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Upcoming Scientific Events

  1. Seminar GTC Graduate Seminar

    Created on Aug 18, 2017 11:45 AM PDT
  2. Seminar GFA Main Seminar

    Created on Aug 18, 2017 11:53 AM PDT
  3. Seminar GFA Main Seminar

    Created on Aug 18, 2017 11:53 AM PDT
  4. Seminar GTC Main Seminar

    Created on Aug 18, 2017 11:50 AM PDT
  5. Workshop Women in Topology

    Organizers: Maria Basterra (University of New Hampshire), Kristine Bauer (University of Calgary), LEAD Kathryn Hess (École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL)), Brenda Johnson (Union College--Union University)

    The Women in Topology (WIT) network is an international group of female mathematicians interested in homotopy theory whose main goal is to increase the retention of women in the field by providing both unique collaborative research opportunities and mentorship between colleagues.  The MSRI WIT meeting will be organized as an afternoon of short talks from participants, followed by two days of open problem seminars and working groups designed to stimulate new collaborations, as well as to strengthen those already ongoing among the participants.

     

    Updated on Oct 23, 2017 11:58 AM PDT
  6. Seminar GTC Visions Seminar

    Updated on Sep 28, 2017 08:50 AM PDT
  7. Seminar UC Berkeley Colloquium:

    Created on Sep 29, 2017 09:49 AM PDT
  8. Seminar GFA Main Seminar

    Created on Aug 18, 2017 11:59 AM PDT
  9. Seminar GFA Main Seminar

    Created on Aug 18, 2017 11:58 AM PDT
  10. Seminar GTC Graduate Seminar

    Created on Aug 18, 2017 11:45 AM PDT
  11. Seminar GFA Main Seminar

    Created on Aug 18, 2017 11:53 AM PDT
  12. Seminar GFA Main Seminar

    Created on Aug 18, 2017 11:53 AM PDT
  13. Seminar GTC Main Seminar

    Created on Aug 18, 2017 11:50 AM PDT
  14. Seminar GTC Visions Seminar

    Updated on Sep 28, 2017 08:50 AM PDT
  15. Seminar GFA Main Seminar

    Created on Aug 18, 2017 11:59 AM PDT
  16. Seminar GFA Main Seminar

    Created on Aug 18, 2017 11:58 AM PDT
  17. Seminar GFA Postdoc Seminar

    Created on Aug 21, 2017 09:21 AM PDT
  18. Seminar GTC Postdoc Seminar

    Created on Aug 21, 2017 09:22 AM PDT
  19. Seminar GTC Graduate Seminar

    Created on Aug 18, 2017 11:45 AM PDT
  20. Seminar GTC Main Seminar

    Updated on Nov 01, 2017 09:18 AM PDT
  21. Seminar GFA Main Seminar

    Created on Aug 18, 2017 11:53 AM PDT
  22. Seminar GFA Main Seminar

    Created on Aug 18, 2017 11:53 AM PDT
  23. Seminar GTC Visions Seminar

    Updated on Sep 28, 2017 08:50 AM PDT
  24. Seminar GTC Main Seminar

    Created on Aug 18, 2017 11:50 AM PDT
  25. Seminar GFA Main Seminar

    Created on Aug 18, 2017 11:58 AM PDT
  26. Seminar GFA Main Seminar

    Created on Aug 18, 2017 11:59 AM PDT
  27. Seminar GFA Postdoc Seminar

    Created on Aug 21, 2017 09:21 AM PDT
  28. Seminar GTC Postdoc Seminar

    Created on Aug 21, 2017 09:22 AM PDT
  29. Program Group Representation Theory and Applications

    Organizers: Robert Guralnick (University of Southern California), Alexander Kleshchev (University of Oregon), Gunter Malle (TU Kaiserslautern), Gabriel Navarro (Universitat de Valencia), Julia Pevtsova (University of Washington), Raphael Rouquier (University of California, Los Angeles), LEAD Pham Tiep (Rutgers University)

    Group Representation Theory is a central area of Algebra, with important and deep connections to areas as varied as topology, algebraic geometry, number theory, Lie theory, homological algebra, and mathematical physics. Born more than a century ago, the area still abounds with basic problems and fundamental conjectures, some of which have been open for over five decades. Very recent breakthroughs have led to the hope that some of these conjectures can finally be settled. In turn, recent results in group representation theory have helped achieve substantial progress in a vast number of applications.

