Mathematical Sciences Research Institute

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  1. Workshop Circle on the Road

    Organizers: Selin Kalayciglu (The Center for Mathematical Talent), Berna Ok (The Center for Mathematical Talent), LEAD Diana White (MSRI - Mathematical Sciences Research Institute), Brandy Wiegers (MSRI - Mathematical Sciences Research Institute)

    Bringing together new and experienced leaders of Math Circles and other similar outreach programs, this year’s Circle on the Road will include discussions, presentations, and opportunities to facilitate different mathematical problems. In addition, some informal STEM education researchers will join us to further our research and evaluation efforts.

    Updated on Sep 02, 2016 10:24 AM PDT
  1. Workshop Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2017: Observing for Access, Power, and Participation in Mathematics Classrooms as a Strategy to Improve Mathematics Teaching and Learning

    Organizers: Michael Driskill (Math for America ), Esther Enright (University of Michigan), Rochelle Gutierrez (University of Illinois), LEAD Jodie Novak (University of Northern Colorado), LEAD Miriam Sherin (Northwestern University), Joi Spencer (University of San Diego), Elizabeth van Es (University of California, Irvine)

    Success rates in mathematics as well as recruitment and retention rates in the mathematics pipeline are low at all education levels and are, across predictable demographics, disproportionately low for students who are women, Latin@, Black, American Indian, recent immigrants, emergent bilinguals/multilinguals, and poor. Efforts to address these low rates often focus on programmatic solutions such as creating mentoring or bridge programs to address perceived deficiencies. While these programs achieve some success, evidence suggests that they may not substantially improve students’ subsequent success in mathematics or meaningfully address the ways that students experience mathematics instruction.

    The 2017 CIME workshop will focus on observations of mathematics classrooms through the lens of equity. Specifically, we will use observation as a tool for understanding and improving imbalances of access, participation, and power in mathematics teaching and learning. In doing so, we seek to better understand students’ experiences in mathematics classrooms in order to improve academic success, recruitment and retention, and meaningful experiences for historically marginalized populations.

    Five questions structure the highly interactive design of the workshop:

    1. What does it mean to create an equitable classroom environment? How can the structure of classroom interactions lead to imbalances of access, identity, and power in mathematics teaching and learning? How can such structures be rebuilt to better serve all students?
    2. How might observations of mathematics instruction help us to identify power dynamics in classrooms? What language is helpful to describe interactions in mathematics classrooms? What might we learn from observations about how culture and identity are developed for some students but not others? What do classroom observations reveal about how instruction supports or discourages engagement in mathematics for students of different backgrounds?
    3. What does it mean to observe interactions in a mathematics classroom with an eye towards equity? What language is helpful to describe interactions in mathematics classrooms? How do we observe and describe interactions among students, between students and mathematics, between students and instructors, and between students and resources (i.e., textbooks, computers, chalkboards, manipulatives)?
    4. What professional experiences can support mathematics instructors to learn how to observe for, describe, interpret, and productively address interactions in the mathematics classroom from the lens of equity? What professional experiences can support mathematics instructors to increase the number of equitable interactions and decrease the number of inequitable ones in their classrooms?
    5. What measures might be useful in tracking our progress in learning to see, describe, interpret, and productively address (in)equitable interactions in mathematics classrooms? What measures and tools might be useful in tracking the impacts on instruction and student learning? How might we develop infrastructure to help with this work (video library, faculty resources, etc.)?

    Updated on Sep 29, 2016 10:25 AM PDT
  2. Summer Graduate School Commutative Algebra and Related Topics

    Organizers: LEAD Shihoko Ishii (Tokyo Woman's Christian University), Kazuhiko Kurano (Meiji University), Ken-ichi Yoshida (Nihon University)

    The purpose of the school will be to introduce graduate students to foundational results in commutative algebra, with particular emphasis of the diversity of the related topics with commutative algebra. Some of these topics are developing remarkably in this decade and through learning those subjects the graduate students will be stimulated toward future research. 

