campus.

    Updated on Jun 06, 2013 05:54 PM PDT
  61. Seminar Categorification

    Updated on Nov 26, 2013 03:46 PM PST
  62. Workshop Representation Theory, Homological Algebra, and Free Resolutions

    Organizers: Luchezar Avramov (University of Nebraska), David Eisenbud (University of California, Berkeley), and Irena Peeva* (Cornell University)

    The workshop will focus on recent breakthroughs in understanding and applications of free resolutions and on interactions of commutative algebra and representation theory, where algebraic geometry often appears as a third player. A specific goal is to stimulate further interaction between these fields.

    Updated on Apr 22, 2014 12:18 PM PDT
  63. Workshop Introductory Workshop: Noncommutative Algebraic Geometry and Representation Theory

    Organizers: Michael Artin (Massachusetts Institute of Technology - MIT), Michel Van den Bergh* (Vrije Universiteit Brussel), and Toby Stafford (University of Manchester)

    This workshop will provide several short lecture series consisting two or three lectures each to introduce postdocs, graduate students and non-experts to some of the major themes of the conference. While the precise topics may change to reflect developments in the area, it is likely that we will run mini-series in the following subjects:

    Noncommutative algebraic geometry; D-Module Theory; Derived Categories; Noncommutative Resolutions of Singularities; Deformation-Quantization; Symplectic Reflection Algebras; Growth Functions of Infinite Dimensional Algebras.

    Updated on Jan 08, 2014 04:52 PM PST
  64. Workshop Connections for Women: Noncommutative Algebraic Geometry and Representation Theory

    Organizers: Georgia Benkart (University of Wisconsin), Ellen Kirkman* (Wake Forest University), and Susan Sierra (Princeton University & University of Edinburgh)

    The Connections for Women workshop associated to the MSRI program in noncommutative algebraic geometry and representation theory is intended to bring together women who are working in these areas in all stages of their careers.

    As the first event in the semester, this workshop will feature a "tapas menu" of current research and open questions: light but intriguing tastes, designed to encourage further exploration and interest. Talks will be aimed at a fairly general audience and will cover diverse topics within the theme of the program. In addition, there will be a poster session for graduate students and recent PhD recipients and a panel discussion on career issues, as well as free time for informal discussion.

    Updated on Apr 09, 2014 03:05 AM PDT
  65. Seminar 5-minute talks

    Updated on Jan 18, 2013 05:59 AM PST
  66. Program Noncommutative Algebraic Geometry and Representation Theory

    Organizers: Mike Artin (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Viktor Ginzburg (University of Chicago), Catharina Stroppel (Universität Bonn , Germany), Toby Stafford* (University of Manchester, United Kingdom), Michel Van den Bergh (Universiteit Hasselt, Belgium), Efim Zelmanov (University of California, San Diego)

    Over the last few decades noncommutative algebraic geometry (in its many forms) has become increasingly important, both within noncommutative algebra/representation theory, as well as having significant applications to algebraic geometry and other neighbouring areas. The goal of this program is to explore and expand upon these subjects and their interactions. Topics of particular interest include noncommutative projective algebraic geometry, noncommutative resolutions of (commutative or noncommutative) singularities,Calabi-Yau algebras, deformation theory and Poisson structures, as well as the interplay of these subjects with the algebras appearing in representation theory--like enveloping algebras, symplectic reflection algebras and the many guises of Hecke algebras.

    Updated on May 06, 2013 04:21 PM PDT
  67. Workshop Combinatorial Commutative Algebra and Applications

    Organizers: Winfried Bruns (Universität Osnabrück), Alicia Dickenstein (University of Buenos Aires, Argentina), Takayuki Hibi (Osaka University), Allen Knutson* (Cornell University), and Bernd Sturmfels (University of California, Berkeley)

    This workshop on Combinatorial Commutative Algebra aims to bring together researchers studying toric algebra and degenerations, simplicial objects such as monomial ideals and Stanley-Reisner rings, and their connections to tropical geometry, algebraic statistics, Hilbert schemes, D-modules, and hypergeometric functions.

    Updated on Apr 22, 2014 12:18 PM PDT
  68. Seminar Tropical Moduli Spaces

    Updated on Oct 18, 2012 11:07 AM PDT
  69. Seminar Matroids over rings

    Updated on Nov 07, 2012 11:39 AM PST
  70. Seminar Glicci ideals

    Updated on Nov 09, 2012 02:11 AM PST
  71. Seminar Tensor complexes

    Updated on Sep 16, 2013 10:17 AM PDT
  72. Seminar Relations of minors

    Updated on Sep 18, 2013 02:22 PM PDT
  73. Workshop Cluster Algebras in Combinatorics, Algebra, and Geometry

    Organizers: Claire Amiot (Université de Strasbourg), Sergey Fomin (University of Michigan), Bernard Leclerc (Université de Caen), and Andrei Zelevinsky* (Northeastern University)

    Cluster algebras provide a unifying algebraic/combinatorial framework for a wide variety of phenomena in settings as diverse as quiver representations, Teichmuller theory, Poisson geometry, Lie theory, discrete integrable systems, and polyhedral combinatorics.

    The workshop aims at presenting a broad view of the state-of-the-art understanding of the role of cluster algebras in all these areas, and their interactions with each other.

    Updated on Feb 15, 2014 09:13 AM PST
  74. Seminar The pentagram map

    Updated on Oct 19, 2012 04:42 AM PDT
  75. Seminar Dilogarithms

    Updated on Oct 05, 2012 05:36 AM PDT
  76. Seminar Superflatness

    Updated on Oct 03, 2012 02:18 AM PDT
  77. Seminar Linkage of ideals.

    Updated on Sep 25, 2012 03:09 AM PDT
  78. Seminar Mustafin Varieties

    Updated on Sep 11, 2013 10:37 AM PDT
  79. Seminar 5-minute talks

    Updated on Aug 30, 2012 04:56 AM PDT
  80. Seminar 5-minute talks

    Updated on Aug 30, 2012 04:57 AM PDT
  81. Workshop Joint Introductory Workshop: Cluster Algebras and Commutative Algebra

    Organizers: David Eisenbud* (University of California, Berkeley), Bernhard Keller (Universit´e Paris VII, France), Karen Smith (University of Michigan), and Alexander Vainshtein* (University of Haifa, Israel)

    This workshop will take place at the opening of the MSRI special programs on Commutative Algebra and on Cluster Algebras. It will feature lecture series at different levels, to appeal to a wide variety of participants. There will be minicourses on the basics of cluster algebras, and others developing particular aspects of cluster algebras and commutative algebra.

    Updated on Apr 22, 2014 12:18 PM PDT
  82. Workshop Connections For Women: Joint Workshop on Commutative Algebra and Cluster Algebras

    Organizers: Claudia Polini (University of Notre Dame), Idun Reiten (Norwegian University of Science and Technology), Karen Smith (University of Michigan), and Lauren Williams* (University of California, Berkeley)

    This workshop will present basic notions from Commutative Algebra and Cluster Algebras, with a particular focus on providing background material. Additionally, the workshop aims to encourage and facilitate the exchange of ideas between researchers in Commutative Algebra and researchers in Cluster Algebras.

    Updated on Sep 13, 2013 10:37 AM PDT
  83. Program Cluster Algebras

    Organizers: Sergey Fomin (University of Michigan), Bernhard Keller (Université Paris Diderot - Paris 7, France), Bernard Leclerc (Université de Caen Basse-Normandie, France), Alexander Vainshtein* (University of Haifa, Israel), Lauren Williams (University of California, Berkeley)

    Cluster algebras were conceived in the Spring of 2000 as a tool for studying dual canonical bases and total positivity in semisimple Lie groups. They are constructively defined commutative algebras with a distinguished set of generators (cluster variables) grouped into overlapping subsets (clusters) of fixed cardinality. Both the generators and the relations among them are not given from the outset, but are produced by an iterative process of successive mutations. Although this procedure appears counter-intuitive at first, it turns out to encode a surprisingly widespread range of phenomena, which might explain the explosive development of the subject in recent years.

    Cluster algebras provide a unifying algebraic/combinatorial framework for a wide variety of phenomena in settings as diverse as quiver representations, Teichmueller theory, invariant theory, tropical calculus, Poisson geometry, Lie theory, and polyhedral combinatorics.

    Updated on May 06, 2013 04:25 PM PDT
  84. Program Commutative Algebra

    Organizers: David Eisenbud* (University of California, Berkeley), Srikanth Iyengar (University of Nebraska), Ezra Miller (Duke University), Anurag Singh (University of Utah), and Karen Smith (University of Michigan)

    Commutative algebra was born in the 19th century from algebraic geometry, invariant theory, and number theory. Today it is a mature field with activity on many fronts.

    The year-long program will highlight exciting recent developments in core areas such as free resolutions, homological and representation theoretic aspects, Rees algebras and integral closure, tight closure and singularities, and birational geometry. In addition, it will feature the important links to other areas such as algebraic topology, combinatorics, mathematical physics, noncommutative geometry, representation theory, singularity theory, and statistics. The program will reflect the wealth of interconnections suggested by these fields, and will introduce young researchers to these diverse areas.

    New connections will be fostered through collaboration with the concurrent MSRI programs in Cluster Algebras (Fall 2012) and Noncommutative Algebraic Geometry and Representation Theory (Spring 2013).

    For more detailed information about the program please see, http://www.math.utah.edu/ca/.

    Updated on Aug 18, 2013 04:09 PM PDT
  85. Summer Graduate School Model Theory

    Organizers: David Marker* (University of Illinois, Chicago), Thomas Scanlon (University of California, Berkeley), Carol Wood (Wesleyan University).

    The workshop will consist of two minicourses, together with a selection of topical lectures.

    In the model theory course, o-minimality, and specifically the concrete example of the semi-algebraic sets of real numbers will provide the setting in which we introduce various fundamental results from model theory.
    The algebraic dynamics course will allow the introduction of concepts and proof techniques from number theory and algebraic geometry in the context of applications involving model theory.

    Toward the end of the workshop, the two minicourses will converge on the Pila-Wilkie theorem concerning points on analytic varieties, a result crucial in recent applications of o-minimality to diophantine geometry.

    Updated on Apr 22, 2014 05:02 PM PDT
  86. Summer Graduate School Mathematical General Relativity

    Organizers: Justin Corvino* (Lafayette College) and Pengzi Miao (University of Miami)

    Mathematical general relativity is the study of mathematical problems related to Einstein's theory of gravitation. There are interesting connections between the physical theory and problems in differential geometry and partial differential equations.

    The purpose of the workshop is to introduce graduate students to some fundamental aspects of mathematical general relativity, with particular emphasis on the geometry of the Einstein constraint equations and the Positive Mass Theorem. These topics will comprise a component of the upcoming semester program at MSRI in Fall 2013.

    There will be mini-courses, as well as several research lectures. Students are expected to have had courses in graduate real analysis and Riemannian geometry, while a course in graduate-level partial differential equations is recommended.

    Updated on Nov 25, 2013 02:55 PM PST
  87. Summer Graduate School IAS/PCMI Summer 2012: Geometric Group Theory

    Organizers: Mladen Bestvina (University of Utah), Michah Sageev (Technion – Israel Institute of Technology), and Karen Vogtmann (Cornell University)

    This Summer Graduate Workshop will be held in Park City, Utah.

    Some mobility between the Research in Mathematics and Graduate Summer School programs is expected and encouraged, but interested candidates should read the guidelines carefully and apply to the one program best suited to their field of study and experience. Postdoctoral scholars who are working in the field of Geometric Group Theory should apply to the Research Program in Mathematics, not to the Graduate Summer School.
    Graduate students who are beyond their basic courses and recent PhDs in all fields of mathematics are encouraged to apply to the Graduate Summer School. Funding will go primarily to graduate students. Postdoctoral scholars not working in the field of Geometric Group Theory should also apply, but should be within four years of receipt of their PhD.
    Deadline for submission of applications is January 31, 2012. Supplemental materials (such as Reference Letters) must be received in the PCMI office by February 4, 2012. Please plan accordingly. (Late applications may be accepted at the discretion of the organizers.) Response may be expected in early April. Financial support is available. Applicants are invited to request financial support by checking the appropriate boxes on the application form.