    The goal of the program is to investigate all these deep problems and the wealth of new results and directions, to obtain major progress in the area, and to explore further applications of group representation theory to other branches of mathematics.

    Updated on Mar 16, 2016 01:25 PM PDT
  30. Program Enumerative Geometry Beyond Numbers

    Organizers: Mina Aganagic (University of California, Berkeley), Denis Auroux (University of California, Berkeley), Jim Bryan (University of British Columbia), LEAD Andrei Okounkov (Columbia University), Balazs Szendroi (University of Oxford)

    Traditional enumerative geometry asks certain questions to which the expected answer is a number: for instance, the number of lines incident with two points in the plane (1, Euclid), or the number of twisted cubic curves on a quintic threefold (317 206 375). It has however been recognized for some time that the numerics is often just the tip of the iceberg: a deeper exploration reveals interesting geometric, topological, representation-, or knot-theoretic structures. This semester-long program will be devoted to these hidden structures behind enumerative invariants, concentrating on the core fields where these questions start: algebraic and symplectic geometry.

    Updated on Oct 12, 2015 03:39 PM PDT
  31. Workshop Connections for Women: Enumerative Geometry Beyond Numbers

    Organizers: Barbara Fantechi (Sissa), LEAD Chiu-Chu Melissa Liu (Columbia University)

    This two-day workshop will provide an overview of significant developments and open problems in modern enumerative geometry, from the perspectives of both algebraic geometry and symplectic topology. 

    This workshop is open to all mathematicians.

    Updated on Jul 30, 2017 11:34 PM PDT
  32. Workshop Introductory Workshop: Enumerative Geometry Beyond Numbers

    Organizers: Denis Auroux (University of California, Berkeley), LEAD Chiu-Chu Melissa Liu (Columbia University), Andrei Okounkov (Columbia University)

    This workshop will consist of expository mini-courses and lectures introducing various aspects of modern enumerative geometry, among which: enumeration via intersection theory on moduli spaces of curves or sheaves, including Gromov-Witten and Donaldson-Thomas invariants; motivic and K-theoretic refinement of these invariants; and categorical invariants (derived categories of coherent sheaves, Fukaya categories).

    Updated on Jul 30, 2017 11:34 PM PDT
  33. Workshop Connections for Women: Group Representation Theory and Applications

    Organizers: Karin Erdmann (University of Oxford), Julia Pevtsova (University of Washington)

    This intensive two day workshop will introduce graduate students and recent PhD’s to some current topics of research in Representation Theory. It will consists of a mixture of survey talks on the hot topics in the area given by leading experts and research talks by junior mathematicians covering subjects such as new developments in character theory, group cohomology, representations of Lie algebras and algebraic groups, geometric representation theory, and categorification. 

    This workshop is open to all mathematicians.

    Updated on Aug 08, 2017 01:13 PM PDT
  34. Workshop Introductory Workshop: Group Representation Theory and Applications

    Organizers: Robert Guralnick (University of Southern California), Gunter Malle (TU Kaiserslautern)

    The workshop will survey various important and active areas of the representation theory of finite and algebraic groups, and introduce the audience to several basic open problems in the area. It will consist of 6 series of 3 lectures each given by top experts in the field. The lectures are designed for a diverse audience and will be accessible to non-specialists and graduate students with some background in representation theory. Topics covered include Representation theory of algebraic groups, Decomposition numbers of finite groups of Lie type, Deligne-Lusztig theory,  Block theory, Categorification, and Local-global-conjectures.

