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Upcoming Educational Events

  1. Workshop Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2018: Access to mathematics by opening doors for students currently excluded from mathematics

    Organizers: Aditya Adiredja (University of Arizona), LEAD Julia Aguirre (University of Washington - Tacoma), Kate Belin (Fannie Lou Hamer Freedom High School), LEAD Ricardo Cortez (Tulane University), Michael Driskill (Math for America ), Nicole Joseph (Vanderbilt University), Katherine Stevenson (California State University, Northridge), Francis Su (Harvey Mudd College), Maria del Rosario Zavala (San Francisco State University)

    Our mathematics education system is inequitable. It operates in ways that leave a significant proportion of students with negative mathematics experiences and inadequate mathematical preparation. The problem is historical and systemic, and the students most disaffected by the current system are overwhelmingly Black and Latino, Indigenous, poor, women, immigrant or first generation college students. If our mathematics community is to sustainably grow and thrive, mathematics education at all levels must be transformed.

    This workshop focuses on students for whom we do not yet successfully ensure access to and advancement in mathematics. Sessions will share relevant programmatic efforts and innovative research that have been shown to maintain or increase students’ engagement and interests in mathematics across k-12, undergraduate and graduate education. The sessions will focus particularly on reproducible efforts that affirm those students’ identities and their diverse intellectual resources and lived experiences. These efforts at various levels of mathematics education will highlight ways in which meaningful experiences in mathematics can disrupt ongoing systemic oppression. Participants will leave with conceptual and practical ways to open up and elevate mathematics education where all students thrive.

    Updated on Sep 29, 2017 09:35 AM PDT
  2. Workshop Latinx in the Mathematical Sciences Conference 2018

    Organizers: Federico Ardila (San Francisco State University), Ricardo Cortez (Tulane University), Tatiana Toro (University of Washington), Mariel Vazquez (University of California, Davis)

    On March 8-10, 2018, IPAM will host a conference showcasing the achievements of Latinx in the mathematical sciences. The goal of the conference is to encourage Latinx to pursue careers in the mathematical sciences, to promote the advancement of Latinx currently in the discipline, to showcase research being conducted by Latinx at the forefront of their fields, and, finally, to build a community around shared academic interests. The conference will be held on the UCLA campus in Los Angeles, CA. It will begin at noon on Thursday, March 8.

    This conference is sponsored by the Mathematical Sciences Institutes Diversity Initiative, with funding from the National Science Foundation Division of Mathematical Sciences.

    Updated on Oct 23, 2017 04:53 PM PDT
  3. Workshop The 2018 Infinite Possibilities Conference

    Organizers: Alejandra Alvarado (Eastern Illinois University), Hélène Barcelo (MSRI - Mathematical Sciences Research Institute), Rebecca Garcia (Sam Houston State University), LEAD Lily Khadjavi (Loyola Marymount University), Candice Price (University of San Diego), Kimberly Sellers (Georgetown University), Kimberly Weems (North Carolina Central University), Ulrica Wilson (Morehouse College; Institute for Computational and Experimental Research in Mathematics (ICERM))
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    The Infinite Possibilities Conference (IPC) is a national conference that is designed to promote, educate, encourage and support underrepresented women interested in mathematics and statistics. While a number of workshops and conferences in the mathematical sciences work to increase awareness of issues of underrepresentation with respect to race/ethnicity or to gender, there is a lack of programming designed to address both. Through a lively series of panels, plenary sessions, research presentations, and workshops, IPC addresses issues including:  the sharing of professional advice and mentoring; the sharing of research in a supportive environment; the need to counteract isolation; and the need for visible role models. 

    Updated on Nov 17, 2017 04:18 PM PST
  4. Summer Graduate School Séminaire de Mathématiques Supérieures 2018: Derived Geometry and Higher Categorical Structures in Geometry and Physics

    Organizers: Anton Alekseev (Université de Genève), Ruxandra Moraru (University of Waterloo), Chenchang Zhu (Universität Göttingen)

    Higher categorical structures and homotopy methods have made significant influence on geometry in recent years. This summer school is aimed at transferring these ideas and fundamental technical tools to the next generation of mathematicians.

    The summer school will focus on the following four topics:  higher categorical structures in geometry, derived geometry, factorization algebras, and their application in physics.  There will be eight to ten mini courses on these topics, including mini courses led by Chirs Brav, Kevin Costello, Jacob Lurie, and Ezra Getzler. The prerequisites will be kept at a minimum, however, a introductory courses in differential geometry, algebraic topology and abstract algebra are recommended.