    Updated on Mar 20, 2012 11:44 AM PDT
  88. Summer Graduate School Seminaire de Mathematiques Superieures 2012: Probabilistic Combinatorics

    Organizers: Louigi Addario-Berry* (McGill University), Luc Devroye (McGill University), Bruce Reed (McGill University)

    This Summer Graduate Workshop will be held in Montreal, Canada.

    One of the cornerstones of the probabilistic approach to solving combinatorial problems is the following guiding principle: information about global structure can be obtained through local analysis. This principle is ubiquitous in probabilistic combinatorics. It arises in problems ranging from graph colouring, to Markov chain mixing times, to Szemerédi's regularity lemma and its applications, to the theory of influences. The 2012 Séminaire de Mathématiques Supérieures brings together experts in probabilistic combinatorics from around the world, to explain cutting edge research which in one way or another exhibits this principle.

    Updated on May 07, 2013 11:14 PM PDT
  89. Summer Graduate School Noncommutative Algebraic Geometry

    Organizers: Dan Rogalski* (University of California, San Diego), Travis Schedler (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Michael Wemyss (The University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom)

    This workshop will introduce some of the major themes of the MSRI program "Interactions between Noncommutative Algebra, Representation Theory, and Algebraic Geometry" to be held in the spring of 2013. There will be four mini-courses on the topics of noncommutative projective geometry, deformation theory, noncommutative resolutions of singularities, and symplectic reflection algebras. As well as providing theoretical background, the workshop will aim to equip participants with some intuition for the many open problems in this area through worked examples and experimental computer calculations.

    Updated on Sep 12, 2013 10:50 AM PDT
  90. Seminar Open Problems Seminar

    Updated on Jan 27, 2012 02:40 AM PST
  91. Seminar Open Problems Seminar

    Updated on Jan 27, 2012 02:39 AM PST
  92. Workshop Random Walks and Random Media

    Organizers: Noam Berger (The Hebrew University of Jerusalem), Nina Gantert (Technical University, Munich), Andrea Montanari (Stanford University), Alain-Sol Sznitman (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, ETH Zurich), and Ofer Zeitouni* (University of Minnesota/Weizmann Institute)

    The field of random media has been the object of intensive mathematical research over the last thirty years. It covers a variety of models, mainly from condensed matter physics, physical chemistry, and geology, where one is interested in materials which have defects or inhomogeneities. These features are taken into account by letting the medium be random. It has been found that this randomness can cause very unexpected effects in the large scale behavior of these models; on occasion these run contrary to the prevailing intuition. A feature of this area, which it has in common with other areas of statistical physics, is that what was initially thought to be just a simple toy model has turned out to be a major mathematical challenge.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 03:09 PM PDT
  93. Seminar Open Problems Seminar

    Updated on Jan 27, 2012 02:39 AM PST
  94. Seminar Self-Avoiding Walk

    Updated on Jan 31, 2014 11:36 AM PST
  95. Seminar Open Problems Seminar

    Updated on Jan 27, 2012 02:38 AM PST
  96. Seminar Postdoc Seminar

    Updated on Feb 01, 2012 07:47 AM PST
  97. Seminar Open Problems Seminar

    Updated on Jan 27, 2012 02:38 AM PST
  98. Seminar Open Problems Seminar

    Updated on Jan 27, 2012 02:37 AM PST
  99. Workshop Statistical Mechanics and Conformal Invariance

    Organizers: Philippe Di Francesco* (Commissariat à l' Énergie Atomique, CEA), Andrei Okounkov (Columbia University), Steffen Rohde (University of Washington ), and Scott Sheffield (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MIT)

    Our understanding of the scaling limits of discrete statistical systems has shifted in recent years from the physicists' field-theoretical approaches to the more rigorous realm of probability theory and complex analysis. The aim of this workshop is to combine both discrete and continuous approaches, as well as the statistical physics/combinatorial and the probabilistic points of view. Topics include quantum gravity, planar maps, discrete conformal analysis, SLE, and other statistical models such as loop gases.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 03:08 PM PDT
  100. Seminar Open Problems Seminar

    Updated on Jan 27, 2012 02:37 AM PST
  101. Seminar Open Problems Seminar

    Updated on Jan 27, 2012 02:36 AM PST
  102. Seminar Open Problems Seminar

    Updated on Jan 27, 2012 02:36 AM PST
  103. Seminar Open Problems Seminar

    Updated on Jan 27, 2012 02:35 AM PST
  104. Seminar Postdoc Seminar

    Updated on Feb 01, 2012 07:40 AM PST
  105. Seminar Postdoc Seminar

    Updated on Feb 01, 2012 07:41 AM PST
  106. Workshop Percolation and Interacting Systems

    Organizers: Geoffrey R. Grimmett (University of Cambridge), Eyal Lubetzky* (Microsoft Research), Jeffrey Steif (Chalmers University of Technology), and Maria E. Vares (Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas)

    Over the last ten years there has been spectacular progress in the understanding of geometrical properties of random processes. Of particular importance in the study of these complex random systems is the aspect of their phase transition (in the wide sense of an abrupt change in macroscopic behavior caused by a small variation in some parameter) and critical phenomena, whose applications range from physics, to the performance of algorithms on networks, to the survival of a biological species.

    Recent advances in the scope of rigorous scaling limits for discrete random systems, most notably for 2D systems such as percolation and the Ising model via SLE, have greatly contributed to the understanding of both the critical geometry of these systems and the behavior of dynamical stochastic processes modeling their evolution. While some of the techniques used in the analysis of these systems are model-specific, there is a remarkable interplay between them. The deep connection between percolation and interacting particle systems such as the Ising and Potts models has allowed one model to successfully draw tools and rigorous theory from the other.

    The aim of this workshop is to share and attempt to push forward the state-of-the-art understanding of the geometry and dynamic evolution of these models, with a main focus on percolation, the random cluster model, Ising and other interacting particle systems on lattices.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 03:08 PM PDT
  107. Seminar Open Problems Seminar

    Updated on Jan 27, 2012 02:35 AM PST
  108. Workshop Hot Topics: Thin Groups and Super-strong Approximation

    Organizers: Emmanuel Breuillard* (Universite Paris-Sud, Orsay), Alexander Gamburd (CUNY Graduate Center), Jordan Ellenberg (University of Wisconsin - Madison), Emmanuel Kowalski (ETH Zurich), Hee Oh (Brown University)

    The workshop will focus on recent developments concerning various quantitative aspects of "thin groups". These are discrete subgroups of semisimple Lie groups which are both « big » (i.e. Zariski dense) and « small » (i.e. of infinite co-volume). This dual nature leads to many intricate questions. Over the past few years, many new ideas and techniques, arising in particular from arithmetic combinatorics, have been involved in the study of such groups, leading for instance to far-reaching generalizations of the strong approximation theorem in which congruence quotients are shown to exhibit a spectral gap (super-strong approximation).

    Simultaneously and sometimes surprisingly, the study of thin groups turns out to be of fundamental importance in a variety of subjects, including equidistribution of homogeneous flows and lattice points counting problems, dynamics on Teichmuller space, the Bourgain-Gamburd-Sarnak sieve in orbit, and arithmetic or geometric properties of certain types of monodromy groups and coverings. The workshop will gather a variety of experts from group theory, number theory, ergodic theory and harmonic analysis to present the accomplishments to date to a broad audience and discuss directions for further study.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 02:00 PM PDT
  109. Workshop Bay Area Differential Geometry Seminar (BADGS) Spring 2012

    Organizers: David Bao (San Francisco State University), Robert Bryant (Mathematical Sciences Research Institute), Joel Hass (University of California, Davis), David Hoffman* (Stanford University), Rafe Mazzeo (Stanford University), Richard Montgomery (University of California, Santa Cruz)

    The Bay Area Differential Geometry Seminar meets 3 times each year and is a 1-day seminar on recent developments in differential geometry and geometric analysis, broadly interpreted. Typically, it runs from mid-morning until late afternoon, with 3-4 speakers. Lunch will be available and the final talk will be followed by dinner.

    Location: Stanford University

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 01:32 PM PDT
  110. Seminar Open Problems Seminar

    Updated on Jan 27, 2012 02:34 AM PST
  111. Seminar Abelian networks

    Updated on Jan 26, 2012 04:20 AM PST
  112. Seminar Open Problems Seminar

    Updated on Jan 17, 2012 02:18 AM PST
  113. Seminar Postdoc 5-Minute Talks

    Updated on Jan 24, 2012 04:13 AM PST
  114. Seminar Postdoc Seminar

    Updated on Jan 19, 2012 01:30 AM PST
  115. Seminar Postdoc Seminar

    Created on Jan 19, 2012 01:28 AM PST
  116. Workshop Introductory Workshop: Lattice Models and Combinatorics

    Organizers: Cédric Boutillier (Université Pierre et Marie Curie), Tony Guttmann* (University of Melbourne), Christian Krattenthaler (University of Vienna), Nicolai Reshetikhin (University of California, Berkeley), and David Wilson (Microsoft Research)

    Research at the interface of lattice statistical mechanics and combinatorial problems of ``large sets" has been and exciting and fruitful field in the last decade or so. In this workshop we plan to develop a broad spectrum of methods and applications, spanning the spectrum from theoretical developments to the numerical end. This will cover the behaviour of lattice models at a macroscopic level (scaling limits at criticality and their connection with SLE) and also at a microscopic level (combinatorial and algebraic structures), as well as efficient enumeration techniques and Monte Carlo algorithms to generate these objects.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 02:00 PM PDT
  117. Workshop Connections for Women: Discrete Lattice Models in Mathematics, Physics, and Computing

    Organizers: Beatrice de Tiliere (University Pierre et Marie Curie), Dana Randall* (Georgia Institute of Technology), and Chris Soteros (University of Saskatchewan)

    This 2-day workshop will bring together researchers from discrete mathematics, probability theory, theoretical computer science and statistical physics to explore topics at their interface. The focus will be on combinatorial structures, probabilistic algorithms and models that arise in the study of physical systems. This will include the study of phase transitions, probabilistic combinatorics, Markov chain Monte Carlo methods, and random structures and randomized algorithms.

    Since discrete lattice models stand at the interface of these fields, the workshop will start with background talks in each of the following three areas: Statistical and mathematical physics; Combinatorics of lattice models; Sampling and computational issues. These talks will describe the general framework and recent developments in the field and will be followed with shorter talks highlighting recent research in the area.

    The workshop will celebrate academic and gender diversity, bringing together women and men at junior and senior levels of their careers from mathematics, physics and computer science.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 02:00 PM PDT
  118. Program Random Spatial Processes

    Organizers: Mireille Bousquet-Mélou (Université de Bordeaux I, France), Richard Kenyon* (Brown University), Greg Lawler (University of Chicago), Andrei Okounkov (Columbia University), and Yuval Peres (Microsoft Research Laboratories)

    In recent years probability theory (and here we mean probability theory in the largest sense, comprising combinatorics, statistical mechanics, algorithms, simulation) has made immense progress in understanding the basic two-dimensional models of statistical mechanics and random surfaces. Prior to the 1990s the major interests and achievements of probability theory were (with some exceptions for dimensions 4 or more) with respect to one-dimensional objects: Brownian motion and stochastic processes, random trees, and the like. Inspired by work of physicists in the ’70s and ’80s on conformal invariance and field theories in two dimensions, a number of leading probabilists and combinatorialists began thinking about spatial process in two dimensions: percolation, polymers, dimer models, Ising models. Major breakthroughs by Kenyon, Schramm, Lawler, Werner, Smirnov, Sheffield, and others led to a rigorous underpinning of conformal invariance in two-dimensional systems and paved the way for a new era of “two-dimensional” probability theory.