    Updated on Sep 30, 2016 07:10 PM PDT
  3. Summer Graduate School Subfactors: planar algebras, quantum symmetries, and random matrices

    Organizers: LEAD Scott Morrison (Australian National University), Emily Peters (Loyola University), Noah Snyder (Columbia University)

    Subfactor theory is a subject from operator algebras, with many surprising connections to other areas of mathematics. This summer school will be devoted to understanding the representation theory of subfactors, with a particular emphasis on connections to quantum symmetries, fusion categories, planar algebras, and random matrices

    Updated on Aug 12, 2016 09:16 AM PDT
  4. MSRI-UP MSRI-UP 2017: Solving Systems of Polynomial Equations

    Organizers: LEAD Federico Ardila (San Francisco State University), Duane Cooper (Morehouse College), Maria Mercedes Franco (Queensborough Community College (CUNY)), Herbert Medina (Loyola Marymount University), Suzanne Weekes (Worcester Polytechnic Institute)

    The MSRI-UP summer program is designed to serve a diverse group of undergraduate students who would like to conduct research in the mathematical sciences.
    In 2017, MSRI-UP will focus on Solving Systems of Polynomial Equations, a topic at the heart of almost every computational problem in the physical and life sciences. We will pay special attention to complexity issues, highlighting connections with tropical geometry, number theory, and the P vs. NP problem. The research program will be led by Prof. J. Maurice Rojas of Texas A&M University.
    Students who have had a linear algebra course and a course in which they have had to write proofs are eligible to apply. Due to funding restrictions, only U.S. citizens and permanent residents may apply regardless of funding. Members of underrepresented groups are especially encouraged to apply.

    Updated on Sep 30, 2016 06:53 PM PDT
  5. Summer Graduate School Soergel Bimodules

    Organizers: LEAD Benjamin Elias (University of Oregon), Geordie Williamson (Max-Planck-Institut für Mathematik)

    We will give an introduction to categorical representation theory, focusing on the example of Soergel bimodules, which is a categorification of the Iwahori-Hecke algebra. We will give a comprehensive introduction to the "tool box" of modern (higher) representation theory: diagrammatics, homotopy categories, categorical diagonalization, module categories, Drinfeld center, algebraic Hodge theory.

    Updated on Aug 18, 2016 04:30 PM PDT
  6. Summer Graduate School Positivity Questions in Geometric Combinatorics

    Organizers: Eran Nevo (Hebrew University), Raman Sanyal (Freie Universität Berlin)

    McMullen’s g-Conjecture from 1970 is a shining example of mathematical foresight that combined all results available at that time to conjure a complete characterization of face numbers of convex simple/simplicial polytopes. The key statement in its verification is that certain combinatorial numbers associated to geometric (or topological) objects are non-negative. The aim of this workshop is to introduce graduate students to selected contemporary topics in geometric combinatorics with an emphasis on positivity questions. It is fascinating that the dual notions of simple and simplicial polytopes lead to different but equally powerful algebraic frameworks to treat such questions. A key feature of the lectures will be the simultaneous development of these algebraic frameworks from complementary perspectives: combinatorial-topological and convex-geometric.  General concepts (such as Lefschetz elements, Hodge–Riemann–Minkowski inequalities) will be developed side-by-side, and analogies will be drawn to concepts in algebraic geometry, Fourier analysis, rigidity theory and measure theory. This allows for entry points for students with varying backgrounds.  The courses will be supplemented with guest lectures highlighting further connections to other fields.

    Updated on Aug 18, 2016 04:35 PM PDT
  7. Summer Graduate School Séminaire de Mathématiques Supérieures 2017: Contemporary Dynamical Systems

    Organizers: Sylvain Crovisier (Université de Paris VI (Pierre et Marie Curie)-Université de Paris XI (Paris-Sud)), LEAD Konstantin Khanin (University of Toronto), Andrés Navas Flores (University of Santiago de Chile), Christiane Rousseau (Université de Montréal), Marcelo Viana (Institute of Pure and Applied Mathematics (IMPA)), Amie Wilkinson (University of Chicago)

    The theory of dynamical systems has witnessed very significant developments in the last decades, includi​n​g the work of two 2014 Fields medalists, Artur Avila and Maryam Mirzakhani. ​The school will concentrate on the recent significant developments in the field of dynamical systems and present some of the present main streams of research. Two central themes will be those of partial hyperbolicity on one side, and rigidity, group actions and renormalization on the other side.​ ​Other themes will ​include homogeneous dynamics and geometry and dynamics on infinitely flat surfaces (both providing connections to the work of Maryam Mirzakhani), topological dynamics, thermodynamical formalism, singularities and bifurcations in analytic dynamical systems.  

