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Upcoming Scientific Events

  1. Summer Graduate School An Introduction to Character Theory and the McKay Conjecture

    Organizers: Robert Guralnick (University of Southern California), Pham Tiep (University of Arizona)

    Character Theory of Finite Groups provides one of the most powerful tools to study groups. In this course we will give a gentle introduction to basic results in the Character Theory, as well as some of the main conjectures in Group Representation Theory, with particular emphasis on the McKay Conjecture.

    Updated on May 25, 2016 01:03 PM PDT
  2. Summer Graduate School Electronic Structure Theory

    Organizers: LEAD Lin Lin (University of California, Berkeley), Jianfeng Lu (Duke University), James Sethian (University of California, Berkeley)

    Ab initio or first principle electronic structure theories, particularly represented by Kohn-Sham density functional theory (KS-DFT), have been developed into workhorse tools with a wide range of scientific applications in chemistry, physics, materials science, biology etc. What is needed are new techniques that greatly extend the applicability and versatility of these approaches. At the core, many of the challenges that need to be addressed are essentially mathematical. The purpose of the workshop is to provide graduate students a self-contained introduction to electronic structure theory, with particular emphasis on frontier topics in aspects of applied analysis and numerical methods. 

    Updated on Mar 23, 2016 09:35 AM PDT
  3. Summer Graduate School Chip Firing and Tropical Curves

    Organizers: LEAD Matthew Baker (Georgia Institute of Technology), David Jensen (University of Kentucky), Sam Payne (Yale University)

    Tropical geometry uses a combination of techniques from algebraic geometry, combinatorics, and convex polyhedral geometry to study degenerations of algebraic varieties; the simplest tropical objects are tropical curves, which one can think of as "shadows" of algebraic curves.  Linear equivalence of divisors on an abstract tropical curve is determined by a simple but rich combinatorial process called "chip firing", which was discovered independently in the discrete setting by physicists and graph theorists.  From a pedagogical point of view, one can view tropical curves as a combinatorial model for the highly analogous but more abstract theory of algebraic curves, but there is in fact much more to the story than this: one can use tropical curves and chip firing to prove theorems in algebraic geometry and number theory.  This field is relatively new, so participants will have the opportunity to start from scratch and still get a glimpse of the cutting edge in this active research area.

    Updated on Feb 11, 2016 02:10 PM PST
  4. Program Complementary Program (2016-17)

    The Complementary Program has a limited number of memberships that are open to mathematicians whose interests are not closely related to the core programs; special consideration is given to mathematicians who are partners of an invited member of a core program. 

    Updated on Jun 07, 2016 12:46 PM PDT
  5. Program Geometric Group Theory

    Organizers: Ian Agol (University of California, Berkeley), Mladen Bestvina (University of Utah), Cornelia Drutu (University of Oxford), LEAD Mark Feighn (Rutgers University), Michah Sageev (Technion---Israel Institute of Technology), Karen Vogtmann (University of Warwick)

    The field of geometric group theory emerged from Gromov’s insight that even mathematical objects such as groups, which are defined completely in algebraic terms, can be profitably viewed as geometric objects and studied with geometric techniques Contemporary geometric group theory has broadened its scope considerably, but retains this basic philosophy of reformulating in geometric terms problems from diverse areas of mathematics and then solving them with a variety of tools. The growing list of areas where this general approach has been successful includes low-dimensional topology, the theory of manifolds, algebraic topology, complex dynamics, combinatorial group theory, algebra, logic, the study of various classical families of groups, Riemannian geometry and representation theory.


    The goals of this MSRI program are to bring together people from the various branches of the field in order to consolidate recent progress, chart new directions, and train the next generation of geometric group theorists.

    Updated on Jul 15, 2015 10:57 AM PDT
  6. Workshop Connections for Women: Geometric Group Theory

    Organizers: LEAD Ruth Charney (Brandeis University), Indira Chatterji (Université Nice Sophia-Antipolis), Mark Feighn (Rutgers University), Talia Fernós (University of North Carolina)

    This three-day workshop will feature talks by six prominent female mathematicians on a wide range of topics in geometric group theory.  Each speaker will give two lectures, separated by a break-out session during which participants will meet in small groups to discuss ideas presented in the first lecture.   The workshop is open to all mathematicians. 

