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Upcoming Other Workshops

  1. Women in Topology

    Organizers: Maria Basterra (University of New Hampshire), Kristine Bauer (University of Calgary), LEAD Kathryn Hess (École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL)), Brenda Johnson (Union College--Union University)

    The Women in Topology (WIT) network is an international group of female mathematicians interested in homotopy theory whose main goal is to increase the retention of women in the field by providing both unique collaborative research opportunities and mentorship between colleagues.  The MSRI WIT meeting will be organized as an afternoon of short talks from participants, followed by two days of open problem seminars and working groups designed to stimulate new collaborations, as well as to strengthen those already ongoing among the participants.

     

    Updated on Oct 23, 2017 11:58 AM PDT
  2. Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2018: Access to mathematics by opening doors for students currently excluded from mathematics

    Organizers: Aditya Adiredja (University of Arizona), LEAD Julia Aguirre (University of Washington - Tacoma), Kate Belin (Fannie Lou Hamer Freedom High School), LEAD Ricardo Cortez (Tulane University), Michael Driskill (Math for America ), Nicole Joseph (Vanderbilt University), Katherine Stevenson (California State University, Northridge), Francis Su (Harvey Mudd College), Maria del Rosario Zavala (San Francisco State University)

    Our mathematics education system is inequitable. It operates in ways that leave a significant proportion of students with negative mathematics experiences and inadequate mathematical preparation. The problem is historical and systemic, and the students most disaffected by the current system are overwhelmingly Black and Latino, Indigenous, poor, women, immigrant or first generation college students. If our mathematics community is to sustainably grow and thrive, mathematics education at all levels must be transformed.

    This workshop focuses on students for whom we do not yet successfully ensure access to and advancement in mathematics. Sessions will share relevant programmatic efforts and innovative research that have been shown to maintain or increase students’ engagement and interests in mathematics across k-12, undergraduate and graduate education. The sessions will focus particularly on reproducible efforts that affirm those students’ identities and their diverse intellectual resources and lived experiences. These efforts at various levels of mathematics education will highlight ways in which meaningful experiences in mathematics can disrupt ongoing systemic oppression. Participants will leave with conceptual and practical ways to open up and elevate mathematics education where all students thrive.

    Updated on Sep 29, 2017 09:35 AM PDT
  3. The 2018 Infinite Possibilities Conference

    Organizers: Alejandra Alvarado (Eastern Illinois University), Hélène Barcelo (MSRI - Mathematical Sciences Research Institute), Rebecca Garcia (Sam Houston State University), LEAD Lily Khadjavi (Loyola Marymount University), Candice Price (University of San Diego), Kimberly Sellers (Georgetown University), Kimberly Weems (North Carolina Central University), Ulrica Wilson (Morehouse College; Institute for Computational and Experimental Research in Mathematics (ICERM))
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    The Infinite Possibilities Conference (IPC) is a national conference that is designed to promote, educate, encourage and support underrepresented women interested in mathematics and statistics. While a number of workshops and conferences in the mathematical sciences work to increase awareness of issues of underrepresentation with respect to race/ethnicity or to gender, there is a lack of programming designed to address both. Through a lively series of panels, plenary sessions, research presentations, and workshops, IPC addresses issues including:  the sharing of professional advice and mentoring; the sharing of research in a supportive environment; the need to counteract isolation; and the need for visible role models. 

    Updated on Nov 17, 2017 04:18 PM PST