    Updated on Mar 18, 2014 05:04 PM PDT
  119. Seminar Postdoc Seminar

    Updated on Aug 31, 2011 10:13 AM PDT
  120. Workshop Quantitative Geometry in Computer Science

    Organizers: Irit Dinur (Weizmann Institute), Subhash Khot (Courant Institute), Manor Mendel* (Open University of Israel and Microsoft Research), Assaf Naor (Courant Institute), and Alistair Sinclair (University of California, Berkeley)

    Geometric problems which are inherently quantitative occur in various aspects of theoretical computer science, including
    a) Algorithmic tasks for geometric questions such as clustering and proximity data structures.
    b) Geometric methods in the design of approximation algorithms for combinatorial optimization problems, including the analysis of semidefinite programs and embedding methods.
    c) Geometric questions arising from computational complexity, particularly in hardness of approximation. These include isoperimetric and Fourier analytic problems. These include isoperimetric and Fourier analytic problems.

    This workshops aims to present recent progress in these directions.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 02:00 PM PDT
  121. Seminar Postdoc Seminar

    Created on Nov 10, 2011 05:13 AM PST
  122. Seminar Mean curvature flow

    Updated on Sep 18, 2013 03:09 PM PDT
  123. Workshop Chern Centennial Conference

    Organizers: Robert Bryant (Co-Chair, Mathematical Science Research Institute - MSRI), Yiming Long (Co-Chair, Chern Institute of Mathematics - CIM), Hélène Barcelo (Mathematical Science Research Institute - MSRI), May Chu (S. S. Chern Foundation for Mathematical Research), and Lei Fu (Chern Institute of Mathematics - CIM).

    The Mathematical Sciences Research Institute (MSRI), in conjunction with the Chern Institute of Mathematics (CIM) in Tianjin, China, celebrates the centennial of the birth of Shiing-Shen Chern, one of the greatest geometers of the 20th century and MSRI's co-founder. In commemoration of Chern's work, MSRI and CIM will hold a two-week international mathematics conference. During the first week, October 24 to 28, 2011, the conference will take place at CIM in Tianjin, China. During the second week, October 30 to November 5, 2011, the conference will be held at MSRI in Berkeley, California.

    The auditorium at MSRI can seat about 140 participants. We advise early registration.

    Updated on Mar 17, 2014 03:01 PM PDT
  124. Workshop Embedding Problems in Banach Spaces and Group Theory

    Organizers: William Johnson* (Texas A&M University), Bruce Kleiner (Yale University and Courant Institute), Gideon Schechtman (Weizmann Institute), Nicole Tomczak-Jaegermann (University of Alberta), and Alain Valette (Université de Neuchâtel)

    This workshop is devoted to various kinds of embeddings of metric spaces into Banach spaces, including biLipschitz embeddings, uniform embeddings, and coarse embeddings, as well as linear embeddings of finite dimensional spaces into low dimensional $\ell_p^n$ spaces. There will be an emphasis on the relevance to geometric group theory, and an exploration into the use of metric differentiation theory to effect embeddings.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 03:06 PM PDT
  125. Seminar RD in higher rank

    Updated on Sep 30, 2011 04:22 AM PDT
  126. Workshop Probabilistic Reasoning in Quantitative Geometry

    Organizers: Anna Erschler* (Université Paris-Sud), Assaf Naor (Courant Institute), and Yuval Peres (Microsoft Research)

    "Probabilistic Reasoning in Quantitative Geometry" refers to the use of probabilistic techniques to prove geometric theorems that do not have any a priori probabilistic content. A classical instance of this approach is the probabilistic method to prove existence of geometric objects (examples include Dvoretzky's theorem, the Johnson-Lindenstrauss lemma, and the use of expanders and random graphs for geometric constructions). Other examples are the use of probabilistic geometric invariants in the local theory of Banach spaces (sums of independent random variables in the context of type and cotype, and martingale-based invariants), the more recent use of such invariants in metric geometry (e.g., Markov type in the context of embedding and extension problems), probabilistic tools in group theory, the use of probabilistic methods to prove geometric inequalities (e.g., maximal inequalities, singular integrals, Grothendieck inequalities), the use of probabilistic reasoning to prove metric embedding results such as Bourgain's embedding theorem (where the embedding is deterministic, but its analysis benefits from a probabilistic interpretation), probabilistic interpretations of curvature and their applications, and the use of probabilistic arguments in the context of isoperimetric problems (e.g., Gaussian, rearrangement, and transportation cost methods).

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 03:06 PM PDT
  127. Seminar Dvoretsky\\'s Theorem

    Updated on Sep 12, 2013 10:45 AM PDT
  128. Seminar Graph Sparsification

    Updated on Sep 02, 2011 02:45 AM PDT
  129. Seminar MSRI Evans Lecture

    Differentiability of Lipschitz functions and tangents of sets

    Updated on Sep 18, 2013 03:19 PM PDT
  130. Workshop Introductory Workshop on Quantitative Geometry

    Organizers: Keith Ball (University College London), Eva Kopecka* (Mathematical Institute, Prague), Assaf Naor (Courant Institute), and Yuval Peres (Microsoft Research)

    Quantitative Geometry deals with geometric questions in which quantitative or asymptotic considerations occur. The workshop will provide a mathematical introduction, a foretaste, of the many themes this exciting topic comprises: geometric group theory, theory of Lipschitz functions, large scale and coarse geometry, embeddings of metric spaces, quantitative aspects of Banach space theory, geometric measure theory and of isoperimetry, and more.

    Updated on Apr 13, 2014 01:03 PM PDT
  131. Workshop Connections for Women in Quantitative Geometry

    Organizers: Keith Ball* (University College London), Eva Kopecka (Mathematical Institute, Prague), Assaf Naor (Courant Institute), and Yuval Peres (Microsoft Research)

    This workshop will provide an introduction to the program on Quantitative Geometry. There will be several short lecture series, given by speakers chosen for the accessibility of their lectures, designed to introduce non-specialists or students to some of the major themes of the program.

    Updated on Dec 11, 2013 11:56 AM PST
  132. Program Quantitative Geometry

    Organizers: Keith Ball (University College London, United Kingdom), Emmanuel Breuillard (Université Paris-Sud 11, France) , Jeff Cheeger (New York University, Courant Institute), Marianna Csornyei (University College London, United Kingdom), Mikhail Gromov (Courant Institute and Institut des Hautes Études Scientifiques, France), Bruce Kleiner (New York University, Courant Institute), Vincent Lafforgue (Université Pierre et Marie Curie, France), Manor Mendel (The Open University of Israel), Assaf Naor* (New York University, Courant Institute), Yuval Peres (Microsoft Research Laboratories), and Terence Tao (University of California, Los Angeles)

    The fall 2011 program "Quantitative Geometry" is devoted to the investigation of geometric questions in which quantitative/asymptotic considerations are inherent and necessary for the formulation of the problems being studied. Such topics arise naturally in a wide range of mathematical disciplines, with significant relevance both to the internal development of the respective fields, as well as to applications in areas such as theoretical computer science. Examples of areas that will be covered by the program are: geometric group theory, the theory of Lipschitz functions (e.g., Lipschitz extension problems and structural aspects such as quantitative differentiation), large scale and coarse geometry, embeddings of metric spaces and their applications to algorithm design, geometric aspects of harmonic analysis and probability, quantitative aspects of linear and non-linear Banach space theory, quantitative aspects of geometric measure theory and isoperimetry, and metric invariants arising from embedding theory and Riemannian geometry. The MSRI program aims to crystallize the interactions between researchers in various relevant fields who might have a lack of common language, even though they are working on related questions.

    Updated on Apr 23, 2014 10:15 AM PDT
  133. Summer Graduate School Cluster Algebras and Cluster Combinatorics

    Organizers: Gregg Musiker (University of Minnesota), Lauren Williams* (University of California, Berkeley)

    Cluster algebras are a class of combinatorially defined rings that provide a unifying structure for phenomena in a variety of algebraic and geometric contexts. A partial list of related areas includes quiver representations, statistical physics, and Teichmuller theory. This summer workshop for graduate students will focus on the combinatorial aspects of cluster algebras, thereby providing a concrete introduction to this rapidly-growing field. Besides providing background on the fundamentals of cluster theory, the summer school will cover complementary topics such as total positivity, the polyhedral geometry of cluster complexes, cluster algebras from surfaces, and connections to statistical physics. No prior knowledge of cluster algebras will be assumed.

    The workshop will consist of four mini-courses with accompanying tutorials. Students will also have opportunities for further exploration using computer packages in Java and Sage.

    Updated on Sep 11, 2013 09:58 AM PDT
  134. Summer Graduate School Toric Varieties in Cortona, Italy

    Organizers: Scientific Committee: David Cox* (Amherst College) and Hal Schenck (University of Illinois)
    Organizing Committee: Giorgio Patrizio (Università di Firenze, Italy) and Sandro Verra (Università di Roma Tre, Italy)

    In cooperation with INdAM (Istituto Nazionale di Alta Matematica) and the SMI (Scuola Matematica Interuniversitaria), MSRI will sponsor a summer graduate workshop (SGW) on toric varieties in Cortona during summer of 2011; the workshop will reprise the very successful SGW on toric varieties held at MSRI in 2009.
    Toric varieties are algebraic varieties defined by combinatorial data, and there is a wonderful interplay between algebra, combinatorics and geometry involved in their study. Many of the key concepts of abstract algebraic geometry (for example, constructing a variety by glueing affine pieces) have very concrete interpretations in the toric case, making toric varieties an ideal tool for introducing students to abstruse concepts.

    Special restrictions apply, please see the workshop homepage.

    Updated on May 07, 2013 11:14 PM PDT
  135. Summer Graduate School Geometric Measure Theory and Applications

    Organizers: Camillo De Lellis (Universität Zürich), Tatiana Toro* (University of Washington)

    Geometric Measure Theory (GMT) is a field of Mathematics that has contributed greatly to the development of the calculus of variations and geometric analysis. In recent years it has experienced a new boom with the development of GMT in the metric space setting which has lead to unexpected applications (for examples to questions arising from theoretical computer sciences). The goal of this summer graduate workshop is to introduce students to different aspects of this field. There will be 5 mini-courses and a couple of research lectures. We expect students to have a solid background in measure theory.

    Updated on Dec 18, 2013 10:16 PM PST
  136. Summer Graduate School IAS-PCMI Summer School on Moduli Spaces of Riemann Surfaces

    Organizers: Benson Farb (University of Chicago), Richard Hain (Duke University), and Eduard Looijenga (University of Utrecht, Netherlands)

    The study of moduli spaces of Riemann surface is a rich mixture of geometric topology, algebraic topology, complex analysis and algebraic geometry. Each community of researchers that studies these moduli spaces generates its own problems and its own techniques for solving them. However, it is not uncommon for researchers in one community to solve problems generated by another once they become aware of them. The goal of this summer school is to give graduate students a broad background in the various approaches to the study of moduli spaces of Riemann surfaces so that they will be aware of the problems and techniques of many of the communities that study these fascinating objects. Graduate student participants from the various communities will be encouraged to interact with their colleagues from the other communities of students in order to maximize cross fertilization.

    Special restrictions apply, please see the workshop homepage.

    Updated on Apr 27, 2011 06:34 AM PDT
  137. Summer Graduate School Seminaire de Mathematiques Superieures 2011. Metric Measure Spaces: Geometric and Analytic Aspects.