    Updated on Jul 30, 2017 11:34 PM PDT
  35. Seminar The Bowen Lectures

    Created on Aug 21, 2017 02:36 PM PDT
  36. Seminar The Bowen Lectures

    Created on Aug 21, 2017 02:36 PM PDT
  37. Seminar The Bowen Lectures

    Created on Aug 21, 2017 02:36 PM PDT
  38. Workshop Latinx in the Mathematical Sciences Conference 2018

    Organizers: Federico Ardila (San Francisco State University), Ricardo Cortez (Tulane University), Tatiana Toro (University of Washington), Mariel Vazquez (University of California, Davis)

    On March 8-10, 2018, IPAM will host a conference showcasing the achievements of Latinx in the mathematical sciences. The goal of the conference is to encourage Latinx to pursue careers in the mathematical sciences, to promote the advancement of Latinx currently in the discipline, to showcase research being conducted by Latinx at the forefront of their fields, and, finally, to build a community around shared academic interests. The conference will be held on the UCLA campus in Los Angeles, CA. It will begin at noon on Thursday, March 8.

    This conference is sponsored by the Mathematical Sciences Institutes Diversity Initiative, with funding from the National Science Foundation Division of Mathematical Sciences.

    Updated on Oct 23, 2017 04:53 PM PDT
  39. Workshop Hot Topics: The Homological Conjectures

    Organizers: Bhargav Bhatt (University of Michigan), Srikanth Iyengar (University of Utah), Wieslawa Niziol (CNRS, ENS-Lyon), LEAD Anurag Singh (University of Utah)

    The homological conjectures in commutative algebra are a network of conjectures that have generated a tremendous amount of activity in the last 50 years. They had largely been resolved for commutative rings that contain a field, but, with the exception of some low dimensional cases, several remained open in mixed characteristic --- until recently, when Yves André announced a proof of Hochster's Direct Summand Conjecture. The progress comes from systematically applying Scholze's theory of perfectoid spaces, which had already shown its value by solving formidable problems in number theory and representation theory. One of the goals of the workshop is to cover the ingredients going into the proofs of the Direct Summand Conjecture.

    Updated on Sep 25, 2017 12:01 PM PDT
  40. Workshop Structures in Enumerative Geometry

    Organizers: Mina Aganagic (University of California, Berkeley), Jim Bryan (University of British Columbia), LEAD Davesh Maulik (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Balazs Szendroi (University of Oxford), Richard Thomas (Imperial College, London)

    The purpose of the workshop is to bring together specialists to work on understanding the many-faceted mathematical structures underlying problems in enumerative geometry. Topics represented at the workshop will include: geometric representation theory, supersymmetric gauge theory, string theory, knot theory, and derived geometry, all of which have had a profound effect on the development of modern enumerative geometry.

    Updated on Nov 08, 2017 09:17 AM PST
  41. Workshop Representations of Finite and Algebraic Groups

    Organizers: Robert Guralnick (University of Southern California), Alexander Kleshchev (University of Oregon), Gunter Malle (TU Kaiserslautern), Gabriel Navarro (Universitat de Valencia), LEAD Pham Tiep (Rutgers University)

    The workshop will bring together key researchers working in various areas of Group Representation Theory to strengthen the interaction and collaboration between them and to make further progress on a number of basic problems and conjectures in the field. Topics of the workshop include
    -- Global-local conjectures in the representation theory of finite groups
    -- Representations and cohomology of simple, algebraic and finite groups
    -- Connections to Lie theory and categorification, and
    -- Applications to group theory, number theory, algebraic geometry, and combinatorics.

    Updated on Nov 16, 2017 09:43 AM PST
  42. Workshop The 2018 Infinite Possibilities Conference

    Organizers: Alejandra Alvarado (Eastern Illinois University), Hélène Barcelo (MSRI - Mathematical Sciences Research Institute), Rebecca Garcia (Sam Houston State University), LEAD Lily Khadjavi (Loyola Marymount University), Candice Price (University of San Diego), Kimberly Sellers (Georgetown University), Kimberly Weems (North Carolina Central University), Ulrica Wilson (Morehouse College; Institute for Computational and Experimental Research in Mathematics (ICERM))
    Ipc_logo_alt

    The Infinite Possibilities Conference (IPC) is a national conference that is designed to promote, educate, encourage and support underrepresented women interested in mathematics and statistics. While a number of workshops and conferences in the mathematical sciences work to increase awareness of issues of underrepresentation with respect to race/ethnicity or to gender, there is a lack of programming designed to address both. Through a lively series of panels, plenary sessions, research presentations, and workshops, IPC addresses issues including:  the sharing of professional advice and mentoring; the sharing of research in a supportive environment; the need to counteract isolation; and the need for visible role models. 