    Updated on Aug 17, 2016 03:34 PM PDT
  8. Summer Graduate School Nonlinear dispersive PDE, quantum many particle systems and the world between

    Organizers: Natasa Pavlovic (University of Texas), Nikolaos Tzirakis (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

    The purpose of the summer school is to introduce graduate students to the recent developments in the area of dispersive partial differential equations (PDE), which have received a great deal of attention from mathematicians, in part due to ubiquitous applications to nonlinear optics, water wave theory and plasma physics.

    Recently remarkable progress has been made in understanding existence and uniqueness of solutions to nonlinear Schrodinger (NLS) and KdV equations, and properties of those solutions. We will outline the basic tools that were developed to address these questions. Also we will present some of recent results on derivation of NLS equations from quantum many particle systems and will discuss how methods developed to study the NLS can be
    relevant in the context of the derivation of this nonlinear equation.

    Updated on Sep 12, 2016 04:14 PM PDT
  9. Summer Graduate School Automorphic Forms and the Langlands Program

    Organizers: LEAD Kevin Buzzard (Imperial College, London)

    The summer school will be an introduction to the more algebraic aspects of the theory of automorphic forms and representations. One of the goals will be to understand the statements of the main conjectures in the Langlands programme. Another will be to gain a good working understanding of the fundamental definitions in the theory, such as principal series representations, the Satake isomorphism, and of course automorphic forms and representations for groups such as GL_n and its inner forms.

    Updated on Sep 02, 2016 11:36 AM PDT

Past Educational Events

  1. Summer Graduate School Chip Firing and Tropical Curves

    Organizers: LEAD Matthew Baker (Georgia Institute of Technology), David Jensen (University of Kentucky), Sam Payne (Yale University)

    Tropical geometry uses a combination of techniques from algebraic geometry, combinatorics, and convex polyhedral geometry to study degenerations of algebraic varieties; the simplest tropical objects are tropical curves, which one can think of as "shadows" of algebraic curves.  Linear equivalence of divisors on an abstract tropical curve is determined by a simple but rich combinatorial process called "chip firing", which was discovered independently in the discrete setting by physicists and graph theorists.  From a pedagogical point of view, one can view tropical curves as a combinatorial model for the highly analogous but more abstract theory of algebraic curves, but there is in fact much more to the story than this: one can use tropical curves and chip firing to prove theorems in algebraic geometry and number theory.  This field is relatively new, so participants will have the opportunity to start from scratch and still get a glimpse of the cutting edge in this active research area.

    Updated on Aug 30, 2016 03:39 PM PDT
  2. Summer Graduate School Electronic Structure Theory

    Organizers: LEAD Lin Lin (University of California, Berkeley), Jianfeng Lu (Duke University), James Sethian (University of California, Berkeley)

    Ab initio or first principle electronic structure theories, particularly represented by Kohn-Sham density functional theory (KS-DFT), have been developed into workhorse tools with a wide range of scientific applications in chemistry, physics, materials science, biology etc. What is needed are new techniques that greatly extend the applicability and versatility of these approaches. At the core, many of the challenges that need to be addressed are essentially mathematical. The purpose of the workshop is to provide graduate students a self-contained introduction to electronic structure theory, with particular emphasis on frontier topics in aspects of applied analysis and numerical methods. 

    Updated on Jul 27, 2016 04:16 PM PDT
  3. Summer Graduate School An Introduction to Character Theory and the McKay Conjecture

    Organizers: Robert Guralnick (University of Southern California), Pham Tiep (University of Arizona)

    Character Theory of Finite Groups provides one of the most powerful tools to study groups. In this course we will give a gentle introduction to basic results in the Character Theory, as well as some of the main conjectures in Group Representation Theory, with particular emphasis on the McKay Conjecture.