    Updated on Apr 07, 2016 01:54 PM PDT
  7. Workshop Introductory Workshop: Geometric Group Theory

    Organizers: Martin Bridson (University of Oxford), Benson Farb (University of Chicago), LEAD Zlil Sela (Hebrew University), Karen Vogtmann (University of Warwick)

    This will be an introductory workshop to the MSRI jumbo program Geometric Group Theory being held during the Fall Semester of 2016. The purpose of the workshop is to provide an overview of key areas of research to be covered in the program, including an introduction to open problems of current interest.

    Updated on May 27, 2016 10:47 AM PDT
  8. Workshop Groups acting on CAT(0) spaces

    Organizers: Ian Agol (University of California, Berkeley), Pierre-Emmanuel Caprace (Université Catholique de Louvain), Koji Fujiwara (Kyoto University), Alessandra Iozzi (ETH Zürich-Hönggerberg), LEAD Michah Sageev (Technion---Israel Institute of Technology)

    The theme of the workshop is algebraic, geometric and analytical aspects of groups that act by isometries on spaces of non-positive curvature known as CAT(0) spaces. The world of CAT(0) spaces includes classical spaces such as symmetric spaces and buildings, as well as more avant-garde arrivals, such as CAT(0) cube complex. The workshop will bring together researchers studying various aspects of such groups and spaces to discuss recent developments and chart new directions in the field. 

    Updated on Apr 08, 2016 09:43 AM PDT
  9. Workshop Amenability, coarse embeddability and fixed point properties

    Organizers: Goulnara Arzhantseva (University of Vienna), LEAD Cornelia Drutu (University of Oxford), Graham Niblo (University of Southampton), Piotr Nowak (Polish Academy of Sciences)

    The main theme of the workshop is the spectrum of analytic properties running from Kazhdan's property (T) at one end to von Neumann's amenability at the other, that forms a foundational organizing structure for infinite groups and spaces. These properties can be described both analytically, via unitary representation theory, and geometrically, using embedding properties for discrete spaces. Connections with probability and combinatorics will likewise be addressed during the meeting.

    Updated on Jun 06, 2016 12:24 PM PDT
  10. Program Harmonic Analysis

    Organizers: LEAD Michael Christ (University of California, Berkeley), Allan Greenleaf (University of Rochester), Steven Hofmann (University of Missouri), LEAD Michael Lacey (Georgia Institute of Technology), Svitlana Mayboroda (University of Minnesota, Twin Cities), Betsy Stovall (University of Wisconsin-Madison), Brian Street (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

    The field of Harmonic Analysis dates back to the 19th century, and has its roots in the study of the decomposition of functions using Fourier series and the Fourier transform.  In recent decades, the subject has undergone a rapid diversification and expansion, though the decomposition of functions and operators into simpler parts remains a central tool and theme.  
     
    This program will bring together researchers representing the breadth of modern Harmonic Analysis and will seek to capitalize on and continue recent progress in four major directions:
         -Restriction, Kakeya, and Geometric Incidence Problems
         -Analysis on Nonhomogeneous Spaces
         -Weighted Norm Inequalities
         -Quantitative Rectifiability and Elliptic PDE.
    Many of these areas draw techniques from or have applications to other fields of mathematics, such as analytic number theory, partial differential equations, combinatorics, and geometric measure theory.  In particular, we expect a lively interaction with the concurrent program.  

    Updated on Oct 06, 2015 07:56 PM PDT
  11. Program Analytic Number Theory

    Organizers: Chantal David (Concordia University), Andrew Granville (Université de Montréal), Emmanuel Kowalski (ETH Zuerich), Philippe Michel (Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne), Kannan Soundararajan (Stanford University), LEAD Terence Tao (University of California, Los Angeles)

    Analytic number theory, and its applications and interactions, are currently experiencing intensive progress, in sometimes unexpected directions. In recent years, many important classical questions have seen spectacular advances based on new techniques; conversely, methods developed in analytic number theory have led to the solution of striking problems in other fields.

    This program will not only give the leading researchers in the area further opportunities to work together, but more importantly give young people the occasion to learn about these topics, and to give them the tools to achieve the next breakthroughs.

    Updated on Jul 10, 2015 03:54 PM PDT
  12. Workshop Connections for Women: Harmonic Analysis

    Organizers: Svitlana Mayboroda (University of Minnesota, Twin Cities), LEAD Betsy Stovall (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

    This workshop will highlight the work of several prominent women working in harmonic analysis, including some of the field's rising stars.  There will also be a panel discussion.  There will also be a contributed poster session.  This workshop is open to, and poster contributions are welcome from all mathematicians.