    Updated on Nov 17, 2017 04:18 PM PST
  43. Seminar Seminar Sequence

    Created on Aug 31, 2017 03:27 PM PDT
  44. Summer Graduate School The ∂-Problem in the Twenty-First Century

    Organizers: Debraj Chakrabarti (Central Michigan University), Jeffery McNeal (Ohio State University)

    This Summer Graduate School will introduce students to the modern theory of the  inhomogeneous Cauchy-Riemann equation, the fundamental partial differential equation of Complex Analysis. This theory uses powerful tools of partial differential equations, differential geometry and functional analysis to obtain a refined understanding of holomorphic functions on complex manifolds. Besides students planning to work in complex analysis, this course will be valuable to those planning to study partial differential equations, complex differential and algebraic geometry, and operator theory. The exposition will be self-contained and the prerequisites will be kept at a minimum

    Updated on Jul 20, 2017 11:48 AM PDT
  45. Program Summer Research for Women in Mathematics

    Organizers: Hélène Barcelo (MSRI - Mathematical Sciences Research Institute)

    The purpose of the MSRI's program, Summer Research for Women in Mathematics, is to provide space and funds to groups of women mathematicians to work on a research project at MSRI. Research projects can arise from work initiated at a Women's Conference, or can be freestanding activities.

    Updated on Nov 06, 2017 02:34 PM PST
  46. Summer Graduate School Séminaire de Mathématiques Supérieures 2018: Derived Geometry and Higher Categorical Structures in Geometry and Physics

    Organizers: Anton Alekseev (Université de Genève), Ruxandra Moraru (University of Waterloo), Chenchang Zhu (Universität Göttingen)

    Higher categorical structures and homotopy methods have made significant influence on geometry in recent years. This summer school is aimed at transferring these ideas and fundamental technical tools to the next generation of mathematicians.

    The summer school will focus on the following four topics:  higher categorical structures in geometry, derived geometry, factorization algebras, and their application in physics.  There will be eight to ten mini courses on these topics, including mini courses led by Chirs Brav, Kevin Costello, Jacob Lurie, and Ezra Getzler. The prerequisites will be kept at a minimum, however, a introductory courses in differential geometry, algebraic topology and abstract algebra are recommended.

    Updated on Oct 11, 2017 10:49 AM PDT
  47. MSRI-UP MSRI-UP 2018: The Mathematics of Data Science

    Organizers: Federico Ardila (San Francisco State University), Duane Cooper (Morehouse College), LEAD Maria Mercedes Franco (Queensborough Community College (CUNY)), Rebecca Garcia (Sam Houston State University), David Uminsky (University of San Francisco), Suzanne Weekes (Worcester Polytechnic Institute)

    The MSRI-UP summer program is designed to serve a diverse group of undergraduate students who would like to conduct research in the mathematical sciences.

    In 2018, MSRI-UP will focus on the core role of (linear) algebra in current research and application areas of Data Science ranging from unsupervised learning, clustering and networks, to algebraic signal processing and feature extraction, to the central role linear algebra plays in deep machine learning.  The research program will be led by Dr. David Uminsky, Associate Professor of Mathematics and Statistics at the University of San Francisco.

    Updated on Nov 01, 2017 02:09 PM PDT
  48. Summer Graduate School Mathematical Analysis of Behavior

    Organizers: Ann Hermundstad (Janelia Research Campus, HHMI), Vivek Jayaraman (Janelia Research Campus, HHMI), Eva Kanso (University of Southern California), L. Mahadevan (Harvard University)

    Explore Outstanding Phenomena in Animal Behavior

    Jointly hosted by Janelia and the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute (MSRI), this program will bring together 15-20 advanced PhD students with complementary expertise who are interested in working at the interface of mathematics and biology. Emphasis will be placed on linking behavior to neural dynamics and exploring the coupling between these processes and the natural sensory environment of the organism. The aim is to educate a new type of global scientist that will work collaboratively in tackling complex problems in cellular, circuit and behavioral biology by combining experimental and computational techniques with rigorous mathematics and physics.

