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All upcoming workshops

  1. Breaking the Neural Code

    Organizers: Larry Abbott (Columbia University), Ingrid Daubechies (Duke University), Michael Jordan (University of California), LEAD Liam Paninski (Columbia University)

    For decades, neuroscientists have dreamed about the possibility of recording from all the neurons in a brain, or of having access to a complete large brain wiring diagram, or ideally to obtain both of these datasets simultaneously, in the same brain.  Recent technical advances have brought this dream close to reality in some cases.  Now the challenge will be to understand these massive datasets.  A few domains will be particularly relevant:

    • Inferring network structure from noisy and incomplete data
    • Inferring computational input-output function from structure
    • Optimal experimental design (incl. compressive sensing methods) for observation of networks
    • Modeling structured stochastic network dynamics
    • Optimal control of network dynamics
    • Inferring low-dimensional dynamics from high-dimensional observations

    There’s a strong need in neuroscience for deep new ideas from mathematics and statistics, and our hope is that this small, focused workshop without many formal talks will spark collaborations that will lead to breakthroughs in the areas described above.

    This workshop is by invitation only.

    Updated on Jul 15, 2014 02:06 PM PDT
  2. Bay Area Differential Geometry Seminar (BADGS) Fall 2014

    Organizers: David Bao (San Francisco State University), Joel Hass (University of California, Davis), LEAD David Hoffman (Stanford University), Rafe Mazzeo (Stanford University), Richard Montgomery (University of California, Santa Cruz)

    The Bay Area Differential Geometry Seminar meets 3 times each year and is a 1-day seminar on recent developments in differential geometry and geometric analysis, broadly interpreted. Typically, it runs from mid-morning until late afternoon, with 3-4 speakers. Lunch will be available and the final talk will be followed by dinner.

    Location: Mathematical Sciences Research Institute, Berkeley CA

    Updated on Sep 24, 2014 01:43 PM PDT
  3. Categorical Structures in Harmonic Analysis

    Organizers: Thomas Haines (University of Maryland), Florian Herzig (University of Toronto), LEAD David Nadler (University of California, Berkeley)

    The workshop will focus on the role of categorical structures in number theory and harmonic analysis, with an emphasis on the setting of the Langlands program. Celebrated examples of this theme range from Lusztig's character sheaves to Ngo's proof of the Fundamental Lemma. The workshop will be a forum for researchers from a diverse collection of fields to compare problems and strategies for solutions.

    Updated on Oct 24, 2014 08:50 AM PDT
  4. Automorphic forms, Shimura varieties, Galois representations and L-functions

    Organizers: LEAD Pierre Colmez (L'Institut de Mathématiques de Jussieu), Stephen Kudla (University of Toronto), Elena Mantovan (California Institute of Technology), Ariane Mézard (L'Institut de Mathématiques de Jussieu), Richard Taylor (Institute for Advanced Study)

    L-functions attached to Galois representations coming from algebraic geometry contain subtle arithmetic information (conjectures of Birch and Swinnerton-Dyer, Deligne, Beilinson, Bloch and Kato, Fontaine and Perrin-Riou). Langlands has predicted the existence of a correspondence relating these L-functions to L-functions of automorphic forms which are much better understood. The workshop will focus on recent developments related to Langlands correspondence (construction of Galois representations attached to automorphic forms via the cohomology of Shimura varieties, modularity of Galois representations...) and arithmetic of special values of L-functions.

    It will be dedicated to Michael Harris as a tribute to his enormous influence on the themes of the workshop.

    Updated on Oct 22, 2014 01:33 PM PDT
  5. Connections for Women: Dynamics on Moduli Spaces of Geometric Structures

    Organizers: Virginie Charette (University of Sherbrooke), LEAD Fanny Kassel (Université de Lille I (Sciences et Techniques de Lille Flandres Artois)), Karin Melnick (University of Maryland), Anna Wienhard (Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg)

    This two-day workshop will consist of various talks given by prominent female mathematicians in the field.  These will be appropriate for graduate students, post-docs, and researchers in areas related to the program.  The workshop will also include a professional development session.

    This workshop is open to all mathematicians.

    Updated on Oct 20, 2014 12:07 PM PDT
  6. Introductory Workshop: Dynamics on Moduli Spaces of Geometric Structures

    Organizers: Richard Canary (University of Michigan), LEAD William Goldman (University of Maryland), Ursula Hamenstädt (Universität Bonn), Alessandra Iozzi (ETH Zurich)

    The deformation theory of geometric structures on manifolds  is a subfield of differential geometry and topology, with a heavy infusion of Lie theory. Its richness stems from close relations to dynamical systems, algebraic geometry, representation theory, Lie theory, partial differential equations, number theory, and complex analysis.