    Group Photo

    Updated on Jul 22, 2016 02:27 PM PDT
  4. Summer Graduate School Mixed Integer Nonlinear Programming: Theory, algorithms and applications

    Organizers: Francisco Castro (University of Sevilla), Elena Fernandez (Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya), Justo Puerto (University of Sevilla)

    This school is oriented to the presentation of theory, algorithms and applications for the solution of mixed integer nonlinear problems (MINLP). This type of problems appears in numerous application areas where the modelization of nonlinear phenomena with logical constraints is important; we must remember here the memorable phrase “the world is nonlinear”. Nowadays the theoretical aspects of this area are spread in a number of recent papers which makes it difficult, for non-specialist, to have a solid background of the existing results and new advances in the field. This school aims to organize and present this material in an organized way. Moreover, it also pursues to link theory with actual applications. In particular, remarkable applications can be found in air traffic control agencies, the air companies, the electric power generation companies, the chemical complex units, the analysis of financial products usually associated with risk dealing and in the algorithms in the statistical field and artificial intelligence as for instance artificial neural networks, or supporting vector machines, among many others.

    Updated on May 17, 2016 10:51 AM PDT
  5. Summer Graduate School Harmonic Analysis and Elliptic Equations on real Euclidean Spaces and on Rough Sets

    Organizers: LEAD Steven Hofmann (University of Missouri), Jose Maria Martell (Instituto de Ciencias Matematicas (ICMAT))

    The goal of the workshop is to present harmonic analysis techniques in $R^n$ (the ``flat" setting), and then to show how those techniques extend to much rougher settings, with application to the theory of elliptic equations. Thus, the subject matter of the workshop will introduce the students to an active, current research area:  the interface between harmonic analysis, elliptic PDE, and geometric measure theory.

    Group Photo

    Updated on Aug 05, 2016 10:47 AM PDT
  6. MSRI-UP MSRI-UP 2016: Sandpile Groups

    Organizers: Federico Ardila (San Francisco State University), Duane Cooper (Morehouse College), Maria Mercedes Franco (Queensborough Community College (CUNY)), Herbert Medina (Loyola Marymount University), LEAD Suzanne Weekes (Worcester Polytechnic Institute)

    The MSRI-UP summer program is designed for undergraduate students who have completed two years of university-level mathematics courses and would like to conduct research in the mathematical sciences. Due to funding restrictions, only U.S. citizens and permanent residents are eligible to apply and the program cannot accept foreign students regardless of funding. The academic portion of the 2016 program will be led by Prof. Luis Garcia-Puente of Sam Houston State University.

    Updated on Aug 23, 2016 12:51 PM PDT
  7. Summer Graduate School Seminaire de Mathematiques Superieures 2016: Dynamics of Biological Systems

    Organizers: Thomas Hillen (University of Alberta), Mark Lewis (University of Alberta), Yingfei Yi (University of Alberta)

    The purpose of this summer school is to focus on the interplay of dynamical and biological systems, developing the rich connectionbetween science and mathematics that has been so successful to date. Our focus will be on understanding the mathematical structure of dynamical systems that come from biological problems, and then relating the mathematical structures back to the biology to provide scientific insight. We will focus on five key areas: complex bio-networks, multi scale biological dynamics, biological waves, nonlinear dynamics of pattern formation, and disease dynamics. For each of the five key areas, we will invite 2-3 world leaders who are also excellent communicators to deliver a series of 2-4 one-hour lectures. We expect an average of eight hours of lecture per subject area, spread over approximately two weeks.

    Updated on Nov 11, 2015 03:54 PM PST
  8. Workshop Bay Area Discrete (BAD) Math Day 32

    Organizers: Federico Ardila (San Francisco State University), Ralucca Gera (Naval Postgraduate School), Elizabeth Gross (San Jose State University), Angela Hicks (Stanford University), Carol Meyers (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory), Rick Scott (University of Santa Clara), Erik Slivenken (University of California, Davis), Ellen Veomett (Saint Mary's College of California), Yan Zhang (University of California, Berkeley)