    Updated on Sep 29, 2017 09:49 AM PDT
  49. Summer Graduate School H-principle

    Organizers: Emmy Murphy (Northwestern University), Takashi Tsuboi (University of Tokyo)
    072_04-small
    The image of a large sphere isometrically embedded into a small space through a C^1 embedding. (Attributions: E. Bartzos, V. Borrelli, R. Denis, F. Lazarus, D. Rohmer, B. Thibert)

    This two week summer school will introduce graduate students to the theory of h-principles.  After building up the theory from basic smooth topology, we will focus on more recent developments of the theory, particularly applications to symplectic and contact geometry, and foliation theory.

    Updated on Nov 02, 2017 10:19 AM PDT
  50. Summer Graduate School Derived Categories

    Organizers: Nicolas Addington (University of Oregon), LEAD Alexander Polishchuk (University of Oregon)

    The goal of the school is to give an introduction to basic techniques for working with derived categories, with an emphasis on the derived categories of coherent sheaves on algebraic varieties. A particular goal will be to understand Orlov’s equivalence relating the derived category of a projective hypersurface with matrix factorizations of the corresponding polynomial.

    Updated on Jul 20, 2017 12:29 PM PDT
  51. Summer Graduate School IAS/PCMI 2018: Harmonic Analysis

    Organizers: Carlos Kenig (University of Chicago), Fanghua Lin (New York University, Courant Institute), Svitlana Mayboroda (University of Minnesota, Twin Cities), Tatiana Toro (University of Washington)

    Harmonic analysis is a central field of mathematics with a number of applications to geometry, partial differential equations, probability, and number theory, as well as physics, biology, and engineering. The Graduate Summer School will feature mini-courses in geometric measure theory, homogenization, localization, free boundary problems, and partial differential equations as they apply to questions in or draw techniques from harmonic analysis. The goal of the program is to bring together students and researchers at all levels interested in these areas to share exciting recent developments in these subjects, stimulate further interactions, and inspire the new generation to pursue research in harmonic analysis and its applications.

    Updated on Nov 08, 2017 11:32 AM PST
  52. Summer Graduate School Representations of High Dimensional Data

    Organizers: Blake Hunter (Claremont McKenna College), Deanna Needell (University of California, Los Angeles)
    Image

    In today's world, data is exploding at a faster rate than computer architectures can handle. This summer school will introduce students to modern and innovative mathematical techniques that address this phenomenon. Hands-on topics will include data mining, compression, classification, topic modeling, large-scale stochastic optimization, and more.

    Updated on Nov 02, 2017 10:02 AM PDT
  53. Summer Graduate School From Symplectic Geometry to Chaos

    Organizers: Marcel Guardia (Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya), Vadim Kaloshin (University of Maryland), Leonid Polterovich (Tel Aviv University)

    The purpose of the summer school is to introduce graduate students to state-of-the-art methods and results in Hamiltonian systems and symplectic geometry. We focus on recent developments on the study of chaotic motion in Hamiltonian systems and its applications to models in Celestial Mechanics.

    Updated on Oct 03, 2017 01:40 PM PDT
  54. Program Hamiltonian systems, from topology to applications through analysis

    Organizers: Rafael de la Llave (Georgia Institute of Technology), LEAD Albert Fathi (Georgia Institute of Technology; École Normale Supérieure de Lyon), Vadim Kaloshin (University of Maryland), Robert Littlejohn (University of California, Berkeley), Philip Morrison (University of Texas at Austin), Tere Seara (Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya), Sergei Tabachnikov (Pennsylvania State University), Amie Wilkinson (University of Chicago)

    The interdisciplinary nature of Hamiltonian systems is deeply ingrained in its history. Therefore the program will bring together the communities of mathematicians with the community of practitioners, mainly engineers, physicists, and theoretical chemists who use Hamiltonian systems daily. The program will cover not only the mathematical aspects of Hamiltonian systems but also their applications, mainly in space mechanics, physics and chemistry.

    The mathematical aspects comprise celestial mechanics, variational methods, relations with PDE, Arnold diffusion and computation. The applications concern celestial mechanics, astrodynamics, motion of satellites, plasma physics, accelerator physics, theoretical chemistry, and atomic physics.

