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Scientific Workshops


MSRI Programmatic Workshops

MSRI welcomes registrations for our upcoming workshops, listed below. Established researchers, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students are invited to apply for funding.

Most MSRI workshops are free of charge to attend, thanks to the support of the National Science Foundation and other institutional sponsors.

Programmatic Workshops related to MSRI's Scientific Programs fall into one of the following three categories:

INTRODUCTORY WORKSHOPS

Introductory workshops set the stage and provide the context for the scientific program, with the intended audience being researchers not in the program. This would include members in the other programs, members of the local mathematical community, and participants from outside the area selected especially for the workshop, particularly from groups underrepresented in research intensive contexts: women, minorities, mathematicians not located at research centers, and graduate students. In selecting participants, priority is given to these latter groups. Introductory Workshops have been effective in broadcasting the goals, ideas and techniques of a particular program to the mathematical public at large, as well as in bringing the MSRI community together as a whole.

CONNECTIONS WORKSHOPS

Connections Workshops have a long, successful history of encouraging early-career women and gender-expansive individuals in the profession. Held at the very beginning of semester-long or year-long programs at MSRI, these workshops have three overarching goals: (1) to give accessible introductions to the main themes of the program and exciting new directions in related research; (2) to provide participants the opportunity to become acquainted with the work of women in the field; and (3) to connect early-career researchers, especially women, gender-expansive individuals, and minorities, to potential senior mentors. A typical workshop consists of introductory lectures, presentations by post-doctoral researchers and graduate students, and a panel discussion addressing the challenges faced by all young researchers, but especially by women, in establishing a career in mathematics.

Throughout the workshops, special effort is made to foster mentoring relationships between established and early-career researchers at the lunches, dinners, and coffee breaks. Participants of the Connections Workshop are encouraged to stay for the following week for the Introductory Workshop to the semester’s program. The workshop organizers are also encouraged to propose week-end activities for small groups of women with similar research interests to discuss problems and perhaps to begin work on a joint research project (e.g. forming small research or study groups that would work on predetermined problems, read a paper, or leanr new techniques). As is the case for all MSRI workshops, registration to attend Connections workshop lectures is open to all interested persons.

TOPICAL WORKSHOPS

Directed toward the mathematical community at large, topical workshops are designed to interest and attract young researchers and other mathematicians active in the field.

  • MSRI provides a yearly Hot Topics Workshop, to showcase what is new, innovative and interesting to the mathematical sciences community at the present time.
  • The Critical Issues in Mathematics Education (CIME) workshop series offers an annual spring workshop designed to engage mathematicians, mathematics education researchers, and K-12 teachers to learn about research and development efforts that can enhance their own work and about the contributions they can make to solving the challenges of mathematics education.

How to Apply

Use the calendar below to navigate to the specific workshop you are interested in attending. On the right side menu, you will see a Registration link. Follow the instructions to register for each workshop.

  • ORCID ID: In order to register for most MSRI workshops, MSRI needs to collect your ORCID ID as required by the National Science Foundation, the primary funder of these workshops. ORCID is an independent non-profit organization that provides a persistent identifier – an ORCID ID – that distinguishes you from other researchers and a mechanism for linking your research outputs and activities to your ID. ORCID is integrated into many systems used by publishers, funders, institutions, and other research-related services. Learn more and create an ORCID ID account at orcid.org. Questions? Contact coord@msri.org.

Resources for Workshop Attendees

Nursing Room: MSRI is pleased to be able to offer a private room for nursing parents.

Childcare Grants: To allow visitors to fully participate in its scientific activities, MSRI is pleased to be able to offer childcare grants to researchers with children under the age of 17. One of the objectives of MSRI’s family support program is to contribute toward MSRI’s goal of enabling the participation of women and members of other historically underrepresented groups in its programs, workshops, and summer graduate schools

These flexible grants may be used for reimbursement of childcare expenses incurred in Berkeley, or at home, including airfare for children and support for companion caregivers or hired childcare providers in Berkeley or to cover the costs of such help at home. Please note that, because these funds are taxable, they are available only to US Citizens and Permanent Residents, and foreign visitors with a visa status that allows for compensation, such as a J1. We are deeply grateful to our Family Support Donors for their generosity.

If you are interested in receiving a childcare grant, please fill out this form: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/Z368L3N.