    Bay Area Discrete Math Days are one-day meetings aimed at facilitating communication between researchers and graduate students of discrete mathematics around the San Francisco Bay Area.These days happen semi-annually and strive to create an informal atmosphere to talk about discrete mathematics. The term "discrete mathematics" is chosen to include at least the following topics: Algebraic and Enumerative Combinatorics, Discrete Geometry, Graph Theory, Coding and Design Theory, Combinatorial Aspects of Computational Algebra and Geometry, Combinatorial Optimization, Probabilistic Combinatorics, and Combinatorics in Mathematical Physics

    Updated on Feb 19, 2016 03:13 PM PST
  9. Workshop Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2016: Observing, Evaluating and Improving Mathematics Teaching from the Early Grades through the University

    Organizers: Hyman Bass (University of Michigan), Michael Driskill (Math for America ), LEAD Mark Hoover (University of Michigan), LEAD Deborah Hughes Hallett (University of Arizona), Danny Martin (University of Illinois at Chicago), Miriam Sherin (Northwestern University)

    The 2016 CIME workshop focuses directly on the teaching of mathematics at the university and precollege levels. Teaching is not easy to examine in disciplined ways because it is so familiar and seems so obvious.  Although teaching shapes students’ opportunities to learn, what teachers are actually doing is difficult to observe and describe. This impedes work on improving teaching.
    This workshop will offer the opportunity to study and talk closely about mathematics teaching through close observation and discussion of video tapes in a setting that will bring together professionals with a range of perspectives, knowledge, experience, and orientations. The goal of the workshop is to develop language and methods for describing, analyzing and evaluating what can be seen in the classroom, with the ultimate goal of helping us shape and improve teaching — our own and more broadly.
    Four questions structure the highly interactive design of the workshop:

    1. What skills are needed for observing teaching in ways that inform improvement efforts? What is involved in observing teaching? What is the teacher saying and doing? What are students saying and doing? What is the mathematics at play? What else is happening? And what do these imply for teaching?
    2. How can the practice and use of observation be structured in order to improve mathematics teaching? What approaches are available? What are their strengths and weaknesses?
    3. Observation-based assessment of teaching: Why, what, and how? What are the risks?
    4. How can we develop and sustain a cross-professional community that observes and evaluates teaching in such a way that different communities communicate with and learn from each other to support a cycle of improvement in the teaching of mathematics at all levels?

    The workshop will provide a library of videos of mathematics teaching for study. In addition, participants are encouraged to submit a short video clip of their own teaching, together with a brief background commentary.  These videos will provide a central text for our collective work on discussing and assessing mathematics teaching.


    Group Photo

    Updated on Apr 08, 2016 11:41 AM PDT
  10. Workshop Modern Math Workshop 2015

    Organizers: LEAD Hélène Barcelo (MSRI - Mathematical Sciences Research Institute), Helen Chamberlin (Ohio State University), Ricardo Cortez (Tulane University), Sujit Ghosh (NC State University), Dagan Karp (Harvey Mudd College), Anne Pfister (MSRI - Mathematical Sciences Research Institute), Christian Ratsch (University of California, Los Angeles), Ivelisse M. Rubio (University of Puerto Rico), Mariel Vazquez (University of California, Davis), Talithia Williams (Harvey Mudd College)

    As part of the Mathematical Sciences Collaborative Diversity Initiatives, nine mathematics institutes are pleased to host their annual SACNAS pre-conference event, the 2015 Modern Math Workshop (MMW). The Modern Math Workshop is intended to encourage minority undergraduates to pursue careers in the mathematical sciences and to assist undergraduates, graduate students and recent PhD’s in building their research networks.

    Updated on Oct 12, 2015 11:12 AM PDT
  11. Summer Graduate School Incompressible Fluid Flows at High Reynolds Number

    Organizers: Jacob Bedrossian (University of Maryland), LEAD Vlad Vicol (Princeton University)

    The purpose of this two week workshop is to introduce graduate students to state-of-the-art methods and results in mathematical fluid dynamics. In the first week, we will discuss the mathematical foundations and modern analysis aspects of the Navier-Stokes and Euler equations. In the second week, we will run two courses concurrently on the topics of inviscid limits and hydrodynamic stability. Specifically, one course will focus on boundary layers in high Reynolds number flows and the Prandtl equations while the other will focus on mixing and connections to turbulence. Through the lectures and associated problem sessions, the students will learn about a number of new analysis tools and principles of fluid mechanics that are not always taught in a graduate school curriculum.