    The goal of the program is to bring to the forefront both the theoretical aspects and the applications, by making available for applications the latest theoretical developments, and also by nurturing the theoretical mathematical aspects with new problems that come from concrete problems of applications.

    Updated on Jul 13, 2017 12:19 PM PDT
  55. Workshop Connections for Women: Hamiltonian Systems, from topology to applications through analysis

    Organizers: Marie-Claude Arnaud (Université d'Avignon), LEAD Basak Gurel (University of Central Florida), Tere Seara (Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya)
    330px-std-map-0.971635
    Representing the orbits of the standard map for K = 1.2

    This workshop will feature lectures on a variety of topics in Hamiltonian dynamics given by leading researchers in the area. The talks will focus on recent developments in subjects closely related to the program such as Arnold diffusion, celestial mechanics, Hamilton-Jacobi equations, KAM methods, Aubry-Mather theory and symplectic topological techniques, and on applications. The workshop is open to all mathematicians in areas related to the program.

    Updated on Nov 08, 2017 10:19 AM PST
  56. Workshop Introductory Workshop: Hamiltonian systems, from topology to applications through analysis

    Organizers: Marie-Claude Arnaud (Université d'Avignon), Wilfrid Gangbo (University of California, Los Angeles), LEAD Vadim Kaloshin (University of Maryland), Robert Littlejohn (University of California, Berkeley)

    The introductory workshop will cover the large variety of topics of the semester: weak KAM theory, Mather theory, Hamilton-Jacobi equations, integrable systems and integrable planar billiards, instability formation for nearly integrable systems, celestial mechanics, billiards, spectral rigidity, Astrodynamics, motion of satellites, Plasma Physics, Accelerator Physics, Theoretical Chemistry, and Atomic Physics.

    The workshop will consist of approximately 18 lectures to introduce the main topics relevant to the semester. That will leave time for discussions and exchange between the participants.

    Updated on Sep 26, 2017 09:18 AM PDT
  57. Workshop Hamiltonian systems, from topology to applications through analysis I

    Organizers: Alessandra Celletti (University of Rome Tor Vergata), Rafael de la Llave (Georgia Institute of Technology), Diego Del-Castillo-Negrete (Oak Ridge National Laboratory), Lawrence Evans (University of California, Berkeley), LEAD Philip Morrison (University of Texas at Austin), Sergei Tabachnikov (Pennsylvania State University), Amie Wilkinson (University of Chicago)
    Web-image
    Depiction of the standard nontwist map (courtesy of G.Miloshevich).

    This is a main workshop of the program “Hamiltonian systems, from topology to applications through analysis” and is a companion to the workshop next month (November 26-30).  Both workshops will feature current developments pertaining to finite and infinite-dimensional Hamiltonian systems, with a mix of rigorous theory and applications.  A broad range of topics will be included, e.g., existence of and transport about invariant sets (Arnold diffusion, KAM, etc.),  techniques for projection/reduction of infinite to finite systems, and the role of topological invariants in applications.

    Updated on Nov 02, 2017 09:56 AM PDT
  58. Workshop Hamiltonian systems, from topology to applications through analysis II

    Organizers: Alessandra Celletti (University of Rome Tor Vergata), Rafael de la Llave (Georgia Institute of Technology), Diego Del-Castillo-Negrete (Oak Ridge National Laboratory), Lawrence Evans (University of California, Berkeley), Philip Morrison (University of Texas at Austin), Sergei Tabachnikov (Pennsylvania State University), Amie Wilkinson (University of Chicago)
    Web-image
    An invariant set inhibiting transport in a two degree-of-freedom Hamiltonian system (courtesy J. D. Szezech)

    This is a main workshop of the program “Hamiltonian systems, from topology to applications through analysis.”  It  will feature current developments pertaining to finite and infinite-dimensional Hamiltonian systems, with a mix of rigorous theory and applications.  A broad range of topics will be included, e.g., existence of and transport about invariant sets (Arnold diffusion, KAM, etc.),  techniques for projection/reduction of infinite to finite systems, and the role of topological invariants in applications.