MSRI is unable to offer any on-site childcare services in Berkeley, nor are we able to make recommendations for child care providers. For convenience, participants looking for childcare resources may find the following links useful:

  • Bananas offers free referrals to licensed childcare providers and provides information and resources to families with young children.
  • Berkeley Parents Network is an iconic website where parents can look for and recommend childcare.

MSRI Policies for Program and Workshop Participants

Funding Opportunities: It is the policy of MSRI to actively support a diverse audience at these workshops. Thus, a strong effort is made to remove barriers that hinder equal opportunity, particularly for those groups that have been historically underrepresented in the mathematical sciences. Women, gender-expansive individuals, minorities, mathematicians not located at research centers, recent PhDs, and graduate students are particularly encouraged to apply for funding to attend.

MSRI Collegiality Statement: MSRI is committed to fostering an atmosphere of respect, collegiality, and sensitivity. Please view the complete statement here.

MSRI Anti Discrimination and Harassment Policy: MSRI is committed to providing a welcoming environment free from discrimination on the basis of race, color, creed, religion, sex, national origin, age, physical or mental disability, family care status, veteran status, marital status, sexual orientation, identification or expression. Likewise, the Institute will not tolerate harassment based on these characteristics, or any form of sexual harassment. Please view the complete statement here.


Current all workshops

No Current workshops

Upcoming all workshops

  1. Connections Workshop: Algebraic Cycles, L-Values, and Euler Systems

    Organizers: Henri Darmon (McGill University), Ellen Eischen (University of Oregon), Benjamin Howard (Boston College), LEAD Elena Mantovan (California Institute of Technology)
    Portrait pure
    David Lowry-Duda. Modular form of weight 32 and level 3. For details, see http://davidlowryduda.com/trace-form/

    This will be a hybrid workshop with in-person participation only available to members of the semester-long program and invited guests.  Online participation will be open to all who register.  Due to limited capacity, mathematicians who have not received an official invitation will not be permitted to enter the institute.

    The Connections Workshop features presentations by both leading researchers and promising newcomers whose research has contact with the interrelated topics of algebraic cycles, L-values, and Euler systems. The goal is to present a variety of diverse results, so as to forge new connections, foster collaborative projects, and establish mentoring relationships. While emphasis will be placed on the work of women mathematicians, the workshop is open to all researchers. This workshop is held in honor of mathematician Bernadette Perrin-Riou.

    Updated on Nov 23, 2022 09:22 AM PST
  2. Introductory Workshop: Algebraic Cycles, L-Values, and Euler Systems

    Organizers: Henri Darmon (McGill University), LEAD Ellen Eischen (University of Oregon), Benjamin Howard (Boston College), Elena Mantovan (California Institute of Technology)
    Image
    Image credit: Vincent J. Matsko, 6-adic Koch-like fractal. For details, see http://www.vincematsko.com/Art/ICERM.html

    This will be a hybrid workshop with in-person participation only available to members of the semester-long program and invited guests.  Online participation will be open to all who register.  Due to limited capacity, mathematicians who have not received an official invitation will not be permitted to enter the institute.

    The Introductory Workshop aims to provide a coherent overview of current research in algebraic cycles, L-values, Euler systems, and the many connections between them. This includes the study of special cycles on Shimura varieties and moduli spaces of shtukas, integral representations of L-values and the construction of p-adic L-functions, and the construction of Euler systems from special elements in Chow groups or higher Chow groups of Shimura varieties. Workshop lectures will be organized into short lecture series, so as to allow each series to begin with expository lectures on foundational results before moving on to current research. This workshop is held in honor of mathematician Bernadette Perrin-Riou.

    Updated on Nov 23, 2022 09:24 AM PST
  3. Connections Workshop: Diophantine Geometry

    Organizers: Jennifer Balakrishnan (Boston University), LEAD Yunqing Tang (University of California, Berkeley)

    This will be a hybrid workshop with in-person participation only available to members of the semester-long program and invited guests.  Online participation will be open to all who register.  Due to limited capacity, mathematicians who have not received an official invitation will not be permitted to enter the institute.

    This workshop will highlight talks on various aspects of Diophantine Geometry. The goal of the workshop is to bring together researchers at different career stages and of various backgrounds in order to establish new collaborations and mentoring relationships. Although we will showcase the research of mathematicians who identify as women or gender minorities, this workshop is open to all.