    The introductory workshop will serve  as an overview to the  program.   It aims to familiarize graduate students, post-docs, and other researchers to the major topics of the program. There will be a number of short courses.

    Updated on Oct 15, 2014 05:45 PM PDT
  7. Connections for Women: Geometric and Arithmetic Aspects of Homogeneous Dynamics

    Organizers: Elon Lindenstrauss (Hebrew University), Hee Oh (Yale University)

    This workshop will consist of several mini-courses given by prominent female mathematicians in the field, intended for graduate students, post-docs, and researchers in areas related to the program. The workshop will also include an informal panel discussion session among female researchers on career issues. This workshop is open to all mathematicians.

    Updated on Oct 20, 2014 12:05 PM PDT
  8. Introductory Workshop: Geometric and Arithmetic Aspects of Homogeneous Dynamics

    Organizers: Manfred Einsiedler (Eidgenössische TH Zürich-Hönggerberg), LEAD Jean-François Quint (University de Bordeaux 1), Barbara Schapira (Université de Picardie (Jules Verne))

    This Introductory Workshop will consist of several introductory lectures and series of lectures on the recent trends in the field, given by experts in the domain. In addition, there will be several shorter talks by young researchers.

    Updated on Oct 13, 2014 11:40 AM PDT
  9. Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2015: Developmental Mathematics: For whom? Toward what ends?

    Organizers: Duane Cooper (Morehouse College), Mark Hoover (University of Michigan), LEAD Robert Megginson (University of Michigan), Richard Sgarlotti (Hannahville Indian School), Katherine Stevenson (California State University, Northridge)

    This workshop will address the critical issue of developmental mathematics at two- and four-year colleges and universities and the broader dynamic of mathematics remediation that occurs at all levels. It will engage mathematicians, K-12 teachers, mathematics educators, and administrators in a conversation about the goals of developmental mathematics and the contributions that our different professional communities make to this work. Key questions that will be addressed are:

    1. How do we teach content in ways that acknowledge and leverage each student's prior learning experiences? In particular, how do we take advantage of a student's maturity while refining his or her learning habits where necessary?

    2. How can developmental mathematics instruction move students through mathematics which must be relearned while simultaneously gaining momentum on more advanced mathematics (including the development of mathematical practices needed for meaningful mathematical work)?

    3. What are strategies for supporting the needs of the wide range of students in developmental mathematics programs--those developing mathematical skills for life in general as well as those developing the foundation necessary to proceed towards a STEM major?  How can we successfully address equity issues raised for students from groups underrepresented in STEM fields? How can developmental mathematics instruction blend synchronous and asynchronous instruction to achieve maximal efficiency and impact?

    4. What is the proper balance between addressing the needs of the wide range of students mentioned in the preceding point and keeping instruction and course offerings concise?

    5. What are the characteristics, training, and practices of a successful developmental mathematics teacher?

    6. What support services enhance the success of a developmental mathematics program?

    Updated on Aug 04, 2014 12:58 PM PDT
  10. Dynamics on Moduli Spaces

    Organizers: Markus Burger (ETH Zurich), David Dumas (University of Illinois at Chicago), Olivier Guichard (Université de Strasbourg I (Louis Pasteur)), François Labourie (Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis), Anna Wienhard (Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg)

    The Research Workshop of the ``Dynamics on moduli spaces of geometric structures'' will concentrate on some of the following general interrelated themes:

    (1) Geometric structures on the spaces of geometric structures which extend and generalize classical constructions on Teichmüller spaces, such as the Weil-Petersoon metric, the pressure metric, the Teichmüller metric and its geodesic flow, Fenchel-Nielsen coordinates, Fock-Goncharov Thurson-Penner coordinates, and the symplectic and Poisson  geometries

    (2) Relations with harmonic maps, Riemann surfaces, complex geometry:  specifically Higgs  bundles, holomorphic differentials (quadratic, cubic, etc.) as parameters  for representations  of the fundamental group, hyperkähler and complex symplectic geometry of  moduli spaces,   lifts of Teichmüller geodesic flows to flat bundles of character varieties

    (3) Asymptotic properties of higher Teichmüller spaces, including generalized measured geodesic laminations, Culler-Morgan-Shalen asymptotics of character varieties, degenerations of geometric structures and discrete subgroups