    Updated on Oct 11, 2017 10:49 AM PDT
  5. Summer Graduate School The ∂-Problem in the Twenty-First Century

    Organizers: Debraj Chakrabarti (Central Michigan University), Jeffery McNeal (Ohio State University)

    This Summer Graduate School will introduce students to the modern theory of the  inhomogeneous Cauchy-Riemann equation, the fundamental partial differential equation of Complex Analysis. This theory uses powerful tools of partial differential equations, differential geometry and functional analysis to obtain a refined understanding of holomorphic functions on complex manifolds. Besides students planning to work in complex analysis, this course will be valuable to those planning to study partial differential equations, complex differential and algebraic geometry, and operator theory. The exposition will be self-contained and the prerequisites will be kept at a minimum

    Updated on Jul 20, 2017 11:48 AM PDT
  6. MSRI-UP MSRI-UP 2018: The Mathematics of Data Science

    Organizers: Federico Ardila (San Francisco State University), Duane Cooper (Morehouse College), LEAD Maria Mercedes Franco (Queensborough Community College (CUNY)), Rebecca Garcia (Sam Houston State University), David Uminsky (University of San Francisco), Suzanne Weekes (Worcester Polytechnic Institute)

    The MSRI-UP summer program is designed to serve a diverse group of undergraduate students who would like to conduct research in the mathematical sciences.

    In 2018, MSRI-UP will focus on the core role of (linear) algebra in current research and application areas of Data Science ranging from unsupervised learning, clustering and networks, to algebraic signal processing and feature extraction, to the central role linear algebra plays in deep machine learning.  The research program will be led by Dr. David Uminsky, Associate Professor of Mathematics and Statistics at the University of San Francisco.

    Updated on Nov 01, 2017 02:09 PM PDT
  7. Summer Graduate School Mathematical Analysis of Behavior

    Organizers: Ann Hermundstad (Janelia Research Campus, HHMI), Vivek Jayaraman (Janelia Research Campus, HHMI), Eva Kanso (University of Southern California), L. Mahadevan (Harvard University)

    Explore Outstanding Phenomena in Animal Behavior

    Jointly hosted by Janelia and the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute (MSRI), this program will bring together 15-20 advanced PhD students with complementary expertise who are interested in working at the interface of mathematics and biology. Emphasis will be placed on linking behavior to neural dynamics and exploring the coupling between these processes and the natural sensory environment of the organism. The aim is to educate a new type of global scientist that will work collaboratively in tackling complex problems in cellular, circuit and behavioral biology by combining experimental and computational techniques with rigorous mathematics and physics.

    Updated on Sep 29, 2017 09:49 AM PDT
  8. Summer Graduate School Derived Categories

    Organizers: Nicolas Addington (University of Oregon), LEAD Alexander Polishchuk (University of Oregon)

    The goal of the school is to give an introduction to basic techniques for working with derived categories, with an emphasis on the derived categories of coherent sheaves on algebraic varieties. A particular goal will be to understand Orlov’s equivalence relating the derived category of a projective hypersurface with matrix factorizations of the corresponding polynomial.

    Updated on Jul 20, 2017 12:29 PM PDT
  9. Summer Graduate School H-principle

    Organizers: Emmy Murphy (Northwestern University), Takashi Tsuboi (University of Tokyo)
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    The image of a large sphere isometrically embedded into a small space through a C^1 embedding. (Attributions: E. Bartzos, V. Borrelli, R. Denis, F. Lazarus, D. Rohmer, B. Thibert)

    This two week summer school will introduce graduate students to the theory of h-principles.  After building up the theory from basic smooth topology, we will focus on more recent developments of the theory, particularly applications to symplectic and contact geometry, and foliation theory.

    Updated on Nov 02, 2017 10:19 AM PDT
  10. Summer Graduate School IAS/PCMI 2018: Harmonic Analysis

    Organizers: Carlos Kenig (University of Chicago), Fanghua Lin (New York University, Courant Institute), Svitlana Mayboroda (University of Minnesota, Twin Cities), Tatiana Toro (University of Washington)

    Harmonic analysis is a central field of mathematics with a number of applications to geometry, partial differential equations, probability, and number theory, as well as physics, biology, and engineering. The Graduate Summer School will feature mini-courses in geometric measure theory, homogenization, localization, free boundary problems, and partial differential equations as they apply to questions in or draw techniques from harmonic analysis. The goal of the program is to bring together students and researchers at all levels interested in these areas to share exciting recent developments in these subjects, stimulate further interactions, and inspire the new generation to pursue research in harmonic analysis and its applications.

    Updated on Nov 08, 2017 11:32 AM PST
  11. Summer Graduate School Representations of High Dimensional Data

    Organizers: Blake Hunter (Claremont McKenna College), Deanna Needell (University of California, Los Angeles)
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    In today's world, data is exploding at a faster rate than computer architectures can handle. This summer school will introduce students to modern and innovative mathematical techniques that address this phenomenon. Hands-on topics will include data mining, compression, classification, topic modeling, large-scale stochastic optimization, and more.

    Updated on Nov 02, 2017 10:02 AM PDT