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Current Scientific Events

  1. Program Complementary Program 2020-21

    The Complementary Program has a limited number of memberships that are open to mathematicians whose interests are not closely related to the core programs; special consideration is given to mathematicians who are partners of an invited member of a core program.

    Updated on Nov 20, 2019 01:47 PM PST
  2. Program Mathematical problems in fluid dynamics

    Organizers: Thomas Alazard (Ecole Normale Supérieure Paris-Saclay; Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS)), Hajer Bahouri (Laboratoire Jacques-Louis Lions; Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS)), Mihaela Ifrim (University of Wisconsin-Madison), Igor Kukavica (University of Southern California), David Lannes (Institut de Mathématiques de Bordeaux; Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS)), LEAD Daniel Tataru (University of California, Berkeley)
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    All scientific activities in this program will be available online so that those who can't attend in person are able to participate. If you are not a member of the program and would like to participate in any of the online activities, please fill out this REGISTRATION FORM.

    PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

    Fluid dynamics is one of the classical areas of partial differential equations, and has been the subject of extensive research over hundreds of years. It is perhaps one of the most challenging and exciting fields of scientific pursuit simply because of the complexity of the subject and the endless breadth of applications.

    The focus of the program is on incompressible fluids, where water is a primary example. The fundamental equations in this area are the well-known Euler equations for inviscid fluids, and the Navier-Stokes equations for the viscous fluids. Relating the two is the problem of the zero viscosity limit, and its connection to the phenomena of turbulence. Water waves, or more generally interface problems in fluids, represent another target area for the program. Both theoretical and numerical aspects will be considered.

    Updated on Mar 16, 2021 02:28 PM PDT
  3. Summer Graduate School Séminaire de Mathématiques Supérieures 2021: Microlocal Analysis: Theory and Applications (Virtual School)

    Organizers: Suresh Eswarathasan (Dalhousie University), Dmitry Jakobson (McGill University), Katya Krupchyk (University of California, Irvine), Stephane Nonnenmacher (Université de Paris XI)

    Microlocal analysis originated in the study of linear partial differential equations (PDEs) in the high-frequency regime, through a combination of ideas from Fourier analysis and classical Hamiltonian mechanics. In parallel, similar ideas and methods had been developed since the early times of quantum mechanics, the smallness of Planck’s constant allowing to use semiclassical methods. The junction between these two points of view (microlocal and semiclassical) only emerged in 1970s, and has taken its full place in the PDE community in the last 20 years. This methodology resulted in major advances in the understanding of linear and nonlinear PDEs in the last 50 years. Moreover, microlocal methods continue to find new applications in diverse areas of mathematical analysis, such as the spectral theory of nonselfadjoint operators, scattering theory, and inverse problems.

    Updated on Apr 13, 2021 03:49 PM PDT