    Updated on Nov 02, 2017 09:58 AM PDT
  59. Program Birational Geometry and Moduli Spaces

    Organizers: Antonella Grassi (University of Pennsylvania), LEAD Christopher Hacon (University of Utah), Sándor Kovács (University of Washington), Mircea Mustaţă (University of Michigan), Martin Olsson (University of California, Berkeley)

    Birational Geometry and Moduli Spaces are two important areas of Algebraic Geometry that have recently witnessed a flurry of activity and substantial progress on many fundamental open questions. In this program we aim to  bring together key researchers in these and related areas to highlight the recent exciting progress and to explore future avenues of research.
     
    This program will focus on the following themes: Geometry and Derived Categories, Birational Algebraic Geometry, Moduli Spaces of Stable Varieties, Geometry in Characteristic p>0, and Applications of Algebraic Geometry: Elliptic Fibrations of Calabi-Yau Varieties in Geometry, Arithmetic and the Physics of String Theory

    Updated on Jan 31, 2017 07:46 PM PST
  60. Program Derived Algebraic Geometry

    Organizers: Julie Bergner (University of Virginia), LEAD Bhargav Bhatt (University of Michigan), Dennis Gaitsgory (Harvard University), David Nadler (University of California, Berkeley), Nikita Rozenblyum (University of Chicago), Peter Scholze (Universität Bonn), Gabriele Vezzosi (Università di Firenze)

    Derived algebraic geometry is an extension of algebraic geometry that provides a convenient framework for directly treating non-generic geometric situations (such as non-transverse intersections in intersection theory), in lieu of the more traditional perturbative approaches (such as the “moving” lemma). This direct approach, in addition to being conceptually satisfying, has the distinct advantage of preserving the symmetries of the situation, which makes it much more applicable. In particular, in recent years, such techniques have found applications in diverse areas of mathematics, ranging from arithmetic geometry, mathematical physics, geometric representation theory, and homotopy theory. This semester long program will be dedicated to exploring these directions further, and finding new connections.

    Updated on Nov 02, 2016 04:30 PM PDT
  61. Workshop Connections for Women: Derived Algebraic Geometry, Birational Geometry and Moduli Spaces

    Organizers: Julie Bergner (University of Virginia), LEAD Antonella Grassi (University of Pennsylvania), Bianca Viray (University of Washington), Kirsten Wickelgren (Georgia Institute of Technology)

    This workshop will be on different aspects of Algebraic Geometry relating Derived Algebraic Geometry and Birational Geometry. In particular the workshop will focus on connections to other branches of mathematics and open problems. There will be some colloquium style lectures as well as shorter research talks. The workshop is open to all.

    Updated on Jul 30, 2017 11:34 PM PDT
  62. Workshop Introductory Workshop: Derived Algebraic Geometry and Birational Geometry and Moduli Spaces

    Organizers: Julie Bergner (University of Virginia), Bhargav Bhatt (University of Michigan), Christopher Hacon (University of Utah), LEAD Mircea Mustaţă (University of Michigan), Gabriele Vezzosi (Università di Firenze)

    The workshop will survey several areas of algebraic geometry, providing an introduction to the two main programs hosted by MSRI in Spring 2019. It will consist of 7 expository mini-courses and 7 separate lectures, each given by top experts in the field. 

    The focus of the workshop will be the recent progress in derived algebraic geometry, birational geometry and moduli spaces. The lectures will be aimed at a wide audience including advanced graduate students and postdocs with a background in algebraic geometry.
     

    Updated on Aug 28, 2017 09:13 AM PDT
  63. Workshop Derived algebraic geometry and its applications

    Organizers: Dennis Gaitsgory (Harvard University), David Nadler (University of California, Berkeley), LEAD Nikita Rozenblyum (University of Chicago), Peter Scholze (Universität Bonn), Brooke Shipley (University of Illinois at Chicago), Bertrand Toen (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS))

    This workshop will bring together researchers at various frontiers, including arithmetic geometry, representation theory, mathematical physics, and homotopy theory, where derived algebraic geometry has had recent impact. The aim will be to explain the ideas and tools behind recent progress and to advertise appealing questions. A focus will be on moduli spaces, for example of principal bundles with decorations as arise in many settings, and their natural structures.    