    Updated on Nov 23, 2022 09:24 AM PST
  4. Introductory Workshop: Diophantine Geometry

    Organizers: Hector Pasten (Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile), Yunqing Tang (University of California, Berkeley), LEAD Shou-Wu Zhang (Princeton University)
    Introd image
    Rational points on a general type surface. Image by Hector Pasten.

    This will be a hybrid workshop with in-person participation only available to members of the semester-long program and invited guests.  Online participation will be open to all who register.  Due to limited capacity, mathematicians who have not received an official invitation will not be permitted to enter the institute.

    This workshop will feature expository lectures about  current developments in  Diophantine geometry. This includes  the uniform Mordell—Lang for rational points on curves,  the  Andre—Oort conjecture for special points on Shimura varieties, and effective results via Chabauty method, and related topics in  Arakelov theory, unlikely intersections, arithmetic statistics, arithmetic dynamics, and p-adic Hodge theory.

    Updated on Nov 23, 2022 09:25 AM PST
  5. Shimura Varieties and L-functions

    Organizers: Michael Harris (Columbia University), David Loeffler (University of Warwick), Elena Mantovan (California Institute of Technology), Christopher Skinner (Princeton University), Sarah Zerbes (ETH Zürich), LEAD Wei Zhang (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
    Picture
    Some Gaussian periods for the 29,070-th cyclotomic extension. Image credit: E. Eischen, based on earlier work by W. Duke, S. R. Garcia, T. Hyde, and R. Lutz

    The topical workshop will be dedicated to Shouwu Zhang, to mark the occasion of his 60th birthday, and to honour his numerous beautiful contributions to the theory of Shimura varieties and special values of L-functions. It will highlight cutting edge work on topics such as the construction of Euler systems; relations between special cycles on Shimura varieties and L-functions, such as generalized Gross-Zagier formulas and the Tate conjecture; the construction of Galois representations in cohomology; and related aspects of the theory of automorphic forms.

    Updated on Aug 25, 2021 03:20 PM PDT
  6. Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2023: Mentoring for Equity

    Organizers: Pamela Harris (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee), Abbe Herzig (AHH Consulting), LEAD Aris Winger (Georgia Gwinnett College), Michael Young (Carnegie Mellon University)

    The workshop Critical Issues in Mathematics Education: Mentoring for Equity aims to reach a broad audience of faculty and students in postsecondary mathematical sciences. Participants will learn about the evidence base for effective mentoring, with a focus on culturally responsive mentoring that supports all students and faculty along their mathematical paths. The workshop includes a combination of discussion of research evidence, review and adaptation of practical tools, and explicit training in effective mentoring, including how to bring these tools back to participants’ home institutions. The workshop intertwines objectives of increasing participants’ knowledge of the scholarship on effective mentoring, and engages participants in interactive activities to develop tangible skills as mentors and as mentor-trainers. Participants should come with a growth mindset, prepared to reflect on their experiences as mentors and mentees, and actively contribute to activities that build skills for implementing best mentoring practices.  This workshop will cultivate local and national mentoring communities that bring effective tools and strategies to mentoring, so that mentees can persist and thrive in research, teaching, education, and throughout their education and careers. One focus will be on addressing the individual mentoring needs of all faculty and students, including those who have been historically-marginalized in mathematics education and careers.

    Updated on Nov 18, 2022 02:36 PM PST
  7. Degeneracy of algebraic points

    Organizers: Jennifer Balakrishnan (Boston University), LEAD Mirela Ciperiani (University of Texas, Austin), Philipp Habegger (University of Basel), Wei Ho (Institute for Advanced Study), Hector Pasten (Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile), Yunqing Tang (University of California, Berkeley), Shou-Wu Zhang (Princeton University)
    Image
    A genus 2 curve over the reals and various p-adics. Image created by Prof. Jennifer Balakrishnan .

    In recent years, a number of techniques have led to outstanding progress on Lang-Vojta conjectures, such as the Subspace Theorem, p-adic approaches to finiteness, and modular methods. Similarly, spectacular progress has been achieved on unlikely intersection conjectures thanks to new methods and tools, such as height formulas for special points, connections to model theory, refined counting results, and new theorems of Ax-Shanuel type (bi-algebraic geometry). The goal of this workshop is to create the opportunity for these two groups to interact, to share their techniques, to update on the most recent progress, and to attack the outstanding open questions in the field.