    (4) Actions of mapping class groups and outer automorphism groups,  properness criteria for Anosov representations and their generalizations,  properness criteria for non-discrete representations, chaotic actions of  mapping class groups and the monodromy map from structures to  representations

    (5) Classification of exotic geometric structures, tameness criteria, generalizations of ending lamination-type invariants to higher rank structures, rigidity and flexibility for thin subgroups, arithmeticity conditions, and geometric transitions

    Updated on Jan 21, 2014 08:15 PM PST
  11. Advances in Homogeneous Dynamics

    Organizers: LEAD Dmitry Kleinbock (Brandeis University), Hee Oh (Yale University), Alireza Salehi Golsefidy (University of California, San Diego), Ralf Spatzier (University of Michigan)

    The Advances in Homogeneous Dynamics workshop will feature the speakers whose work is at the forefront of the field. There will be a panel discussion accompanied by an open problem session to lay out possible directions for the research in homogeneous dynamics. Talks will be in a broad range of topics and this will help to build more connections between researchers interested in dynamical systems, number theory and geometry. For example we hope that the involvement of the participants of the other program held at MSRI during the same academic year (Dynamics on Moduli Spaces of Geometric Structures, Spring 2015) would create new connections between the topics. There will be shorter talks presented by early-career researchers

    Updated on Oct 20, 2014 01:13 PM PDT
  12. Connections for Women: Differential Geometry

    Organizers: Christine Breiner (Fordham University), LEAD Natasa Sesum (Rutgers University)

    The purpose of this meeting is to help junior female researchers to become familiar with the focus topics of the main MSRI program, and also for the junior researchers to have an opportunity to get acquainted with more senior women researchers in differential geometry.

    Updated on Mar 10, 2014 08:35 AM PDT
  13. Introductory Workshop: Modern Riemannian Geometry

    Organizers: LEAD Tobias Colding (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), John Lott (University of California, Berkeley), Jeff Viaclovsky (University of Wisconsin)

    The week will be devoted to an introduction to modern techniques in Riemannian geometry. This is intended to help graduate students and younger researchers get a headstart, in order to increase their participation during the main semester programs and research lectures. To increase outreach, the week will focus on Riemannian geometry and should be largely accessible. Some minicourses on topics of recent interest will be included. The workshop will also have semi-expository lectures dealing with aspects of spaces with curvature bounded from below, since such spaces will occur throughout the semester. We expect that many Berkeley mathematicians and students will participate in the introductory workshop.

    Updated on Aug 14, 2014 08:49 AM PDT
  14. Kähler Geometry, Einstein Metrics, and Generalizations

    Organizers: Simon Donaldson (Imperial College, London), Gang Tian (Princeton University), Jeff Viaclovsky (University of Wisconsin)

    The workshop will integrate elements from complex differential geometry with Einstein metrics and their generalizations. The topics will include

    - Existence of Kähler-Einstein metrics and extremal Kähler metrics. Notions of stability in algebraic geometry such as Chow stability, K-stability, b-stability, and polytope stability. Kähler-Einstein metrics with conical singularities along a divisor.

    - Calabi-Yau metrics and collapsed limit spaces. Connections with physics and mirror symmetry.

    - Einstein metrics and their moduli spaces, ε-regularity, noncompact examples such as ALE, ALF, and Poincaré-Einstein metrics. Generalizations of the Einstein condition, such as Bach-flat metrics and Ricci solitons.

    - Sasaki-Einstein metrics and metrics with special holonomy. New examples and classification problems.

    Updated on Aug 03, 2013 09:30 AM PDT
  15. Geometric Flows in Riemannian and Complex Geometry

    Organizers: Tobias Colding (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), LEAD John Lott (University of California, Berkeley), Natasa Sesum (Rutgers University)

    The workshop will concentrate on parabolic methods in both Riemannian and complex geometry. The topics will include

    - Ricci flow. Analytic questions about Ricci flow in three dimensions. Possible applications of Ricci flow to 4-manifold topology. Ricci flow in higher dimensions under curvature assumptions.

    - Kähler-Ricci Flow. Applications to the Kähler-Einstein problem. Connections to the minimal model program. Study of Kähler-Ricci solitons and limits of Kähler-Ricci flow.

    - Mean curvature flow. Singularity analysis. Generic mean curvature flow.

    - Other geometric flows such as Calabi flow and pluriclosed flow.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 10:39 AM PDT