    Organizers: Galia Dafni* (Concordia University, Montreal), Robert McCann (University of Toronto), and Alina Stancu (Concordia University, Montreal)

    In cooperation with the CRM (Centre de Recherches Mathematiques), the Fields Institute, and the PIMS (Pacific Insitute for Mathematical Sciences), MSRI will sponsor a summer graduate workshop on Metric measure spaces: geometric and analytic aspects in Montreal, Canada.
    In recent decades, metric-measure spaces have emerged as a fruitful source of mathematical questions in their own right, and as indispensable tools for addressing classical problems in geometry, topology, dynamical systems and partial differential equations. The purpose of the 2011 summer school is to lead young scientists to the research frontier concerning the analysis and geometry of metric-measure spaces, by exposing them to a series of mini-courses featuring leading researchers who will present both the state-of-the-art and the exciting challenges which remain.

    Special restrictions apply, please see the workshop homepage.

    Updated on May 07, 2013 11:14 PM PDT
  138. MSRI-UP MSRI-UP 2011: Mathematical Finance

    Organizers: Dr. Duane Cooper (Morehouse College), Dr. Ricardo Cortez (Tulane University), Dr. Herbert Medina (Loyola Marymount University), Dr. Ivelisse Rubio (University of Puerto Rico), and Dr. Suzanne Weekes*(Worcester Polytechnic Institute)

    The MSRI-UP summer program is designed for undergraduate students who have completed two years of university-level mathematics courses and would like to conduct research in the mathematical sciences. Due to funding restrictions, only U.S. citizens and permanent residents are eligible to apply and the program cannot accept foreign students regardless of funding.

    Updated on Mar 07, 2012 08:55 AM PST
  139. Summer Graduate School The Dirichlet Space: Connections between Operator Theory, Function Theory, and Complex Analysis

    Organizers: Nicola Arcozzi (Universita' di Bologna), Richard Rochberg (Washington University), Eric T Sawyer (McMaster University), Brett D Wick* (Georgia Institute of Technology)

    This workshop will focus on the classical Dirichlet space of holomorphic functions on the unit disk. This space is at the center of several active, interrelated areas of research that, viewed more broadly, focus on the interaction between function theoretic operator theory and potential theory. There are several goals of this Summer Graduate Workshop. First, mathematically, the workshop will demonstrate the basic properties of the Dirichlet space, then introduce the technique of Trees in Function Spaces. The workshop will show the interconnections between the areas of Complex Analysis, Function Theory, and Operator Theory and will also illustrate the real-variable analogues of the analytic result discussed.

    Updated on Sep 12, 2013 10:19 AM PDT
  140. MSRI-UP MSRI-UP 2011

    Organizers: Duane Cooper (Morehouse College), Ricardo Cortez (Tulane University), Herbert Medina (Loyola Marymount University), Ivelisse Rubio (University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus), Suzanne Weekes* (Worcester Polytechnic Institute)

    SELECTION OF PARTICIPANTS IS NOW CLOSED.

    The MSRI-UP summer program is designed for undergraduate students who have completed two years of university-level mathematics courses and would like to conduct research in the mathematical sciences. MSRI-UP includes summer research opportunities, mentoring, workshops on the graduate school application process, and follow-up support.

    Updated on May 01, 2013 11:54 PM PDT
  141. Summer Graduate School Commutative Algebra

    Organizers: Daniel Erman (Stanford University), Irena Swanson* (Reed College), and Amelia Taylor (Colorado College)

    This workshop will involve a combination of theory and symbolic computation in commutative algebra. The lectures are intended to introduce three active areas of research: Boij-Söderberg theory, algebraic statistics, and integral closure. The lectures will be accompanied with tutorials on the computer algebra system Macaulay 2.

    Updated on Apr 22, 2014 12:18 PM PDT
  142. Seminar AS Informal Seminar

    Updated on Sep 12, 2013 08:53 AM PDT
  143. Seminar AS Informal Seminar

    Updated on May 18, 2011 02:02 AM PDT
  144. Seminar AS PD seminar

    Created on Apr 29, 2011 07:52 AM PDT
  145. Seminar 2011 Chern Lectures

    Updated on Apr 05, 2011 05:14 AM PDT
  146. Seminar 2011 Chern Lectures

    Updated on Apr 05, 2011 05:13 AM PDT
  147. Workshop Arithmetic Statistics

    Organizers: Brian Conrey (American Institute of Mathematics), Barry Mazur (Harvard University), and Michael Rubinstein* (University of Waterloo)

    Our workshop will highlight some work relevant to or carried out during our program at the MSRI, including statistical results about ranks for elliptic curves, zeros of L-functions, curves over finite fields, as well as algorithms for L-functions, point counting, and automorphic forms.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 03:06 PM PDT
  148. Seminar 2011 Chern Lectures

    Updated on Apr 05, 2011 05:12 AM PDT
  149. Seminar 2011 Chern Lectures

    Updated on Apr 04, 2011 03:13 AM PDT
  150. Seminar FBP-Informal Seminar

    Updated on Apr 01, 2011 03:03 AM PDT
  151. Seminar SSL group, course "Space Weather"

    Group will visit the first floor terrace to catch a view of the satellite dish.

    Created on Mar 10, 2011 01:27 AM PST
  152. Workshop Free Boundary Problems, Theory and Applications

    Organizers: John King (University of Nottingham), Arshak Petrosyan* (Purdue University), Henrik Shahgholian (Royal Institute of Technology), and Georg Weiss (University of Dusseldorf)

    Many problems in physics, industry, finance, biology, and other areas can be described by partial differential equations that exhibit apriori unknown sets, such as interfaces, moving boundaries, shocks, etc. The study of such sets, also known as free boundaries, often occupies a central position in such problems. The main objective of the workshop is to bring together experts in various theoretical an applied aspects of free boundary problems.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 03:05 PM PDT
  153. Seminar AS-FRG Project


    Updated on Sep 12, 2013 08:53 AM PDT
  154. Workshop Workshop on Mathematics Journals

    Organizers: James M Crowley (Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics), Susan Hezlet* (London Mathematical Society), Robion C Kirby (University of California, Berkeley), and Donald E McClure (American Mathematical Society)

    Mathematics relies on its journal literature as the main conduit for peer review and dissemination of research, and it does so more heavily and differently to other scientific fields. The conflict between universal access and the traditional subscription model that funds the journals has been debated for the past decade, while hard data on financial sustainability and usage under the different models has been slow to appear. However the last ten years have seen the move from print to the electronic version of journals becoming the version of record and the workshop plans to take an evidence-based approach to discussing dissemination, access and usage of mathematics journals.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 03:00 PM PDT
  155. Seminar The Arithmetic of Quadratic Forms

    Refreshments after lecture at La Val\\\\\\'s Pizza.




    Updated on Feb 13, 2011 02:31 AM PST
  156. Seminar AS-FRG Project




    Updated on Jan 28, 2011 05:27 AM PST
  157. Seminar Order and Chaos





    Updated on Sep 11, 2013 12:54 PM PDT
  158. Seminar Low-Lying Zeros"

    Created on Feb 07, 2011 04:39 AM PST
  159. Seminar AS-Informal Study Group


    Updated on Jan 24, 2011 08:36 AM PST
  160. Seminar MSRI-Evans Lecture- Henryk Iwaniec

    Refreshments after lecture at La Val's Pizza.

    Updated on Jan 15, 2011 08:15 AM PST
  161. Seminar FBP-Working Seminar-TBA


    Updated on Jan 24, 2011 08:27 AM PST
  162. Workshop Introductory Workshop: Arithmetic Statistics

    Organizers: Barry Mazur (Harvard University), Carl Pomerance (Dartmouth College), and Michael Rubinstein* (University of Waterloo)

    Our Introductory Workshop will focus largely on the background, recent work, and current problems regarding: Selmer groups and Mordell-Weil groups, and the distribution of their ranks (and "sizes") over families of elliptic curves, including recent work of Manjul Bhargava and Arul Shankar where they have shown that the average size of the 2-Selmer group of an elliptic curve over Q is 3, and thereby obtains information about the average rank of Mordell-Weil groups; related work on the asymptotics of number fields; certain natural families of L-functions, and the statistical distribution of their zeros and values; complementary algorithmic methods and experimental results regarding L-functions, automorphic forms, elliptic curves and number fields; the statistical behavior of eigenvalues of Frobenius elements in Galois representations.


     

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 03:00 PM PDT
  163. Seminar Postdoctoral Seminars FBP

    Pizza Lunch

    Updated on Jan 24, 2011 08:17 AM PST
  164. Workshop Connections for Women: Arithmetic Statistics

    Organizers: Chantal David (Concordia University) and Nina Snaith* (University of Bristol)

    The format of this 2-day workshop will be colloquium-style presentations that will introduce some of the major topics touched on by the "Arithmetic Statistics" program. They will be pitched so as to be understandable to researchers with a variety of mathematical backgrounds. The talks are designed broadly as a lead-in to the program's initial workshop (taking place the following week) and will include topics such as the Sato-Tate conjecture, random matrix theory, and enumeration of number fields. The purpose will be to provide background but also to present the exciting areas where progress is happening fast, where major problems have been solved, or where there are significant open questions that need to be tackled. With this we aim to provide motivation for the Connections participants to involve themselves with the remainder of the program.

     

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 01:27 PM PDT
  165. Seminar "5-Minute Presentations"

    Pizza Lunch 12pm-1:30pm

    Created on Jan 24, 2011 01:22 AM PST
  166. Seminar Free Boundary Problems

    Refreshments after lecture at La Val\\'s Pizza.



    Updated on May 15, 2013 04:46 PM PDT
  167. Workshop Introductory Workshop: Free Boundary Problems, Theory and Applications

    Organizers: Tatiana Toro* (University of Washington)

    Many problems in physics, industry, finance, biology, and other areas can be described by partial differential equations that exhibit a priori unknown sets, such as interfaces, moving boundaries or shocks for example. The study of such sets, also known as free boundaries, often plays a central role in the understanding of such problems. The aim of this workshop is to introduce several free boundary problems arising in completely different areas.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 03:00 PM PDT
  168. Workshop Connections for Women: Free Boundary Problems, Theory and Applications

    Organizers: Catherine Bandle (University of Basel), Claudia Lederman (University of Buenos Aires), Noemi Wolanski (University of Buenos Aires)

    Contributions of women working in areas related to free boundary problems will be presented. It will include survey lectures on current problems and on standard techniques used in this field, as well as more specific new results of individual researchers. One of the major goals besides the scientific aspect, is to encourage women mathematicians to interact and to build networks. It addresses also to graduate students who are very welcome. A discussion on women’s experiences in the mathematical community should help them to find their way in their mathematical career.

     

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 01:59 PM PDT
  169. Program Free Boundary Problems, Theory and Applications

    Organizers: Luis Caffarelli (University of Texas, Austin), Henri Berestycki (Centre d'Analyse et de Mathématique Sociales, France), Laurence C. Evans (University of California, Berkeley), Mikhail Feldman (University of Wisconsin, Madison), John Ockendon (University of Oxford, United Kingdom), Arshak Petrosyan (Purdue University), Henrik Shahgholian* (The Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden), Tatiana Toro (University of Washington), and Nina Uraltseva (Steklov Mathematical Institute, Russia)

    This program aims at the study of various topics within the area of Free Boundaries Problems, from the viewpoints of theory and applications. Many problems in physics, industry, finance, biology, and other areas can be described by partial differential equations that exhibit apriori unknown sets, such as interfaces, moving boundaries, shocks, etc. The study of such sets, also known as free boundaries, often occupies a central position in such problems. The aim of this program is to gather experts in the field with knowledge of various applied and theoretical aspects of free boundary problems.