     

    Updated on Jun 20, 2016 12:55 PM PDT
  13. Workshop Introductory Workshop: Harmonic Analysis

    Organizers: Allan Greenleaf (University of Rochester), LEAD Michael Lacey (Georgia Institute of Technology), Svitlana Mayboroda (University of Minnesota, Twin Cities), Betsy Stovall (University of Wisconsin-Madison), Brian Street (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

    This week-long workshop will serve as an introduction for graduate students, postdocs, and other researchers to the main themes of the program.  It will feature accessible talks by a number of leading harmonic analysts, including several short courses on the core ideas and techniques in the field.  There will also be a problem session, to which all participants are encouraged to contribute. 

    Updated on Jun 17, 2016 09:51 AM PDT
  14. Workshop Connections for Women: Analytic Number Theory

    Organizers: LEAD Chantal David (Concordia University), Kaisa Matomäki (University of Turku), Lillian Pierce (Duke University), Kannan Soundararajan (Stanford University), Terence Tao (University of California, Los Angeles)

    This workshop will consist of lectures on the current state of research in analytic number theory, given by prominent women and men in the field.  The workshop is open to all graduate students, post-docs, and researchers in areas related to the program; it will also include a panel discussion session among female researchers on career issues, as well as other social events

    Updated on Apr 25, 2016 10:38 AM PDT
  15. Workshop Introductory Workshop: Analytic Number Theory

    Organizers: Andrew Granville (Université de Montréal), LEAD Emmanuel Kowalski (ETH Zuerich), Kaisa Matomäki (University of Turku), Philippe Michel (Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne)

    The introductory workshop will present, through short minicourses and introductory lectures, the main topics that will be the subject of much of the Analytic Number Theory Programme at MSRI. These topics include the theory of multiplicative functions, the theory of modular forms and L-functions, the circle method, sieve methods, and the theory of exponential sums over finite fields

    Updated on Nov 13, 2015 10:33 AM PST
  16. Workshop Recent developments in Analytic Number Theory

    Organizers: Tim Browning (University of Bristol), Chantal David (Concordia University), Kannan Soundararajan (Stanford University), LEAD Terence Tao (University of California, Los Angeles)

    This workshop will be focused on presenting the latest developments in analytic number theory, including (but not restricted to) recent advances in sieve theory, multiplicative number theory, exponential sums, arithmetic statistics, estimates on automorphic forms, and the Hardy-Littlewood circle method.

    Updated on May 19, 2016 11:17 AM PDT
  17. Workshop Recent Developments in Harmonic Analysis

    Organizers: Michael Christ (University of California, Berkeley), Steven Hofmann (University of Missouri), LEAD Michael Lacey (Georgia Institute of Technology), Betsy Stovall (University of Wisconsin-Madison), Brian Street (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

    Topics for this workshop will be drawn from the main research directions of this conference, including:
    (1) Restriction, Kakeya, and geometric incidence problems 
    (2) Analysis on nonhomogenous spaces
    (3) Weighted estimates
    (4) Quantitative rectifiability and other topics in PDE

    Updated on Jun 15, 2016 09:32 AM PDT
  18. Program Geometric and Topological Combinatorics

    Organizers: Jesus De Loera (University of California, Davis), Vic Reiner (University of Minnesota Twin Cities), LEAD Francisco Santos (University of Cantabria), Francis Su (Harvey Mudd College), Rekha Thomas (University of Washington), Günter M. Ziegler (Freie Universität Berlin)

    Combinatorics is one of the fastest growing areas in contemporary Mathematics, and much of this growth is due to the connections and interactions with other areas of Mathematics. This program is devoted to the very vibrant and active area of interaction between Combinatorics with Geometry and Topology. That is, we focus on (1) the study of the combinatorial properties or structure of geometric and topological objects and (2) the development of geometric and topological techniques to answer combinatorial problems.

    Key examples of geometric objects with intricate combinatorial structure are point configurations and matroids, hyperplane and subspace arrangements, polytopes and polyhedra, lattices, convex bodies, and sphere packings. Examples of topology in action answering combinatorial challenges are the by now classical Lovász’s solution of the Kneser conjecture, which yielded functorial approaches to graph coloring, and the  more recent, extensive topological machinery leading to breakthroughs on Tverberg-type problems.

    Updated on Sep 15, 2015 02:18 PM PDT
  19. Program Geometric Functional Analysis and Applications

    Organizers: Franck Barthe (Université de Toulouse III (Paul Sabatier)), Marianna Csornyei (University of Chicago), Boaz Klartag (Tel Aviv University), Alexander Koldobsky (University of Missouri), Rafal Latala (University of Warsaw), LEAD Mark Rudelson (University of Michigan)

    Geometric functional analysis lies at the interface of convex geometry, functional analysis and probability. It has numerous applications ranging from geometry of numbers and random matrices in pure mathematics to geometric tomography and signal processing in engineering and numerical optimization and learning theory in computer science.