    Updated on Jul 30, 2017 11:34 PM PDT
  64. Workshop Recent Progress in Moduli Theory

    Organizers: Lucia Caporaso (University of Rome, Roma 3), LEAD Sándor Kovács (University of Washington), Martin Olsson (University of California, Berkeley)
    Moduli_b

    This workshop will be focused on presenting the latest developments in moduli theory, including (but not restricted to) recent advances in compactifications of moduli spaces of higher dimensional varieties, the birational geometry of moduli spaces, abstract methods including stacks, stability criteria, and applications in other disciplines. 

    Updated on Nov 02, 2017 09:59 AM PDT
  65. Program Holomorphic Differentials in Mathematics and Physics

    Organizers: LEAD Jayadev Athreya (University of Washington), Steven Bradlow (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), Sergei Gukov (California Institute of Technology), Andrew Neitzke (University of Texas), Anna Wienhard (Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg), Anton Zorich (Institut de Mathematiques de Jussieu)
    Quadmesh2
    Some holomorphic differentials on a genus 2 surface, with close up views of singular points, image courtesy Jian Jiang.

    Holomorphic differentials on Riemann surfaces have long held a distinguished place in low dimensional geometry, dynamics and representation theory. Recently it has become apparent that they constitute a common feature of several other highly active areas of current research in mathematics and also at the interface with physics. In some cases the areas themselves (such as stability conditions on Fukaya-type categories, links to quantum integrable systems, or the physically derived construction of so-called spectral networks) are new, while in others the novelty lies more in the role of the holomorphic differentials (for example in the study of billiards in polygons, special - Hitchin or higher Teichmuller - components of representation varieties, asymptotic properties of Higgs bundle moduli spaces, or in new interactions with algebraic geometry).

    It is remarkable how widely scattered are the motivating questions in these areas, and how diverse are the backgrounds of the researchers pursuing them. Bringing together experts in this wide variety of fields to explore common interests and discover unexpected connections is the main goal of our program. Our program will be of interest to those working in many different elds, including low-dimensional dynamical systems (via the connection to billiards); differential geometry (Higgs bundles and related moduli spaces); and different types of theoretical physics (electron transport and supersymmetric quantum field theory).

    Updated on Nov 09, 2017 09:57 AM PST
  66. Program Microlocal Analysis

    Organizers: Pierre Albin (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), Nalini Anantharaman (Université de Strasbourg), Kiril Datchev (Purdue University), Raluca Felea (Rochester Institute of Technology), Colin Guillarmou (École Normale Supérieure), LEAD Andras Vasy (Stanford University)
    315_image1

    Microlocal analysis provides tools for the precise analysis of problems arising in areas such as partial differential equations or integral geometry by working in the phase space, i.e. the cotangent bundle, of the underlying manifold. It has origins in areas such as quantum mechanics and hyperbolic equations, in addition to the development of a general PDE theory, and has expanded tremendously over the last 40 years to the analysis of singular spaces, integral geometry, nonlinear equations, scattering theory… This program will bring together researchers from various parts of the field to facilitate the transfer of ideas, and will also provide a comprehensive introduction to the field for postdocs and graduate students.

    Updated on Nov 09, 2017 10:01 AM PST
  67. Program Random and Arithmetic Structures in Topology

    Organizers: Nicolas Bergeron (Université de Paris VI (Pierre et Marie Curie)), Jeffrey Brock (Brown University), Alex Furman (University of Illinois at Chicago), Tsachik Gelander (Weizmann Institute of Science), Ursula Hamenstädt (Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn), Fanny Kassel (Institut des Hautes Études Scientifiques (IHES)), LEAD Alan Reid (Rice University)
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    The use of dynamical invariants has long been a staple of geometry and topology, from rigidity theorems, to classification theorems, to the general study of lattices and of the mapping class group. More recently, random structures in topology and notions of probabilistic geometric convergence have played a critical role in testing the robustness of conjectures in the arithmetic setting. The program will focus on invariants in topology, geometry, and the dynamics of group actions linked to random constructions.

    Updated on Nov 16, 2017 02:50 PM PST