    Updated on Dec 20, 2013 02:53 PM PST
  170. Program Arithmetic Statistics

    Organizers: Brian Conrey (American Institute of Mathematics), John Cremona (University of Warwick, United Kingdom), Barry Mazur (Harvard University), Michael Rubinstein* (University of Waterloo, Canada ), Peter Sarnak (Princeton University), Nina Snaith (University of Bristol, United Kingdom), and William Stein (University of Washington)

    L -functions attached to modular forms and/or to algebraic varieties and algebraic number fields are prominent in quite a wide range of number theoretic issues, and our recent growth of understanding of the analytic properties of L-functions has already lead to profound applications regarding among other things the statistics related to arithmetic problems. This program will emphasize statistical aspects of L-functions, modular forms, and associated arithmetic and algebraic objects from several different perspectives — theoretical, algorithmic, and experimental.

    Updated on Apr 11, 2014 02:24 PM PDT
  171. Workshop Random Matrix Theory and its Applications II

    Organizers: Alexei Borodin* (California Institute of Technology), Percy Deift (Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences), Alice Guionnet (Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon), Pierre van Moerbeke (Universite Catholique de Louvain and Brandeis University), and Craig A.Tracy (University of California, Davis)

    Random matrix theory (RMT) was introduced into the theoretical physics community by Eugene Wignerinthe 1950s as a model for the scattering resonances of neutrons off large nuclei. In multivariate statistics, random matrix models were introduced in the late 1920s by John Wishart and subsequently developed by Anderson, James and others. Since these early beginnings RMT has found an extraordinary variety of mathematical, physical and engineering applications that, to name some, include number theory, stochastic growth models, tiling problems and wireless communications.

     

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 03:00 PM PDT
  172. Seminar Random sorting networks


    Updated on Nov 29, 2010 03:33 AM PST
  173. Workshop SIAM/MSRI workshop on Hybrid Methodologies for Symbolic-Numeric Computation

    Organizers: Mark Giesbrecht (University of Waterloo), Erich Kaltofen* (North Carolina State University), Daniel Lichtblau (Wolfram Research), Seth Sullivant (North Carolina State University), and Lihong Zhi (Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing)

    This workshop will provide a forum for researchers on both sides (and the middle!) of hybrid symbolic-numeric computation. We anticipate inviting as primary speakers some of the original contributors in the field, as well as younger researchers making strong contributions on different aspects of the field.


     

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 01:57 PM PDT
  174. Workshop Inverse Problems: Theory and Applications

    Organizers: Liliana Borcea (Rice University), Carlos Kenig (University of Chicago), Maarten de Hoop (Purdue University), Peter Kuchment (Texas A&M University), Lassi Paivarinta (University of Helsinki), and Gunther Uhlmann* (University of Washington)

    Inverse Problems are problems where causes for a desired or an observed effect are to be determined. They lie at the heart of scientific inquiry and technological development. Applications include a number of medical as well as other imaging techniques, location of oil and mineral deposits in the earth's substructure, creation of astrophysical images from telescope data, finding cracks and interfaces within materials, shape optimization, model identification in growth processes, and modelling in the life sciences.
    The speakers in the workshop will cover a broad range of the most recent developments in the theory and applications of inverse problems.





     

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 02:59 PM PDT
  175. Workshop Hot Topics: Kervaire invariant

    Organizers: Mike Hill (University of Virginia), Michael Hopkins (Harvard University), and Douglas C. Ravanel* (University of Rochester)

    This workshop will focus on the ideas surrounding the recent solution to the Arf-Kervaire invariant problem in stable homotopy theory by Mike Hill, Mike Hopkins and Doug Ravenel. There will be talks on relevant aspects of equivariant stable homotopy theory, including the norm functor and the slice tower. The pertinent parts of chromatic homotopy theory will be covered including formal groups and formal $A$-modules, the Hopkins-Miller theorem, finite subgroups of Morava stabilizer groups and Ravenel's 1978 solution to the analogous problem at primes bigger than 3. There will also be several talks by the organizers giving a detailed account of the proof of the main theorem. Finally there will be a discussion of the questions raised by the unexpected statement of the theorem.




     

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 02:59 PM PDT
  176. Workshop Bay Area Differential Geometry (BADG) Seminar Fall 2010

    Organizers: David Bao (San Francisco State University), Robert Bryant (Mathematical Sciences Research Institute), Joel Hass (University of California, Davis), David Hoffman* (Stanford University), Rafe Mazzeo (Stanford University), Richard Montgomery (University of California, Santa Cruz)

    The Bay Area Differential Geometry Seminar meets 3 times each year and is a 1-day seminar on recent developments in differential geometry and geometric analysis, broadly interpreted. Typically, it runs from mid-morning until late afternoon, with 3-4 speakers. Lunch will be available at MSRI (participants will be asked to make a donation to help defray their lunch expenses) and the final talk will be followed by dinner. The schedule (with speakers) will be posted as soon as it becomes available.The October 23rd meeting takes place on the 60th birthday of Rick Schoen, and the dinner will recognize this happy coincidence.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 02:59 PM PDT
  177. Workshop 21st Bay Area Discrete Math Day (BADMath Day)

    Organizers: Federico Ardila (San Francisco State University), Ruchira Datta (University of California, Berkeley), Tim Hsu (San Jose State University), Fu Liu (University of California, Davis), Carol Meyers (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory), Raman Sanyal* (University of California, Berkeley), Rick Scott (Santa Clara University), and Ellen Veomett (California State University, East Bay)

    BADMath Days are one-day meetings aimed at facilitating communication between researchers and graduate students of discrete mathematics around the San Francisco Bay Area. These days happen twice a year and strive to create an informal atmosphere to talk about discrete mathematics. The term "discrete mathematics" is chosen to include at least the following topics: Algebraic and Enumerative Combinatorics, Discrete Geometry, Graph Theory, Coding and Design Theory, Combinatorial Aspects of Computational Algebra and Geometry, Combinatorial Optimization, Probabilistic Combinatorics, Combinatorial Aspects of Statistics, and Combinatorics in Mathematical Physics.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 01:26 PM PDT
  178. Workshop Connections for Women: An Introduction to Random Matrices

    Organizers: Estelle Basor (American Institute of Mathematics, Palo Alto), Alice Guionnet* (Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon), and Irina Nenciu (University of Illinois at Chicago)

    Topics covered in this workshop will include fundamental problems in random matrices, including universality questions and connections to physics, free probability, Riemann Hilbert problems and applications to other areas of mathematics such as number theory and numerical analysis.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 01:39 PM PDT
  179. Seminar Beyond the Gaussian Universality Class

    Refreshments following the lecture at La Val's Pizza, 1834 Euclid Ave. sponsored by MSRI

    Updated on May 13, 2013 11:01 PM PDT
  180. Workshop Random Matrix Theory and Its Applications I

    Organizers: Jinho Baik (University of Michigan), Percy Deift (Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences), Alexander Its* (Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis), Kenneth McLaughlin (University of Arizona), and Craig A. Tracy (University of California, Davis)

    In the spring of 1999, MSRI hosted a very successful and influential one-semester program on RMT and its applications. At the workshops during the semester, there was a sense of excitement as brand new and very recent results were reported. The goal of the 2010 Program is to showcase the many remarkable developments that have taken place since 1999 and to spur further developments in RMT and Related areas of interacting particle systems (IPS) and integrable systems (IS) as well as to highlight various applications of RMT.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 02:58 PM PDT
  181. Workshop Introductory Workshop on Inverse Problems and Applications

    Organizers: Margaret Cheney (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute), Gunther Uhlmann* (University of Washington), Michael Vogelius( Rutgers), and Maciej Zworski (University of California, Berkeley)

    Inverse Problems are problems where causes for a desired or an observed effect are to be determined. They lie at the heart of scientific inquiry and technological development. Applications include a number of medical as well as other imaging techniques, location of oil and mineral deposits in the earth’s substructure, creation of astrophysical images from telescope data, finding cracks and interfaces within materials, shape optimization, model identification in growth processes and, more recently, modelling in the life sciences.
     

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 02:58 PM PDT
  182. Workshop Connections for Women: Inverse Problems and Applications

    Organizers: Tanya Christiansen (University of Missouri, Columbia), Alison Malcolm (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Shari Moskow (Drexel University), Chrysoula Tsogka (University of Crete), and Gunther Uhlmann* (University of Washington)

    Inverse Problems are problems where causes for a desired or an observed effect are to be determined. They lie at the heart of scientific inquiry and technological development. Applications include a number of medical as well as other imaging techniques, location of oil and mineral deposits in the earth’s substructure, creation of astrophysical images from telescope data, finding cracks and interfaces within materials, shape optimization, model identification in growth processes and, more recently, modelling in the life sciences.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 03:05 PM PDT
  183. Program Inverse Problems and Applications

    Organizers: Liliana Borcea (Rice University), Maarten V. de Hoop (Purdue University), Carlos E. Kenig (University of Chicago), Peter Kuchment (Texas A&M University), Lassi Päivärinta (University of Helsinki, Finland), Gunther Uhlmann* (University of Washington), and Maciej Zworski (University of California, Berkeley)

    Inverse Problems are problems where causes for a desired or an observed effect are to be determined. They lie at the heart of scientific inquiry and technological development. Applications include a number of medical as
    well as other imaging techniques, location of oil and mineral deposits in the earth's substructure, creation of astrophysical images from telescope data, finding cracks and interfaces within materials, shape optimization,
    model identification in growth processes and, more recently, modelling in the life sciences. During the last 10 years or so there has been significant developments both in the mathematical theory and applications of inverse problems. The purpose of the program would be to bring together people working on different aspects of the field, to appraise the current status of development and to encourage interaction between mathematicians and scientists and engineers working directly with the applications.

    Updated on Jan 30, 2014 12:50 PM PST
  184. Program Random Matrix Theory, Interacting Particle Systems and Integrable Systems

    Organizers: Jinho Baik (University of Michigan), Alexei Borodin (California Institute of Technology), Percy A. Deift* (New York University, Courant Institute), Alice Guionnet (École Normale Supérieure de Lyon, France), Craig A. Tracy (University of California, Davis), and Pierre van Moerbeke, (Université Catholique de Louvain, Belgium)

    The goal of this program is to showcase the many remarkable developments that have taken place in the past decade in Random Matrix Theory (RMT) and to spur on further developments on RMT and the related areas Interacting Particle Systems (IPS) and Integrable Systems (IS): IPS provides an arena in which RMT behavior is frequently observed, and IS provides tools which are often useful in analyzing RMT and IPS/RMT behavior.

    Updated on Dec 13, 2013 03:34 PM PST
  185. Summer Graduate School Algebraic, Geometric, and Combinatorial Methods for Optimization

    Organizers: Matthias Köppe (University of California, Davis) and Jiawang Nie (University of California, San Diego)

    This workshop is intended to introduce to graduate students the main ideas of algebraic, geometric and combinatorial methods in global optimization. We emphasize the major developments in the past few years from two viewpoints. The first one is that of the interaction of semidefinite programming and real algebraic geometry and includes topics such as linear matrix inequalities, positive polynomials, and sums of squares. The second viewpoint is that of primal methods and generating function methods in integer linear and nonlinear optimization.

    Updated on Feb 25, 2014 01:47 AM PST
  186. Summer Graduate School Mathematics of Climate Change

    Organizers: Chris Jones (University of North Carolina and University of Warwick), Doug Nychka (National Center for Atmospheric Research), and Mary Lou Zeeman (Bowdoin College)

    NCAR supports scientific research on nearly every aspect of the atmosphere and related components of the Earth’s physical and biological systems. This includes developing state-of-the- art climate models, high performance computing and also innovative ways of observing the atmosphere and oceans. The Center has approximately 1000 staff and is supported primarily by the National Science Foundation. Part of the NCAR mission is to engage students in the problems of understanding climate and weather and so provides an ideal context for this summer graduate workshop. The workshop is also part a larger program at NCAR through the Institute for Mathematics Applied to Geosciences: Mathematicians and Climate.
    For more information, please see NCAR summer school page

    Updated on Mar 31, 2014 12:49 PM PDT
  187. Summer Graduate School IAS/PCMI Research Summer School 2010: Image Processing

    Organizers: Tony Chan (University of California, Los Angeles), Ron Devore (Unversity of South Carolina, Columbia), Stanley Osher (University of California, Los Angeles), and Hongkai Zhao (University of California, Irvine)

    Both an MSRI nomination and PCMI application are required to attend the Image Processing summer school. The application form can be found by going to the PCMI page IAS/PCMI application homepage and clicking on the sentence "You're ready to apply."