    Updated on Aug 31, 2015 11:47 AM PDT
  12. Summer Graduate School Gaps between Primes and Analytic Number Theory

    Organizers: Dimitris Koukoulopoulos (Université de Montréal), LEAD Emmanuel Kowalski (ETH Zuerich), James Maynard (University of Oxford), Kannan Soundararajan (Stanford University)

    These courses will give students a full overview of the results of Zhang and Maynard on gaps between primes, and will provide them will a clear understanding of the tools involved. This will make accessible a significant part of modern analytic number theory. The lecturers will also make sure to include, within their course, examples and discussions going further than is strictly required to understand the proofs of Zhang and Maynard, e.g., in the direction of automorphic forms and the Riemann Hypothesis over finite fields.

    Updated on Aug 05, 2016 10:41 AM PDT
  13. Summer Graduate School Berkeley summer course in mining and modeling of neuroscience data

    Organizers: Ingrid Daubechies (Duke University), Bruno Olshausen (University of California, Berkeley), Christos Papadimitriou (University of California, Berkeley), Fritz Sommer (University of California, Berkeley), LEAD Jeff Teeters (University of California, Berkeley)

    This course is for students and researchers with backgrounds in mathematics and computational sciences who are
    interested in applying their skills toward problems in neuroscience. It will introduce the major open questions of
    neuroscience and teach state-of–the-art techniques for analyzing and modeling neuroscience data sets. The course is designed for students at the graduate level and researchers with background in a quantitative field such as
    engineering, mathematics, physics or computer science who may or may not have a specific neuroscience
    background. The goal of this summer course is to help researchers find new exciting research areas and at the same time to strengthen quantitative expertise in the field of neuroscience. The course is sponsored by the National Science Foundation from a grant supporting activities at the data sharing repository CRCNS.org, the Helen Wills
    Neuroscience Institute, the Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing and the Mathematical Science Research

    Updated on Feb 23, 2015 03:59 PM PST
  14. Summer Graduate School Mathematical Topics in Systems Biology

    Organizers: LEAD Steven Altschuler (University of California, San Francisco), Lani Wu (University of California, San Francisco)

    This Summer Graduate School will introduce mathematics graduate students to the rapidly emerging area of systems biology. In particular, we will focus on the design and emergent behaviors of molecular networks used by cells to interpret their environments and create robust temporal-spatial behaviors. This will be a very hands-on workshop with students working alone and in teams to program and present key ideas.

    Updated on Jun 03, 2015 12:21 PM PDT
  15. Summer Graduate School NIMS Summer School on Random Matrix Theory

    Organizers: LEAD Jinho Baik (University of Michigan)

    This summer graduate school will take place at the National Institute for Mathematical Sciences in Daejeon, South Korea.  The purpose of this summer school is to introduce some of the basic ideas and methods of random matrix theory to graduate students.  In particular there will be three lecture series on random matrix theory from three different perspectives: from the view points of the integrable structures, the moment method, and the Stieltjes transorm technique.  In addition to the lectures, there will be discussion sessions, and the students will also have plenty of time to interact with the lecturers and with other students.

    Please note that accepted students will be provided up to $1700 in travel reimbursement, in addition to meals and accommodation.

    Updated on Nov 20, 2014 12:02 PM PST
  16. Summer Graduate School CRM-PIMS Summer School in Probability

    Organizers: LEAD Louigi Addario-Berry (McGill University), Louis-Pierre Arguin (University of Montreal), Alexander Fribergh (University of Montreal), Lea Popovic (Concordia University)

    The 2015 CRM-PIMS Summer School in Probability will take place in Montreal, Canada, from June 15-July 11, 2015. The school is built around two principal 24-hour lecture courses, which will be delivered by Alice Guionnet (random matrices, free probability and the enumeration of maps) and Remco van der Hofstad (high-dimensional percolation and random graphs). There will additionally be mini-courses by Louigi Addario-Berry (random minimum spanning trees), Shankar Bhamidi (dynamic random network models) and Jonathan Mattingly (stabilization by noise). Some time is reserved for participants to present their own work.