    One of the directions of the program is classical convex geometry, with emphasis on connections with geometric tomography, the study of geometric properties of convex bodies based on information about their sections and projections. Methods of harmonic analysis play an important role here. A closely related direction is asymptotic geometric analysis studying geometric properties of high dimensional objects and normed spaces, especially asymptotics of their quantitative parameters as dimension tends to infinity. The main tools here are concentration of measure and related probabilistic results. Ideas developed in geometric functional analysis have led to progress in several areas of applied mathematics and computer science, including compressed sensing and random matrix methods. These applications as well as the problems coming from computer science will be also emphasised in our program.

    Updated on Jun 02, 2015 01:17 PM PDT
  20. Workshop Introductory Workshop: phenomena in high dimensions

    Organizers: Alexander Koldobsky (University of Missouri), Michel Ledoux (University of Toulouse), Monika Ludwig (Technische Universität Wien), LEAD Alain Pajor (Université de Paris Est Marne-la-Vallée), Stanislaw Szarek (Case Western Reserve University), Roman Vershynin (University of Michigan)

    This workshop will consist of several short courses related to high dimensional convex geometry, high dimensional probability, and applications in data science. The lectures will be accessible for graduate students.

    Updated on Oct 13, 2015 02:58 PM PDT
  21. Workshop Geometric and topological combinatorics: Modern techniques and methods

    Organizers: Patricia Hersh (North Carolina State University), LEAD Vic Reiner (University of Minnesota Twin Cities), Bernd Sturmfels (UC Berkeley Math Faculty), Frank Vallentin (Universität zu Köln), Günter M. Ziegler (Freie Universität Berlin)

    This workshop will focus on the interaction between Combinatorics, Geometry and Topology, including recent developments and techniques in areas such as 

    -- polytopes and cell complexes,
    -- simplicial complexes and higher order graph theory,
    -- methods from equivariant topology and configuration spaces,

    -- geometric combinatorics in optimization and social choice theory,
    -- algebraic and algebro-geometric methods.

    Updated on Sep 18, 2015 02:54 PM PDT
  22. Workshop Geometric functional analysis and applications

    Organizers: Franck Barthe (Université de Toulouse III (Paul Sabatier)), Rafal Latala (University of Warsaw), Emanuel Milman (Technion---Israel Institute of Technology), Assaf Naor (Princeton University), LEAD Gideon Schechtman (Weizmann Institute of Science)

    This is the main workshop of the program "Geometric functional analysis and applications". It will focus on the main topics of the program. These include: Convex geometry, Asymptotic geometric analysis, Interaction with computer science, Signal processing, Random matrix theory and other aspects of Probability.

    Created on Sep 10, 2015 11:41 AM PDT
  23. Workshop Women in Topology

    Organizers: Maria Basterra (University of New Hampshire), Kristine Bauer (University of Calgary), LEAD Kathryn Hess (École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL)), Brenda Johnson (Union College--Union University)

    The Women in Topology (WIT) network is an international group of female mathematicians interested in homotopy theory whose main goal is to increase the retention of women in the field by providing both unique collaborative research opportunities and mentorship between colleagues.  The MSRI WIT meeting will be organized as an afternoon of short talks from participants, followed by two days of open problem seminars and working groups designed to stimulate new collaborations, as well as to strengthen those already ongoing among the participants

    Updated on Feb 22, 2016 09:27 AM PST
  24. Program Enumerative Geometry Beyond Numbers

    Organizers: Mina Aganagic (University of California, Berkeley), Denis Auroux (University of California, Berkeley), Jim Bryan (University of British Columbia), LEAD Andrei Okounkov (Columbia University), Balazs Szendroi (University of Oxford)

    Traditional enumerative geometry asks certain questions to which the expected answer is a number: for instance, the number of lines incident with two points in the plane (1, Euclid), or the number of twisted cubic curves on a quintic threefold (317 206 375). It has however been recognized for some time that the numerics is often just the tip of the iceberg: a deeper exploration reveals interesting geometric, topological, representation-, or knot-theoretic structures. This semester-long program will be devoted to these hidden structures behind enumerative invariants, concentrating on the core fields where these questions start: algebraic and symplectic geometry.