    Once the PCMI application is complete IAS/PCMI application homepage please return a letter of nomination from the Director of Graduate Studies to MSRI.

    Updated on Dec 04, 2013 01:28 PM PST
  188. Summer Graduate School Probability workshop: 2010 PIMS Summer School in Probability.

    Organizers: Krzysztof Burdzy (University of Washington), Zhenqing Chen (University of Washington), Christopher Hoffman (University of Washington), Soumik Pal (University of Washington), Yuval Peres ( University of California, Berkeley)

    The 2010 Pacific Institute for the Mathematical Sciences (PIMS) Summer
    School in Probability will be held at the University of Washington and
    Microsoft Research. The workshop will have two main courses, and three short ones.

    For further information please visit the following link pims homepage

    Updated on Dec 13, 2013 03:38 PM PST
  189. Summer Graduate School Sage Days 22: Computing with Elliptic Curves

    Organizers: William Stein (University of Washington)

    This workshop will introduce graduate students to several central ideas in the arithmetic of elliptic curves. Participants will join a project group that will focus mainly on one topic, possibly involving elliptic curves over number fields, complex or p-adic L-functions, Heegner points and Kolyvagin classes, Iwasawa theory, and the Birch and Swinnerton-Dyer conjecture. The workshop will emphasize the essential interplay of abstract mathematics with explicit computation, which has played a central role in number theory ever since Birch and Swinnerton-Dyer made their famous conjecture in the 1960s. Participants will use, and improve, the free open-source Python-based mathematical software system Sage (http://www.sagemath.org) for computational projects.

    Updated on Apr 19, 2014 09:34 AM PDT
  190. Summer Graduate School Summer School on Operator Algebras and Noncommutative Geometry

    Organizers: Heath Emerson, (University of Victoria) Thierry Giordano, (University of Ottawa) Marcelo Laca*, (University of Victoria) Ian Putnam, (University of Victoria)

    The summer school aims to expose participants to the classi cation of noncommutative
    spaces, to the study of their homological and cohomological invariants, and to explore fascinating
    new connections between their symmetries and long standing problems in number
    theory. Additional information can be found on the PIMS page

    Updated on Sep 09, 2013 04:18 PM PDT
  191. MSRI-UP MSRI-UP 2010: Elliptic Curves and Applications

    Organizers: Duane Cooper (Morehouse College), Suzanne Weekes (Worcester Polytechnic Insitute), Ricardo Cortez (Tulane University), Ivelisse Rubio (University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras), and Herbert Medina (Loyola Marymount University)

    The MSRI-UP summer program is designed for undergraduate students who have completed two years of university-level mathematics courses and would like to conduct research in the mathematical sciences. The academic portion of the program will be led by Dr. Edray Goins.

    Updated on May 02, 2013 06:33 PM PDT
  192. Workshop Symplectic Geometry, Noncommutative Geometry and Physics

    Organizers: Robbert Dijkgraaf (Amsterdam), Tohru Eguchi (Kyoto), Yakov Eliashberg* (Stanford), Kenji Fukaya (Kyoto), Yoshiaki Maeda* (Yokohama), Dusa McDuff (Stony Brook), Paul Seidel (Cambridge, MA), Alan Weinstein* (Berkeley).



    Sponsor: Hayashibara Foundation




    Symplectic geometry originated as a mathematical language for Hamiltonian mechanics, but during the last 3 decades it witnessed both, spectacuar development of the mathematical theory and discovery of new connections and applications to physics. Meanwhile, non-commutative geometry naturally entered into this picture.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 02:53 PM PDT
  193. Workshop Symplectic and Poisson Geometry in interaction with Algebra, Analysis and Topology

    Organizers: Yakov Eliashberg (Stanford University), Alvaro Pelayo* (University of California, Berkeley), Steve Zelditch (Northwestern University), Maciej Zworski (University of California, Berkeley)

    The first week of May 2010 coincides with the first year anniversary of Alan Weinstein's retirement from UC Berkeley; Weinstein has been one of the most influential figures in symplectic geometry, Poisson geometry and analysis in the past forty years. Weinstein's fundamental work inspired many others and led to the development of central concepts in symplectic and Poisson geometry, as well as to the establishment of symplectic geometry as an independent discipline within mathematics. This conference will be a forum to celebrate Weinstein's fundamental contributions to geometry and mathematics at large.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 02:53 PM PDT
  194. Workshop Symplectic and Contact Topology and Dynamics: Puzzles and Horizons

    Organizers: Paul Biran (Tel Aviv University), John Etnyre (Georgia Institute of Technology), Helmut Hofer (Courant Institute), Dusa McDuff *(Barnard College), Leonid Polterovich (Tel Aviv University),

    This workshop will focus on recent progress in central problems in
    symplectic and contact topology and Hamiltonian dynamics such as
    rigidity of Lagrangian submanifolds, algebra/topology/geometry of
    symplectomorphism and contactomorphism groups, exotic symplectic and
    contact structures, and existence of
    periodic orbits of Hamiltonian systems and Reeb flows.
    It will explain applications of the "large machines"
    such as Floer Theory, Symplectic Field Theory and Fukaya categories,
    showing where these machines do not yet provide satisfactory
    answers. Special attention will also be paid to articulating
    new problems and
    directions, as well as to explaining
    interactions between symplectic and contact
    topology and other fields.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 11:13 AM PDT
  195. Workshop Research Workshop: Homology Theories of Knots and Links

    Organizers: Peter S. Ozsváth* (Columbia University), Mikhail Khovanov (Columbia University), Peter Teichner (UC Berkeley).

    Link homology is a young and rapidly-developing area drawing on many branches of mathematics. The subject has its roots in representation theory, and it has benefitted from its interactions with low-dimensional, classical, and quantum topology and symplectic geometry. Indeed, several recent developments have underscored the close parallels between link homology and Floer homological invariants for low-dimensional manifolds.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 02:53 PM PDT
  196. Workshop Introductory Workshop: Homology Theories of Knots and Links

    Organizers: Aaron Lauda (Columbia University), Robert Lipshitz (Columbia University), Dylan Thurston* (Columbia University).

    This workshop will introduce the main branches in the study of knot homology theories. It will consist of three mini-courses, one on knot Floer homology and related topics; one on the various approaches to
    Khovanov and Khovanov-Rozansky homology; and one on categorification on quantum groups. (There will also be several stand-alone lectures.) The techniques involved in the three branches are quite different; in
    particular, Heegaard Floer theory is analytic in nature, with its origin in gauge theory and symplectic geometry, while both Khovanov homology and categorification are more algebraic in nature, with origins in representation theory and algebraic geometry. The workshop will provide an opportunity for graduate students and researchers
    outside the field to gain entry, as well as for researchers working in one part of the field to learn about techniques and developments in other parts.

    Updated on Apr 21, 2014 10:09 AM PDT
  197. Workshop Connections for Women: Homology Theories of Knots and Links

    Organizers: Elisenda Grigsby* (Columbia), Olga Plamenevskaya (SUNY/Stonybrook), and Katrin Wehrheim (MIT)

    This 2-day workshop will serve as a prelude to the introductory workshop for the semester-long program on homology theories of knots and links. Survey talks in the mornings will position the work in Khovanov and Heegaard Floer homology in a broader context, focusing on:

    1) applications to classical questions in low-dimensional topology, and
    2) connections to contact and symplectic topology.

    Research talks in the afternoons will highlight the range of current activity in the field. We plan a format of no more than four talks each day to allow ample time for presentation opportunities for younger researchers and formal and informal discussions.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 11:05 AM PDT
  198. Program Homology Theories of Knots and Links

    Organizers: Mikhail Khovanov (Columbia University), Dusa McDuff (Barnard College), Peter Ozsváth* (Columbia University), Lev Rozansky (University of North Carolina), Peter Teichner (University of California, Berkeley), Dylan Thurston (Barnard College), and Zoltan Szabó (Princeton University)

    The aims of this program will be to achieve the following goals:

    1. Promote communication with related disciplines, including the symplectic geometry program in 2009-2010.
    2. Lead to new breakthroughs in the subject and find new applications to low dimensional topology (knot theory, three-manifold topology, and smooth four manifold topology).
    3. Educate a new generation of graduate students and PhD students in this exciting and rapidly-changing subject.

    The program will focus on algebraic link homology and Heegaard Floer homology.

    Updated on Apr 14, 2014 09:11 AM PDT
  199. Workshop Macaulay2 Workgroup

    Organizers: David Eisenbud* (University of California, Berkeley), Amelia Taylor (Colorado College), Hirotachi Abo (University of Idaho), Mike Stillman (Cornell University) and Dan Grayson (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign)

    /Macaulay2/ is a software system devoted to supporting research in algebraic geometry and commutative algebra. Its creation and development have been funded by the National Science Foundation since 1992.

    /Macaulay2/ includes core algorithms for computing Gröbner bases and graded or multi-graded free resolutions of modules over quotient rings of graded or multi-graded polynomial rings with a monomial ordering. The core algorithms are accessible through a versatile high level interpreted user language with a powerful debugger supporting the creation of new classes of mathematical objects and the installation of methods for computing specifically with them. /Macaulay2/ can compute Betti numbers, Ext, cohomology of coherent sheaves on projective varieties, primary decomposition of ideals, integral closure of rings, and more.

    The goal of the workshop was to work at improving and augmenting the functionality of some of the existing packages. Likely projects included computing sheaf cohomology, intersection theory, and enumerative geometry.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 11:52 AM PDT
  200. Workshop Tropical Structures in Geometry and Physics

    Organizers: Mark Gross ( University of California San Diego), Kentaro Hori (University of Toronto), Viatcheslav Kharlamov (Université de Strasbourg (Louis Pasteur), Richard Kenyon* (Brown University)

    One of the successes of tropical geometry is its applications to a number of different areas of recently developing mathematics. Among these are enumerative geometry, symplectic field theory, mirror symmetry, dimer models/random surfaces, amoebas and algas, instantons, cluster varieties, and tropical compactifications. While these fields appear quite diverse, we believe the common meeting ground of tropical geometry will provide a basis for fruitful interactions between participants.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 01:26 PM PDT
  201. Workshop Bay Area Differential Geometry Seminar

    Organizers: Robert Bryant (MSRI), Joel Hass (UC Davis), David Hoffman* (Stanford University), Rafe Mazzeo (Stanford University), Richard Montgomery (UC Santa Cruz).

    The Bay Area Differential Geometry Seminar meets around 3 times each year and is a 1-day seminar on recent developments in differential geometry and global analysis, broadly interpreted. Typically, it runs from mid-morning until late afternoon, with 3-4 speakers. Box lunches will be available for purchase and the final talk will be followed by dinner. The schedule (with speakers) will be posted as soon as it becomes available. Please register and also indicate whether you will be attending the dinner afterwards. If you have questions, please feel free to contact the organizers.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 11:05 AM PDT
  202. Workshop Algebraic Structures in the Theory of Holomorphic Curves

    Organizers: Mohammed Abouzaid* ( Clay Mathematics Institute), Yakov Eliashberg (Stanford University), Kenji Fukaya (Kyoto University), Eleny Ionel (Stanford University), Lenny Ng (Duke University), Paul Seidel (MIT).