    Updated on Jul 27, 2022 09:28 AM PDT
  8. MIP* = RE and the Connes’ Embedding Problem

    Organizers: Michael Chapman (Hebrew University), Anand Natarajan (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), William Slofstra (University of Waterloo), John Wright (University of Texas, Austin), Henry Yuen (Columbia University)

    This workshop is about the recent MIP*=RE result from quantum computational complexity, and the resulting resolution of the Connes embedding problem from the theory of von Neumann algebras. MIP*=RE connects the disparate areas of computational complexity theory, quantum information, operator algebras, and approximate representation theory. The aim of this workshop is to bridge this divide, by giving an in-depth exposition of the techniques used in the proof of MIP*=RE, and highlighting perspectives on the MIP*=RE result from operator algebras and approximate representation theory. In particular, this workshop will highlight connections with group stability, something that has not been covered in previous workshops. In addition to increasing understanding of the MIP*=RE proof, we hope that this will open up further applications of the ideas behind MIP*=RE in operator algebras.

    Updated on Sep 22, 2022 08:51 AM PDT
  9. Commutative Algebra and its Interaction with Algebraic Geometry (Notre Dame)

    Organizers: Steven Cutkosky (University of Missouri), LEAD Claudia Polini (University of Notre Dame), Claudiu Raicu (University of Notre Dame), Steven Sam (University of California, San Diego), Kevin Tucker (University of Illinois at Chicago)
    1015 image

    Commutative Algebra has seen an extraordinary development in the last few years. Long standing conjectures have been proven and new connections to different areas of mathematics have been built.This summer graduate school will consist of three mini-courses (5 lectures each) on fundamental topics in commutative algebra that are not covered in the standard courses. Each course will be accompanied by problem sessions focused on research. Five general colloquium-style lectures will be given by invited scholars who will also attend the school and help with afternoon research activities. 

    Updated on Sep 26, 2022 12:06 PM PDT
  10. Formalization of Mathematics (SLMath)

    Organizers: Jeremy Avigad (Carnegie Mellon University), Heather Macbeth (Fordham University at Lincoln Center), Patrick Massot (Université Paris-Saclay)
    Image
    Some basic concepts in mathlib and the dependencies between them

    Computational proof assistants now make it possible to develop global, digital mathematical libraries with theorems that are fully checked by computer. This summer school will introduce students to the new technology and the ideas behind it, and will encourage them to think about the goals and benefits of formalized mathematics. Students will learn to use the Lean interactive proof assistant, and by the end of the session they will be in a position to formalize mathematics on their own, join the Lean community, and contribute to its mathematical library.

    Updated on Nov 03, 2022 12:55 PM PDT
  11. MSRI-UP 2023: Topological Data Analysis

    Organizers: Federico Ardila (San Francisco State University), LEAD Maria Mercedes Franco (Queensborough Community College (CUNY)), Rebecca Garcia (Sam Houston State University), Jose Perea (Michigan State University), Candice Price (Smith College), Robin Wilson (California State Polytechnic University, Pomona)

    The MSRI-UP summer program is designed to serve a diverse group of undergraduate students who would like to conduct research in the mathematical sciences.

    In 2023, MSRI-UP will focus on Topological Data Analysis. The research program will be led by Dr. Jose Perea, Associate Professor in the Department of Mathematics and the Khoury College of Computer Sciences at Northeastern University.

    Updated on Nov 15, 2022 05:48 PM PST
  12. Algebraic Methods for Biochemical Reaction Networks (Leipzig, Germany)

    Organizers: Timo de Wolff (TU Berlin), LEAD Alicia Dickenstein (University of Buenos Aires), Elisenda Feliu (University of Copenhagen)
    2021 sgs biochemical reaction networks leipzig image dickenstein.2019.10.09 %281%29
    A basic enzymatic mechanism

    The aim of the course is to learn how tools from algebraic geometry (in particular, from computational and real algebraic geometry) can be used to analyze standard models in molecular biology. Particularly, these models are key ingredients in the development of Systems and Synthetic biology, two active research areas focusing on understanding, modifying, and implementing the design principles of living systems.

