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Upcoming Summer Graduate Schools

  1. Geometric Group Theory

    Organizers: LEAD John Mackay (University of Bristol), Anne Thomas (University of Glasgow), Kevin Wortman (University of Utah)

    The aim of this workshop is to introduce graduate students to some specific core topics which will be under study at the upcoming MSRI program on Geometric Group Theory (GGT) in 2016.  GGT encompasses a wide range of topics. The four minicourse topics have been chosen because they are central themes in GGT and in the upcoming MSRI program. Moreover, each topic is accessible to students with a range of backgrounds: the basic definitions are straightforward, with many simple and illuminating examples to work through, yet lead through to important questions in current research.

    Updated on Aug 28, 2014 01:51 PM PDT
  2. Mathematical Topics in Systems Biology

    Organizers: LEAD Steven Altschuler (University of California, San Francisco), Lani Wu (University of California, San Francisco)

    This Summer Graduate School will introduce mathematics graduate students to the rapidly emerging area of systems biology. In particular, we will focus on the design and emergent behaviors of molecular networks used by cells to interpret their environments and create robust temporal-spatial behaviors. This will be a very hands-on workshop with students working alone and in teams to program and present key ideas.

    Updated on Aug 28, 2014 12:08 PM PDT
  3. Gaps between Primes and Analytic Number Theory

    Organizers: Andrew Granville (University of Montreal), LEAD Emmanuel Kowalski (Eidgenössische TH Zürich-Hönggerberg)

    These courses will give students a full overview of the results of Zhang and Maynard on gaps between primes, and will provide them will a clear understanding of the tools involved. This will make accessible a significant part of modern analytic number theory. The lecturers will also make sure to include, within their course, examples and discussions going further than is strictly required to understand the proofs of Zhang and Maynard, e.g., in the direction of automorphic forms and the Riemann Hypothesis over finite fields.

    Updated on Aug 26, 2014 04:39 PM PDT
  4. Incompressible Fluid Flows at High Reynolds Number

    Organizers: Jacob Bedrossian (University of Maryland), LEAD Vlad Vicol (Princeton University)

    The purpose of this two week workshop is to introduce graduate students to state-of-the-art methods and results in mathematical fluid dynamics. In the first week, we will discuss the mathematical foundations and modern analysis aspects of the Navier-Stokes and Euler equations. In the second week, we will run two courses concurrently on the topics of inviscid limits and hydrodynamic stability. Specifically, one course will focus on boundary layers in high Reynolds number flows and the Prandtl equations while the other will focus on mixing and connections to turbulence. Through the lectures and associated problem sessions, the students will learn about a number of new analysis tools and principles of fluid mechanics that are not always taught in a graduate school curriculum.

    Updated on Aug 28, 2014 08:47 AM PDT