    The theory of holomorphic curves in symplectic manifolds leads
    to rich algebraic structures. The study of these structures is
    increasingly important both for understanding the theory itself, and
    for actual computations and applications. The aim of the workshop
    is to survey ongoing developments in the area. Some of the topics
    of interest are: cohomological field theories; relative and tropical
    Gromov-Witten invariants; Symplectic Field Theory (SFT) and connections
    with string topology; theories of holomorphic curves with Lagrangian
    boundary conditions, such as relative SFT, open Gromov-Witten theory,
    and Fukaya categories.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 02:53 PM PDT
  203. Workshop Tropical Geometry in Combinatorics and Algebra

    Organizers: Federico Ardila* (San Francisco State University), David Speyer (MIT), Jenia Tevelev (U Mass Amherst), Lauren Williams (Harvard)

    This workshop will concentrate on tropical methods in Combinatorics
    and Algebra. Some of the topics we expect to explore are
    tropical ideas and methods in combinatorial linear algebra and in
    combinatorial representation theory, as well as computational issues and applications of tropical methods in algebraic statistics.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 02:52 PM PDT
  204. Workshop Hot Topics: Black Holes in Relativity

    Organizers: Mihalis Dafermos (University of Cambridge) and Igor Rodnianski* (Princeton)

    The mathematical study of the dynamics of the Einstein equations forms a central part of both partial differential equations and geometry, and is intimately related to our current physical understanding of gravitational collapse.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 02:51 PM PDT
  205. Workshop Introductory Workshop: Tropical Geometry

    Organizers: Eva Maria Feichtner (U Bremen), Ilia Itenberg* (U Strasbourg), Grigory Mikhalkin (U Genève), Bernd Sturmfels (UC Berkeley)

    This workshop is to lay the foundations for the upcoming program. Mini-courses comprising lectures and exercise/discussion sessions will cover the foundational aspects of tropical geometry as well as its connections with adjacent areas: symplectic geometry, several complex variables, algebraic geometry (in particular enumerative and computational aspects) and geometric combinatorics. The mini-courses will be augmented by research talks on current tropical develpoments to open the scene and set up new goals in the beginning semester.

     

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 01:56 PM PDT
  206. Workshop Connections for Women: Tropical Geometry

    Organizers: Alicia Dickenstein* (U Buenos Aires), Eva Maria Feichtner* (U Bremen)

    The aim of this workshop is to introduce advanced graduate students and postdocs to tropical geometry. Various aspects of this multi-faceted field will be highlighted in two short-courses comprising lectures and exercise/discussion sessions as well as in research talks. The workshop will thus provide the participants with
    an excellent introduction to the forthcoming events of the program. The scientific part will be complemented by a round table discussion on career issues of female mathematicians.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 02:51 PM PDT
  207. Program Tropical Geometry

    Organizers: Eva-Maria Feichtner *(University of Bremen), Ilia Itenberg (Institut de Recherche Mathématique Avancée de Strasbourg), Grigory Mikhalkin (Université de Genève), and Bernd Sturmfels (UCB - University of California, Berkeley)

    Tropical Geometry is the algebraic geometry over the min-plus algebra. It is a young subject that in recent years has both established itself as an area of its own right and unveiled its deep connections to numerous branches of pure and applied mathematics. From an algebraic geometric point of view, algebraic varieties over a field with non-archimedean valuation are replaced by polyhedral complexes, thereby retaining much of the information about the original varieties. From the point of view of complex geometry, the geometric combinatorial structure of tropical varieties is a maximal degeneration of a complex structure on a manifold.

    The tropical transition from objects of algebraic geometry to the polyhedral realm is an extension of the classical theory of toric varieties. It opens problems on algebraic varieties to a completely new set of techniques, and has already led to remarkable results in Enumerative Algebraic Geometry, Dynamical Systems and Computational Algebra, among other fields, and to applications in Algebraic Statistics and Statistical Physics.

    Updated on Mar 31, 2014 12:47 PM PDT
  208. Program Symplectic and Contact Geometry and Topology

    Organizers: Yakov Eliashberg *(Stanford University), John Etnyre (Georgia Institute of Technology), Eleny-Nicoleta Ionel (Stanford University), Dusa McDuff (Barnard College), and Paul Seidel (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

    In the slightly more than two decades that have elapsed since the fields of Symplectic and Contact Topology were created, the field has grown enormously and unforeseen new connections within Mathematics and Physics have been found. The goals of the 2009-10 program at MSRI are to:
    I. Promote the cross-pollination of ideas between different areas of symplectic and contact geometry;
    II. Help assess and formulate the main outstanding fundamental problems and directions in the field;
    III. Lead to new breakthroughs and solutions of some of the main problems in the area;
    IV. Discover new applications of symplectic and contact geometry in mathematics and physics;
    V. Educate a new generation of young mathematicians, giving them a broader view of the subject and the capability to employ techniques from different areas in their research.

    Updated on Apr 19, 2014 09:30 PM PDT
  209. Workshop Introductory Workshop: Symplectic and Contact Geometry and Topology

    Organizers: John Etnyre* (Georgia Institute of Technology), Dusa McDuff (Barnard College, Columbia University), and Lisa Traynor (Bryn Mawr).

    This workshop aims both to introduce
    people to a broad swath of the field
    and to frame its most important problems.
    Each day will be organized around a
    basic topic, such as how to count holomorphic
    curves with boundary on a Lagrangian submanifold (which
    leads to various versions of Floer theory)
    or how to understand the general structure of
    symplectic and contact manifolds.
    There will also be an introduction to the
    analytic and algebraic aspects of symplectic
    field theory, and a discussion of some applications.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 02:51 PM PDT
  210. Workshop Connections for Women: Symplectic and Contact Geometry and Topology

    Organizers: Eleny Ionel (Stanford University), Dusa McDuff* (Barnard College, Columbia University).

    This will form a bridge between
    the graduate student workshop which will just be ending and
    the Introductory workshop. After some
    elementary talks describing some of the main questions
    in the field, there will be an extended discussion session
    intended to explain basic concepts to those unfamiliar with the area.
    There will also be an opportunity for young researchers in the field
    to present their work, and an evening social event.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 11:05 AM PDT
  211. Summer Graduate School Summer Graduate Workshop: Symplectic and Contact Geometry and Topology

    Organizers: John Etnyre (Georgia Institute of Technology), Dusa McDuff* (Barnard College, Columbia University) and Lisa Traynor (Bryn Mawr College).

    Symplectic and Contact Topology has undergone rapid and exciting growth
    in the past few decades and is currently a rich subject, employing a variety of diverse techniques and touching on many areas of mathematics, such as algebraic and differential geometry, dynamical systems and low dimensional topology. This workshop is intended both for graduate students new to the
    area and for those working in the field.
    Lectures in the first week will introduce participants to basic topological, geometric and analytic techniques, including J-holomorphic curves. The second week will discuss applications to symplectic geometry and to 3-dimensional topology and knot theory. A variety of discussion
    sessions in the afternoon will cater to the differing interests of the students. Participants may consider staying for the Connections for Women and/or the Introductory workshop to the year long Symplectic Geometry program that starts just after this workshop.

    Updated on Mar 18, 2014 04:32 PM PDT
  212. Summer Graduate School Computational Theory of Real Reductive Groups (Salt lake City)

    Organizers: Jeffrey Adams (University of Maryland) , Peter Trapa* (University of Utah), Susana Salamanca (New Mexico State University), John Stembridge (University of Michigan), and David Vogan (MIT).

    The structure of real reductive algebraic groups is controlled by a remarkably simple combinatorial framework, generalizing the presentation of Coxeter groups by generators and relations. This framework in turn makes much of the infinite-dimensional representation theory of such groups amenable to computation.

    The Atlas of Lie Groups and Representations project is devoted to looking at representation theory from this computationally informed perspective. The group (particularly Fokko du Cloux and Marc van Leeuwen) has written computer software aimed at supporting research in the field, and at helping those who want to learn the subject.

    The workshop will explore this point of view in lecture series aimed especially at graduate students and postdocs with only a modest background (such as the representation theory of compact Lie groups).

    Deadline for funding applications: 1 March, 2009.

    The official workshop website is at: http://www.liegroups.org/workshop/

    Updated on Nov 26, 2008 06:58 AM PST
  213. Summer Graduate School Inverse Problems

    Organizers: Gunther Uhlmann* (University of Washington).

    Inverse Problems are problems where causes for a desired or an observed effect are to be determined. They lie at the heart of scientific inquiry and technological development. Applications include a number of medical as well as other imaging techniques, location of oil and mineral deposits in the earth's substructure, creation of astrophysical images from telescope data, finding cracks and interfaces within materials, shape optimization, model identification in growth processes and, more recently, modelling in the life sciences.

    The workshop will consist of several minicourses addressing several of the theoretical and practical issues arising in inverse problems including boundary rigidity and travel time tomography, cloaking and invisibility, electrical impedance imaging, statistical methods and biological applications, thermoacoustic and x-ray tomography, and resonances.

    Updated on Sep 11, 2013 10:55 AM PDT
  214. Summer Graduate School Random Matrix theory

    Organizers: Jinho Baik ( University of Michigan), Percy Deift* (New York University),Toufic Suidan (University of Arizona), Brian Rider (University of Colorado)

    The goal of this workshop is two-fold: (1) to describe many of the recent advances that have been made in the application of random matrix theory to problems in mathematics and physics (2) to develop some of the mathematical tools that are needed to enter the field. Applications of random matrix theory are now being made to number theory, combinatorics, statistical physics and statistics amongst other fields. The techniques employed in the field include methods from integrable systems, combinatorics, complex analysis, orthogonal polynomials and of course random matrix theory per se.

    Updated on Oct 17, 2013 06:10 PM PDT
  215. MSRI-UP MSRI-UP 2009: Coding Theory

    Organizers: Duane Cooper (Morehouse College), Suzanne Weekes (Worcester Polytechnic Insitute), Ricardo Cortez (Tulane University), Ivelisse Rubio (University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras) and Herbert Medina (Loyola Marymount University).

    The MSRI-UP is a comprehensive program for undergraduates that aims at increasing the number of students from underrepresented groups in mathematics graduate programs. MSRI-UP includes summer research opportunities, mentoring, workshops on the graduate school application process, and follow-up support.

    Updated on May 02, 2013 05:33 PM PDT
  216. Summer Graduate School Toric Varieties

    Organizers: David Cox ( Amherst College) and Hal Schenck (University of Illinois)

    Toric varieties are algebraic varieties defined by combinatorial data, and there is a wonderful interplay between algebra, combinatorics and geometry involved in their study. Many of the key concepts of abstract algebraic geometry (for example, constructing a variety by gluing affine pieces) have very concrete interpretations in the toric case, making toric varieties an ideal tool for introducing students to abstruse concepts.

    Updated on Apr 22, 2014 12:18 PM PDT
  217. Workshop Algebraic Geometry: Last Week of Program

    Organizers: William Fulton (University of Michigan), Joe Harris (Harvard University), Brendan Hassett (Rice University), János Kollár (Princeton University), Sándor Kovács* (University of Washington), Robert Lazarsfeld (University of Michigan), and Ravi Vakil (Stanford University)

    Updated on Apr 22, 2014 12:18 PM PDT
  218. Workshop Modern Perspectives in Applied Mathematics

    Organizers: Andrea L. Bertozzi (University of CaliforniaLosAngeles), Panagiotis Souganidis (The University of Chicago), and Eric Vanden-Eijnden (NewYorkUniversity)

    Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York


     

    Stochastic and multi-scale modeling is becoming a main driving force in many scientific and engineering disciplines, and is a mong the most exciting areas of scientific research. Indeed, many problems in sciences involve quantifying the behavior of complex systems with a very large number of degrees of freedom. The systems interact on al arge span of scales and require to incorporate stochastic effects to account for model errors and/or disturbances from under-resolvedscales.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 02:50 PM PDT
  219. Workshop Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2009: Teaching Undergraduates Mathematics

    Organizers: William McCallum (The University of Arizona), Deborah Loewenberg Ball (University of Michigan), Rikki Blair (Lakeland Comminity College, Ohio), David Bressoud (Macalester College), Amy Cohen-Corwin (Rutgers University), Don Goldberg (El Camino College), Jim Lewis (University of Nebraska), Robert Megginson (University of Michigan), Bob Moses (The Algebra Project), James Donaldson (Howard University),

    Teaching Undergraduates Mathematics will be the sixth in a series of Critical Issues in Education workshops hosted by the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute (MSRI) in Berkeley, CA. Whereas previous workshops focused on K-12 education and teacher education, this workshop will focus on undergraduate education.