    We will focus on the mathematical aspects of the methods, and exemplify and apply the theory to real networks, thereby introducing the participants to relevant problems and mechanisms in molecular biology. As a counterpart, however, the participants will also see how this field has in the past challenged current methods, mainly in the realm of real algebraic geometry, and has given rise to new general and purely theoretical results on polynomial equations. We will end our lectures with an overview of open questions in both fields.

    Updated on Oct 07, 2022 01:49 PM PDT
  13. Séminaire de Mathématiques Supérieures 2023: Periodic and Ergodic Spectral Problems (Montréal, Canada)

    Organizers: Alexander Elgart (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University), Vojkan Jaksic (McGill University), Svetlana Jitomirskaya (University of California, Irvine), Ilya Kachkovskiy (Michigan State University), Jean Lagacé (King's College London), Leonid Parnovski (University College London)

    This two week school will focus on spectral theory of periodic, almost-periodic, and random operators.  The main aim of this school is to teach the students who work in one of these areas, methods used in parallel problems, explain the similarities between all these areas and show them the `big picture'.

    Updated on Nov 03, 2022 01:55 PM PDT
  14. Mathematics and Computer Science of Market and Mechanism Design (SLMath)

    Organizers: Yannai Gonczarowski (Harvard University), Irene Yuan Lo (Stanford University), Ran Shorrer (Pennsylvania State University), LEAD Inbal Talgam-Cohen (Technion---Israel Institute of Technology)

    This school is associated with an upcoming research program at MSRI under the same title. The goal of the school is to equip students unfamiliar with these topics with the mathematical and theoretical computer science toolbox that forms the foundation of market and mechanism design.

    Updated on Nov 03, 2022 11:58 AM PDT
  15. Topics in Geometric Flows and Minimal Surfaces (St. Mary's College)

    Organizers: Ailana Fraser (University of British Columbia), Lan-Hsuan Huang (University of Connecticut), Catherine Searle (Wichita State University), Lu Wang (Yale University)
    Bubble
    Soap bubble: equilibrium solution of the rescaled mean curvature flow and constant curvature surface.

    This graduate summer school will introduce students to two important and inter-related fields of differential geometry: geometric flows and minimal surfaces.

    Geometric flows have had far reaching influences on numerous branches of mathematics and other scientific disciplines. An outstanding example is the completion of Hamilton’s Ricci flow program by Perelman, leading to the resolution of the Poincare conjecture and Thurston’s geometrization conjecture for 3-manifolds. In this part of the summer school, students will be guided through basic topics and ideas in the study of geometric flows.

    Since Penrose used variations of volume to formulate and study black holes in general relativity (in his Nobel prize-winning work), the intriguing connections between minimal surfaces and general relativity have been a strong driving force for the modern developments of both research areas. This part of the summer school will introduce students to the basic theory of minimal submanifolds and its applications in Riemannian geometry and general relativity.

    The curriculum of this program will be accessible and will have a broad appeal to graduate students from a variety of mathematical areas, introducing some of the latest developments in each area and the remaining open problems therein, while simultaneously emphasizing their synergy.

    Updated on Nov 03, 2022 11:58 AM PDT
  16. Machine Learning (UC San Diego)

    Organizers: Ery Arias-Castro (University of California, San Diego), Mikhail Belkin (University of California, San Diego), Yusu Wang (Univ. California, San Diego), Lily Weng (University of California, San Diego)

    The overarching goal of this summer school is to expose the students both to modern forms of unsupervised learning — in the form of geometrical and topological data analysis — and to supervised learning — in the form of (deep) neural networks applied to regression/classification problems. The organizers have opted for a lighter exposure to a broader range of topics. Using the metaphor of a meal, we are offering 2 + 2 samplers — geometry and topology for data analysis + theoretical and practical deep learning — rather than 1 + 1 main dishes. The main goal, thus, is to inspire the students to learn more about one or several of the topics covered in the school.

    The expected learning outcomes for students attending the school are the following:

    1. An introduction to how concepts and tools from geometry and topology can be leveraged to perform data analysis in situations where the data are not labeled.

    2. An introduction to recent and ongoing theoretical and methodological/practical developments in the use of neural networks for data analysis (deep learning).