    Updated on Apr 12, 2016 04:17 PM PDT
  17. Summer Graduate School Geometric Group Theory

    Organizers: LEAD John Mackay (University of Bristol), Anne Thomas (University of Sydney), Kevin Wortman (University of Utah)

    The aim of this workshop is to introduce graduate students to some specific core topics which will be under study at the upcoming MSRI program on Geometric Group Theory (GGT) in 2016.  GGT encompasses a wide range of topics. The four minicourse topics have been chosen because they are central themes in GGT and in the upcoming MSRI program. Moreover, each topic is accessible to students with a range of backgrounds: the basic definitions are straightforward, with many simple and illuminating examples to work through, yet lead through to important questions in current research.

    Updated on Jul 06, 2015 03:14 PM PDT
  18. Summer Graduate School Seminaire de Mathematiques Superieures 2015: Geometric and Computational Spectral Theory

    Organizers: Alexandre Girouard (Laval University), Dmitry Jakobson (McGill University), Michael Levitin (University of Reading), Nilima Nigam (Simon Fraser University), Iosif Polterovich (Université de Montréal), Frederic Rochon (Université du Québec à Montréal)

    The lectures will focus on the following four topics: geometry of eigenvalues, geometry of eigenfunctions, spectral theory on manifolds with singularities and computational spectral theory. There has been a number of remarkable recent developments in these closely related fields. The goal of the school is to shed light on different facets of modern spectral theory and to provide a unique opportunity for graduate students and young researchers to get a “big picture” of this rapidly evolving area of mathematics. A particularly novel aspect of the school is the emphasis on the interactions between spectral geometry and computational spectral theory.

    Updated on Jan 28, 2015 10:59 AM PST
  19. MSRI-UP MSRI-UP 2015: Geometric Combinatorics Motivated by the Social Sciences

    Organizers: Federico Ardila (San Francisco State University), LEAD Duane Cooper (Morehouse College), Herbert Medina (Loyola Marymount University), Ivelisse M. Rubio (University of Puerto Rico), Suzanne Weekes (Worcester Polytechnic Institute)

    The MSRI-UP summer program is designed for undergraduate students who have completed two years of university-level mathematics courses and would like to conduct research in the mathematical sciences. Due to funding restrictions, only U.S. citizens and permanent residents are eligible to apply and the program cannot accept foreign students regardless of funding. The academic portion of the 2015 program will be led by Prof. Francis Su from Harvey Mudd College.

    Updated on Jul 27, 2015 01:57 PM PDT
  20. Workshop Partnerships: a Workshop on Collaborations between the NSF/MPS and Private Foundations

    Organizers: Cynthia Atherton (Heising-Simons Foundation), Paulette Clancy (Cornell University), LEAD David Eisenbud (MSRI - Mathematical Sciences Research Institute), Thomas Everhart (California Institute of Technology), Caty Pilachowski (Indiana University, Bloomington), Robert Shelton (Research Corporation for Science Advancement), Yuri Tschinkel (New York University, Courant Institute)

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) and non-profit organizations each provide critical support to the U.S. basic research enterprise in the mathematical and physical sciences. While the missions of these funders differ, many of their goals align and the grantee communities have significant overlap. With the ultimate aim of helping to advance the scientific frontier in the most effective way, we propose to hold a workshop to examine partnerships between the Directorate of Mathematical and Physical Sciences (MPS) at NSF and non-profit funders in MPS-related disciplines to
    •       understand different models of collaboration (the “how”);
    •       understand different motivations for collaboration (the “why”); and
    •       develop opportunities for future communication and/or collaboration.

    Updated on Jan 19, 2016 12:39 PM PST
  21. Workshop Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2015: Developmental Mathematics: For whom? Toward what ends?

    Organizers: Duane Cooper (Morehouse College), Mark Hoover (University of Michigan), LEAD Robert Megginson (University of Michigan), Richard Sgarlotti (Bay College), Katherine Stevenson (California State University, Northridge)

    This workshop will address the critical issue of developmental mathematics at two- and four-year colleges and universities and the broader dynamic of mathematics remediation that occurs at all levels. It will engage mathematicians, K-12 teachers, mathematics educators, and administrators in a conversation about the goals of developmental mathematics and the contributions that our different professional communities make to this work. Key questions that will be addressed are:

    1. How do we teach content in ways that acknowledge and leverage each student's prior learning experiences? In particular, how do we take advantage of a student's maturity while refining his or her learning habits where necessary?

