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Upcoming Educational Events

  1. Summer Graduate School Seminaire de Mathematiques Superieures 2016: Dynamics of Biological Systems

    Organizers: Thomas Hillen (University of Alberta), Mark Lewis (University of Alberta), Yingfei Yi (University of Alberta)

    The purpose of this summer school is to focus on the interplay of dynamical and biological systems, developing the rich connectionbetween science and mathematics that has been so successful to date. Our focus will be on understanding the mathematical structure of dynamical systems that come from biological problems, and then relating the mathematical structures back to the biology to provide scientific insight. We will focus on five key areas: complex bio-networks, multi scale biological dynamics, biological waves, nonlinear dynamics of pattern formation, and disease dynamics. For each of the five key areas, we will invite 2-3 world leaders who are also excellent communicators to deliver a series of 2-4 one-hour lectures. We expect an average of eight hours of lecture per subject area, spread over approximately two weeks.

    Updated on Nov 11, 2015 03:54 PM PST
  2. MSRI-UP MSRI-UP 2016: Sandpile Groups

    Organizers: Federico Ardila (San Francisco State University), Duane Cooper (Morehouse College), Maria Mercedes Franco (Queensborough Community College (CUNY)), Herbert Medina (Loyola Marymount University), LEAD Suzanne Weekes (Worcester Polytechnic Institute)

    The MSRI-UP summer program is designed for undergraduate students who have completed two years of university-level mathematics courses and would like to conduct research in the mathematical sciences. Due to funding restrictions, only U.S. citizens and permanent residents are eligible to apply and the program cannot accept foreign students regardless of funding. The academic portion of the 2016 program will be led by Prof. Luis Garcia-Puente of Sam Houston State University.

    Updated on Nov 30, 2015 12:55 PM PST
  3. Summer Graduate School Harmonic Analysis and Elliptic Equations on real Euclidean Spaces and on Rough Sets

    Organizers: LEAD Steven Hofmann (University of Missouri), Jose Maria Martell (Instituto de Ciencias Matematicas)

    The goal of the workshop is to present harmonic analysis techniques in $R^n$ (the ``flat" setting), and then to show how those techniques extend to much rougher settings, with application to the theory of elliptic equations. Thus, the subject matter of the workshop will introduce the students to an active, current research area:  the interface between harmonic analysis, elliptic PDE, and geometric measure theory.

    Updated on Oct 19, 2015 12:33 PM PDT
  4. Summer Graduate School Mixed Integer Nonlinear Programming: Theory, algorithms and applications

    Organizers: Franscisco Castro (Universidad de Sevilla), Elena Fernandez (Universitat Polit├Ęcnica de Catalunya), Justo Puerto (Universidad de Sevilla)

    This school is oriented to the presentation of theory, algorithms and applications for the solution of mixed integer nonlinear problems (MINLP). This type of problems appears in numerous application areas where the modelization of nonlinear phenomena with logical constraints is important; we must remember here the memorable phrase “the world is nonlinear”. Nowadays the theoretical aspects of this area are spread in a number of recent papers which makes it difficult, for non-specialist, to have a solid background of the existing results and new advances in the field. This school aims to organize and present this material in an organized way. Moreover, it also pursues to link theory with actual applications. In particular, remarkable applications can be found in air traffic control agencies, the air companies, the electric power generation companies, the chemical complex units, the analysis of financial products usually associated with risk dealing and in the algorithms in the statistical field and artificial intelligence as for instance artificial neural networks, or supporting vector machines, among many others.

    Updated on Oct 19, 2015 12:34 PM PDT
  5. Summer Graduate School An Introduction to Character Theory and the McKay Conjecture

    Organizers: Robert Guralnick (University of Southern California), Pham Tiep (University of Arizona)

    Character Theory of Finite Groups provides one of the most powerful tools to study groups. In this course we will give a gentle introduction to basic results in the Character Theory, as well as some of the main conjectures in Group Representation Theory, with particular emphasis on the McKay Conjecture.

    Updated on Mar 22, 2016 01:07 PM PDT
  6. Summer Graduate School Electronic Structure Theory

    Organizers: LEAD Lin Lin (University of California, Berkeley), Jianfeng Lu (Duke University), James Sethian (University of California, Berkeley)

    Ab initio or first principle electronic structure theories, particularly represented by Kohn-Sham density functional theory (KS-DFT), have been developed into workhorse tools with a wide range of scientific applications in chemistry, physics, materials science, biology etc. What is needed are new techniques that greatly extend the applicability and versatility of these approaches. At the core, many of the challenges that need to be addressed are essentially mathematical. The purpose of the workshop is to provide graduate students a self-contained introduction to electronic structure theory, with particular emphasis on frontier topics in aspects of applied analysis and numerical methods. 

    Updated on Mar 23, 2016 09:35 AM PDT
  7. Summer Graduate School Chip Firing and Tropical Curves

    Organizers: LEAD Matthew Baker (Georgia Institute of Technology), David Jensen (University of Kentucky), Sam Payne (Yale University)

    Tropical geometry uses a combination of techniques from algebraic geometry, combinatorics, and convex polyhedral geometry to study degenerations of algebraic varieties; the simplest tropical objects are tropical curves, which one can think of as "shadows" of algebraic curves.  Linear equivalence of divisors on an abstract tropical curve is determined by a simple but rich combinatorial process called "chip firing", which was discovered independently in the discrete setting by physicists and graph theorists.  From a pedagogical point of view, one can view tropical curves as a combinatorial model for the highly analogous but more abstract theory of algebraic curves, but there is in fact much more to the story than this: one can use tropical curves and chip firing to prove theorems in algebraic geometry and number theory.  This field is relatively new, so participants will have the opportunity to start from scratch and still get a glimpse of the cutting edge in this active research area.

    Updated on Feb 11, 2016 02:10 PM PST