    Updated on Nov 16, 2022 09:26 AM PST
  17. Introduction to Derived Algebraic Geometry (UC Berkeley)

    Organizers: Benjamin Antieau (Northwestern University), Dmytro Arinkin (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
    Image
    Schur quartic x 4−xy3 = z 4−zu3 and several of the 64 lines that it contains

    Derived algebraic geometry is an ‘update’ of algebraic geometry using ‘derived’ (roughly speaking, homological) techniques. This requires recasting the very foundations of the field: rings have to be replaced by differential graded algebras (or other forms of derived rings), categories by higher categories, and so on. The result is a powerful set of new tools, useful both within algebraic geometry and in related areas. The school serves as an introduction to these techniques, focusing on their applications.

    The school is built around two related courses on geometric (‘derived spaces’) and categorical (‘derived categories’) aspects of the theory. Our goal is to explain the key ideas and concepts, while trying to keep technicalities to a minimum.

    Updated on Nov 03, 2022 11:58 AM PDT
  18. Concentration Inequalities and Localization Techniques in High Dimensional Probability and Geometry (SLMath)

    Organizers: Max Fathi (Université Paris Cité), Dan Mikulincer (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

    The goal of the summer school is for the students to first become familiar with the concept of concentration of measure in different settings (Euclidean, Riemannian and discrete), and the main open problems surrounding it. The students will later become familiar with the proof techniques that involve the different types of localization and obtain expertise on the ways to apply the localization techniques. After attending the graduate school, the students are expected to have the necessary background that would give them a chance to both conduct research around open problems in concentration of measure, find new applications to existing localization techniques and perhaps also develop new localization techniques.

    Updated on Nov 18, 2022 11:05 AM PST
  19. Mathematics of Big Data: Sketching and (Multi-) Linear Algebra (IBM Almaden)

    Organizers: Kenneth Clarkson (IBM Research Division), Lior Horesh (IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center), Misha Kilmer (Tufts University), Tamara Kolda (MathSci.ai), Shashanka Ubaru (IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center)
    Image

    This summer school will introduce graduate students to sketching-based approaches to computational linear and multi-linear algebra. Sketching here refers to a set of techniques for compressing a matrix, to one with fewer rows, or columns, or entries, usually via various kinds of random linear maps. We will discuss matrix computations, tensor algebras, and such sketching techniques, together with their applications and analysis.

    Updated on Nov 03, 2022 11:59 AM PDT
  20. Foundations and Frontiers of Probabilistic Proofs (Zürich, Switzerland)

    Organizers: Alessandro Chiesa (University of California, Berkeley)
    Proofs main logo
    Several executions of a 3-dimensional sumcheck protocol with a random order of directions (thanks to Dev Ojha for creating the diagram)

    Proofs are at the foundations of mathematics. Viewed through the lens of theoretical computer science, verifying the correctness of a mathematical proof is a fundamental computational task. Indeed, the P versus NP problem, which deals precisely with the complexity of proof verification, is one of the most important open problems in all of mathematics.

    The complexity-theoretic study of proof verification has led to exciting reenvisionings of mathematical proofs. For example, probabilistically checkable proofs (PCPs) admit local-to-global structure that allows verifying a proof by reading only a minuscule portion of it. As another example, interactive proofs allow for verification via a conversation between a prover and a verifier, instead of the traditional static sequence of logical statements. The study of such proof systems has drawn upon deep mathematical tools to derive numerous applications to the theory of computation and beyond.

    In recent years, such probabilistic proofs received much attention due to a new motivation, delegation of computation, which is the emphasis of this summer school. This paradigm admits ultra-fast protocols that allow one party to check the correctness of the computation performed by another, untrusted, party. These protocols have even been realized within recently-deployed technology, for example, as part of cryptographic constructions known as succinct non-interactive arguments of knowledge (SNARKs).

    This summer school will provide an introduction to the field of probabilistic proofs and the beautiful mathematics behind it, as well as prepare students for conducting cutting-edge research in this area.

    Updated on Nov 17, 2022 08:59 AM PST
  21. Connections Workshop: Commutative Algebra

    Organizers: Christine Berkesch (University of Minnesota, Twin Cities), Louiza Fouli (New Mexico State University), Maria Evelina Rossi (Università di Genova), LEAD Alexandra Seceleanu (University of Nebraska)
    Noether
    Emmy Noether (1882-1935), a prominent founder of commutative ring theory

    This two-day workshop will feature the work of mathematicians in commutative algebra who identify as women or another marginalized gender. The talks will be appropriate for graduate students, post-docs, and researchers in areas related to the program. This meeting aims to support young researchers. The format will include plenary talks, poster sessions, panel discussions, as well as the opportunity for informal discussions and connections.  The workshop is open to all mathematicians, and members of historically excluded groups and identities are especially encouraged to attend.