    Updated on Sep 11, 2013 05:31 PM PDT
  220. Workshop Economic Games and Mechanisms to Address Climate Change

    Organizers: Rene Carmona (Princeton), Prajit Dutta (Columbia), Chris Jones (University of North Carolina), Roy Radner (NYU), and David Zetland (UC Berkeley).

    Themes: Carbon cap-and-trade and economic consequences; Game theory and self-enforcing treaties; Economic mechanisms and incentive for greenhouse gas emission reductions.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 11:18 AM PDT
  221. Workshop Great Circles 2009

    Organizers: Matthias Beck (San Francisco State University), Amanda Serenevy (Executive Director of the Riverbed Community Math Center), Sam Vandervelde (St. Lawrence University), and Kathy O'Hara (MSRI)

    This conference will bring together experienced math circle directors and professional mathematicians along with secondary school teachers and students, with the three- fold goal of inspiring and equipping individuals to begin math circles in their communities, passing along successful math circle presentations and best practices in math circle administration, and renewing and strengthening ties among members of the existing math circle network.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 01:57 PM PDT
  222. Workshop Mathematical Genomics

    Organizers: David Galas (Institute for Systems Biology), Richard Olshen (Co-chair) (Stanford University), Rick Woychik (The Jackson Laboratory), Nancy Zhang (Co-chair) (Stanford University)

    The goal of the conference is to bring individuals from genetics and the mathematical sciences into closer contact so that they might share objectives and skills needed to advance both areas, and especially their intersection.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 11:16 AM PDT
  223. Seminar Postdoc Seminar

    Updated on May 13, 2013 11:01 PM PDT
  224. Workshop Combinatorial, Enumerative and Toric Geometry

    Organizers: Michel Brion (U. de Genoble), Anders Buch (Rutgers U.), Linda Chen (Ohio State U.), William Fulton (U. Michigan), Sándor Kovács (U. Washington), Frank Sottile (Texas A&M), Harry Tamvakis (U. Maryland), and Burt Totaro (Cambridge U.)

    This workshop will present the state of the art in combinatorial, enumerative, and toric algebraic geometry. It
    will highlight this part of modern algebraic geometry within the context of the broader parent program at MSRI, and convey its scope to young researchers.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 02:50 PM PDT
  225. Workshop Sage Days: Algebraic Geometry

    Organizers: David Eisenbud (UC Berkeley), Daniel Erman (UC Berkeley), Dan Grayson (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), Mike Hansen (University of Washington), William Stein (University of Washington), Mike Stillman (Cornell University).

    This workshop features numerous hands on introductory tutorials about Sage, and the interface between Sage and Macaulay2. There were discussions and talks about doing algebraic geometry with both Sage and Macaulay2, and the unique advantages of both systems. There were also talks about working with lattice polytopes and doing Lie theory in Sage. In addition to the talks and tutorials, we had numerous coding sprints.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 02:50 PM PDT
  226. Workshop The Mathematical Association of America Sectional Meeting

    Organizers: Organized by: Dean Gooch (Santa Rosa Junior College), Tatiana Shubin (San Jose State University), Robert L. Bryant (MSRI), Steve Chiappari and Frank Farris (Santa Clara University) and Ed Keppelmann (University of Nevada Reno)

    As one of the MAAs most entertaining sections this meeting will be no exception. All the presentations will have plenty of rich mathematics accessible to students but equally engaging for seasoned veterans. The featured speakers are Robert Bryant (The idea of Holonomy), David Bressoud - MAA President Elect (The Story of the Alternating Sign Matrix Conjecture), Frank Farris - Editor Mathematics Magazine (A window to the 5th dimension), Kevin McCurley - Google Research (Information Modeling with Graphs), and Helene Barcelo - MSRI (Subspace Arrangements from a Combinatorial point of view). There will also be a student poster session, a luncheon, and plenty of time for catching up with old friends and colleagues.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 11:50 AM PDT
  227. Workshop Modern Moduli Theory

    Organizers: I. Coskun (U. Illinois - Chicago), S. Katz (U. Illinois), A. Marian (Institute for Advanced Study), R. Pandharipande (Princeton U.), R. Thomas (Imperial College), H.H. Tseng (U. Wisconsin), R. Vakil (Stanford U.)

    This workshop will convene experts specializing on the minimal model program, derived categories and moduli
    spaces in an informal environment to facilitate the cross-fertilization of ideas across these different fields of algebraic geometry.
     

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 02:50 PM PDT
  228. Seminar Postdoc Seminar

    Updated on May 13, 2013 11:01 PM PDT
  229. Workshop Macaulay2 day

    Organizers: Ravi Vakil (Stanford University), Gregory G. Smith (Queen's University) , Mike Stillman (Cornell University)

    Using Macaulay 2 in your research.

    The goal of the workshop is to help the participants use the Macaulay 2 software in their research. The first presentation will focus on installation, set-up, and basic functions.
    Participants are encouraged to bring their laptops to this session to get assistance with the software installation. The other independent talks will focus on different problems in algebraic geometry; likely topics include computing sheaf cohomology, intersection theory, and enumerative geometry. Each of these talks will also demonstrate the use of Macaulay 2.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 01:31 PM PDT
  230. Seminar AG Seminar

    Updated on May 13, 2013 11:00 PM PDT
  231. Workshop Classical Algebraic Geometry Today

    Organizers: Lucia Caporaso (U. Rome III), Brendan Hassett (Rice U.), James McKernan (MIT), Mircea Mustata (U. Michigan), Mihnea Popa (U. Illinois - Chicago)

    The main theme of the workshop will be to explore modern approaches to
    problems originating in Classical Algebraic Geometry, and at the same time
    offer an introduction to various subfields to the younger participants in
    the semester-long program.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 02:49 PM PDT
  232. Workshop Connections for Women: Algebraic Geometry and Related Fields

    Organizers: Angela Gibney (U. Pennsylvania), Brendan Hassett (Rice U.), Sándor Kovács (U. Washington), Diane Maclagan (Warwick U.) Jessica Sidman (Mt. Holyoke), and Ravi Vakil (Stanford U.)

    This workshop is part of the semester program on Algebraic Geometry, and
    additional funding will be available for participants to attend the associated
    "Introductory workshop: Classical algebraic geometry," January 26-30, 2009.

     

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 02:49 PM PDT
  233. Program Algebraic Geometry

    Organizers: William Fulton (University of Michigan), Joe Harris (Harvard University), Brendan Hassett (Rice University), János Kollár (Princeton University), Sándor Kovács* (University of Washington), Robert Lazarsfeld (University of Michigan), and Ravi Vakil (Stanford University)

    Updated on Apr 22, 2014 12:18 PM PDT
  234. Seminar Main Seminar

    Updated on May 13, 2013 11:01 PM PDT
  235. Seminar Postdoc seminar

    Updated on May 13, 2013 11:01 PM PDT
  236. Workshop Algebraic Statistics

    Organizers: Serkan Hosten (SFSU), Lior Pachter (UCB), Bernd Sturmfels (UCB)

    Algebraic statistics is a maturing discipline focused on the applications of algebraic geometry and its computational
    tools in the study of statistical models. Initial results in the area were related to specific problems in categorial data analysis and experimental design, however
    a flurry of activity during the past several years has greatly increased the scope of the subject. Areas of interest now include graphical models, maximum likelihood estimation and
    Bayesian methods. Moreover, a strong connection has developed to applications in the physical and biological sciences. The field draws its tools not only from computational
    algebraic geometry but also from tropical, convex, and information geometry. Moreover, research in algebraic statistics has led to new directions in those fields. The workshop
    will be a meeting point for students and leaders in the field. It will present a focused activity parallel to the 2008-2009 program on Algebraic Methods in Systems Biology and Statistics being hosted by
    the Statistical and Applied Mathematical Sciences Institute.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 02:49 PM PDT
  237. Workshop Using Partnerships to Strengthen Elementary Mathematics Teacher Education

    Organizers: Deborah Ball (University of Michigan), James Lewis (University of Nebraska), and William McCallum (University of Arizona)

    A core problem – perhaps the central problem – for improving elementary school mathematics is the mathematical education of elementary teachers. The historic isolation of elementary teachers’ study of mathematics from their pedagogical preparation is increasingly seen to be both unnatural and ineffective. Indeed, the mathematical education of elementary teachers is inherently interdisciplinary as future teachers seek to gain the mathematical knowledge, the pedagogical knowledge and the knowledge of young students that is needed to become a successful mathematics teacher. Thus, it seems reasonable that an integrative learning approach to mathematical education of elementary teachers could yield substantial benefits.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 01:57 PM PDT
  238. Workshop International Conference on Cluster Algebras and Related Topics

    Organizers: Christof Geiss (UNAM Ciudad Universitaria), Bernhard Keller (Université Paris Diderot - Paris 7), Idun Reiten (Nettstedskart Tilgjengelighet Norges Teknisk-Naturvitenskapelige Universite), Andrei Zelevinsky (Nostheastern University).

    Location: Morelia/Mexico City




    This is a combination of a conference and workshop on cluster algebras and their relations to geometry, representation theory and combinatorics. The workshop will take place in Morelia (a colonial town about 250km west of Mexico-City), December 8-13, 2008 followed by the conference in Mexico-City, December 15-20.

    The Research in this area developed with amazing speed after the introduction of cluster algebras around 2001 by Sergey Fomin and Andrei Zelevinsky and has attracted a variety of first rate mathematicians throughout the world, for instance Alexander Goncharov, Bernhard Keller, Maxim Kontsevich, Bernard Leclerc, Idun Reiten and Claus Michael Ringel, most of them being ICM speakers.

    A good way to get an overview of the intense activities related to cluster algebras is Sergey Fomin's cluster algebras portal:
    http://www.math.lsa.umich.edu/~fomin/cluster.html
    see also section below for some discussion of the impact of cluster algebras.

    This workshop website is at:
    http://www.matem.unam.mx/iconcart/

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 11:15 AM PDT
  239. Workshop Discrete Rigidity Phenomena in Additive Combinatorics

    Organizers: Ben Green (University of Cambridge), Bryna Kra (Northwestern University), Emmanuel Lesigne (University of Tours), Anthony Quas (University of Victoria), Mate Wierdl (University of Memphis)

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 02:47 PM PDT
  240. Workshop Promoting Diversity at the Graduate Level in Mathematics: a National Forum

    Organizers: Sylvia Bozeman (Spelman College), Rhonda Hughes (Bryn Mawr College), Abbe Herzig (SUNY, University at Albany), Duane Cooper (Morehouse College), Ellen Kirkman(Wake Forest University), Ivelisse Rubio (University of Puerto Rico), and Olivia Scriven (Spelman College). Honorary organizers include: Dusa McDuff ( SUNY Stonybrook and Barnard College), Fern Hunt (NIST), and Karen Uhlenbeck (U of Texas at Austin).

    Cultivating diversity and broadening participation of historically underrepresented groups in the mathematical sciences are national goals that are identified by the National Science Foundation as "essential components of the innovation engine that drives the Nation's economy." The goal of this three-day conference is to stimulate, identify, and disseminate successful models that imporve retention of underrepresented groups in graduate programs in mathematics.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 02:37 PM PDT