    2. How can developmental mathematics instruction move students through mathematics which must be relearned while simultaneously gaining momentum on more advanced mathematics (including the development of mathematical practices needed for meaningful mathematical work)?

    3. What are strategies for supporting the needs of the wide range of students in developmental mathematics programs--those developing mathematical skills for life in general as well as those developing the foundation necessary to proceed towards a STEM major?  How can we successfully address equity issues raised for students from groups underrepresented in STEM fields? How can developmental mathematics instruction blend synchronous and asynchronous instruction to achieve maximal efficiency and impact?

    4. What is the proper balance between addressing the needs of the wide range of students mentioned in the preceding point and keeping instruction and course offerings concise?

    5. What are the characteristics, training, and practices of a successful developmental mathematics teacher?

    6. What support services enhance the success of a developmental mathematics program?

    Updated on Apr 01, 2015 03:27 PM PDT
  22. Summer Graduate School Geometry and Analysis

    Organizers: Hans-Joachim Hein (Imperial College, London), LEAD Aaron Naber (Northwestern University)

    Geometric and complex analysis is the application of tools from analysis to study questions from geometry and topology. This two week summer course will provide graduate students with the necessary background to begin studies in the area. The first week will consist of introductory courses on geometric analysis, complex analysis, and Riemann surfaces. The second week will consist of more advanced courses on the regularity theory of Einstein manifolds, Kahler-Einstein manifolds, and the analysis of Riemann surfaces.

    Updated on Aug 05, 2016 10:38 AM PDT
  23. Summer Graduate School Stochastic Partial Differential Equations

    Organizers: Yuri Bakhtin (New York University, Courant Institute), LEAD Ivan Corwin (Columbia University), James Nolen (Duke University)

    Stochastic Partial Differential Equations (SPDEs) serve as fundamental models of physical systems subject to random inputs, interactions or environments. It is a particular challenge to develop tools to construct solutions, prove robustness of approximation schemes, and study properties like ergodicity and fluctuation statistics for a wide variety of SPDEs. 

    The purpose of this two week workshop is to educate graduate students on the state-of-the-art methods and results in SPDEs. The three courses which will be run simultaneously will highlight different (though related) aspects of this area including (1) Fluctuation theory of PDEs with random coefficients (2) Ergodic theory of SPDEs and (3) Exact solvability of SPDEs

    Updated on Aug 05, 2016 10:40 AM PDT
  24. Summer Graduate School Algebraic Topology

    Organizers: LEAD Jose Cantarero-Lopez (Centro de Investigación en Matemáticas), LEAD Michael Hill (University of Virginia)

    Modern algebraic topology is a broad and vibrant field which has seen recent progress on classical problems as well as exciting new interactions with applied mathematics. This summer school will consist of a series of lecture by experts on major research directions, including several lectures on applied algebraic topology. Participants will also have the opportunity to have guided interaction with the seminal texts in the field, reading and speaking about the foundational papers.

    Videos of selected lectures may be found here.

    Updated on Jan 15, 2015 11:27 AM PST
  25. Summer Graduate School IAS/PCMI 2014: Mathematics and Materials

    Organizers: Mark Bowick (Syracuse University), David Kinderlehrer (Carnegie Mellon University), Govind Menon (Brown University), Charles Radin (University of Texas)

    The program in 2014 will bring together a diverse group of mathematicians and scientists with interests in fundamental questions in mathematics and the behavior of materials. The meeting addresses several themes including computational investigations of material properties, the emergence of long- range order in materials and self-assembly, the geometry of soft condensed matter and the calculus of variations, phase transitions and statistical mechanics. The program will cover several topics in discrete and differential geometry that are motivated by questions in materials science. Many central topics, such as the geometry of packings, problems in the calculus of variations and phase transitions, will be discussed from the complementary points of view of mathematicians and physicists.

    Updated on Mar 06, 2014 12:12 PM PST
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