    Updated on Oct 12, 2015 03:39 PM PDT
  25. Program Group Representation Theory and Applications

    Organizers: Robert Guralnick (University of Southern California), Alexander (Sasha) Kleshchev (University of Oregon), Gunter Malle (Universität Kaiserslautern), Gabriel Navarro (University of Valencia), Julia Pevtsova (University of Washington), Raphael Rouquier (University of California, Los Angeles), LEAD Pham Tiep (University of Arizona)

    Group Representation Theory is a central area of Algebra, with important and deep connections to areas as varied as topology, algebraic geometry, number theory, Lie theory, homological algebra, and mathematical physics. Born more than a century ago, the area still abounds with basic problems and fundamental conjectures, some of which have been open for over five decades. Very recent breakthroughs have led to the hope that some of these conjectures can finally be settled. In turn, recent results in group representation theory have helped achieve substantial progress in a vast number of applications.

    The goal of the program is to investigate all these deep problems and the wealth of new results and directions, to obtain major progress in the area, and to explore further applications of group representation theory to other branches of mathematics.

    Updated on Mar 16, 2016 01:25 PM PDT
  26. Workshop Representations of Finite and Algebraic Groups

    Organizers: Robert Guralnick (University of Southern California), Alexander (Sasha) Kleshchev (University of Oregon), Gunter Malle (Universität Kaiserslautern), Gabriel Navarro (University of Valencia), LEAD Pham Tiep (University of Arizona)

    The workshop will bring together key researchers working in various areas of Group Representation Theory to strengthen the interaction and collaboration between them and to make further progress on a number of
    basic problems and conjectures in the field. Topics of the workshop include
    -- Global-local conjectures in the representation theory of finite groups
    -- Representations and cohomology of simple, algebraic and finite groups
    -- Connections to Lie theory and categorification, and
    -- Applications to group theory, number theory, algebraic geometry, and combinatorics.

    Updated on Oct 02, 2015 04:31 PM PDT
  27. Program Hamiltonian systems, from topology to applications through analysis

    Organizers: Rafael de la Llave (Georgia Institute of Technology), LEAD Albert Fathi (École Normale Supérieure de Lyon), Vadim Kaloshin (University of Maryland), Robert Littlejohn (University of California, Berkeley), Philip Morrison (University of Texas at Austin), Tere M. Seara (Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya), Serge Tabachnikov (Pennsylvania State University), Amie Wilkinson (University of Chicago)

    Updated on Jun 07, 2016 03:58 PM PDT
  28. Program Derived Algebraic Geometry

    Organizers: Julie Bergner (University of California, Riverside), LEAD Bhargav Bhatt (University of Michigan), Dennis Gaitsgory (Harvard University), David Nadler (University of California, Berkeley), Nikita Rozenblyum (University of Chicago), Peter Scholze (Universität Bonn), Bertrand Toen (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS)), Gabriele Vezzosi (Università di Firenze)

    Derived algebraic geometry is an extension of algebraic geometry that provides a convenient framework for directly treating non-generic geometric situations (such as non-transverse intersections in intersection theory), in lieu of the more traditional perturbative approaches (such as the “moving” lemma). This direct approach, in addition to being conceptually satisfying, has the distinct advantage of preserving the symmetries of the situation, which makes it much more applicable. In particular, in recent years, such techniques have found applications in diverse areas of mathematics, ranging from arithmetic geometry, mathematical physics, geometric representation theory, and homotopy theory. This semester long program will be dedicated to exploring these directions further, and finding new connections.

    Updated on Mar 01, 2016 11:02 AM PST
  29. Program Birational Geometry and Moduli Spaces

    Organizers: Antonella Grassi (University of Pennsylvania), LEAD Christopher Hacon (University of Utah), Sándor Kovács (University of Washington), Mircea Mustaţă (University of Michigan), Martin Olsson (University of California, Berkeley)

    Birational Geometry and Moduli Spaces are two important areas of Algebraic Geometry that have recently witnessed a flurry of activity and substantial progress on many fundamental open questions. In this program we aim to  bring together key researchers in these and related areas to highlight the recent exciting progress and to explore future avenues of research.
     
    This program will focus on the following themes: Geometry and Derived Categories, Birational Algebraic Geometry, Moduli Spaces of Stable Varieties, Geometry in Characteristic p>0, and Applications of Algebraic Geometry: Elliptic Fibrations of Calabi-Yau Varieties in Geometry, Arithmetic and the Physics of String Theory

    Updated on Feb 29, 2016 02:50 PM PST