    Updated on Nov 04, 2022 04:05 PM PDT
  22. Introductory Workshop: Commutative Algebra

    Organizers: Srikanth Iyengar (University of Utah), Claudia Miller (Syracuse University), Claudia Polini (University of Notre Dame), LEAD Anurag Singh (University of Utah)
    Msri 1053 image
    Fractal behavior of local cohomology. For details, see arXiv:2210.03656 by Gao and Raicu

    The Introductory Workshop will feature lecture series devoted to some recent breakthrough results in commutative algebra, and to new developments in core areas of the field.  It will also highlight links to other areas such as arithmetic geometry, representation theory, noncommutative geometry, and singularity theory.

    Updated on Oct 31, 2022 04:02 PM PDT
  23. Recent Developments in Commutative Algebra

    Organizers: Daniel Erman (University of Wisconsin-Madison), Linquan Ma (Purdue University), LEAD Karl Schwede (University of Utah), Karen Smith (University of Michigan), Andrew Snowden (University of Michigan), Irena Swanson (Purdue University)

    Many long-standing conjectures in commutative algebra have been solved in recent years, often through the introduction of new methods that are quickly becoming central to the field.  This workshop will bring together a wide array of researchers in commutative algebra and related fields, with the goal of forging new connections among topics, and with a particular emphasis on transformative new methods.

    Created on Jul 27, 2022 02:01 PM PDT
  24. Advances in Lie Theory, Representation Theory and Combinatorics: Inspired by the work of Georgia M. Benkart

    Organizers: Hélène Barcelo (MSRI - Mathematical Sciences Research Institute), Ellen Kirkman (Wake Forest University), Gail Letzter (University of Maryland), Daniel Nakano (University of Georgia), Arun Ram (University of Melbourne)
    Image

    This workshop will have a view to the future of a broad spectrum of topics including
        * structure and classification of finite dimensional Lie algebras and superalgebras in characteristic p
        * structure of infinite dimensional Lie algebras and their representations
        * deformation theory of algebras, double constructions and elemental Lie algebras
        * diagram algebras and combinatorial representation theory
        * algebraic combinatorics of groups of Lie type:characters, Schur-Weyl duality, Bratteli diagrams, and McKay correspondences
        * quantum groups and crystal bases, particularly for superalgebras and affine algebras
        * examples of fusion categories arising from representations of Drinfeld doubles and other algebras
        * cohomology for finite tensor categories with applications to its underlying geometry

    This meeting will feature principal contributors in these areas in a celebration of the work of Georgia Benkart.  With the same focus and tenacity that Georgia always had, we will strive to provide a conference full of beautiful mathematics, incredible inspiration, and the warmth of Georgia’s welcoming personality to our field and our community.

    Updated on Nov 07, 2022 10:30 AM PST

Past all workshops

  1. Workshop [HYBRID WORKSHOP] Floer Homotopical Methods in Low Dimensional and Symplectic Topology

    Organizers: LEAD Mohammed Abouzaid (Columbia University), Andrew Blumberg (Columbia University), Jennifer Hom (Georgia Institute of Technology), Emmy Murphy (Northwestern University), Sucharit Sarkar (University of California, Los Angeles)
    Image

    This will be a hybrid workshop with in-person participation only available to members of the semester-long program and invited guests.  Online participation will be open to all who register.  Due to limited capacity, mathematicians who have not received an official invitation will not be permitted to enter the institute.

    The workshop will focus on the interaction between homotopy theory and symplectic topology and low dimensional topology that is mediated by Floer theory. Among the topics covered are foundational questions, applications to concrete geometric questions, and the relationship with finite dimensional approaches.

    Updated on Nov 23, 2022 09:29 AM PST
  2. Workshop Modern Math Workshop 2022

    Organizers: Hélène Barcelo (MSRI - Mathematical Sciences Research Institute), Philip Hammer (Institute for Mathematical and Statistical Innovation), Christian Ratsch (University of California, Los Angeles; Institute of Pure and Applied Mathematics (IPAM)), Ulrica Wilson (Morehouse College; Institute for Computational and Experimental Research in Mathematics (ICERM))

    ALL FUNDING FOR THIS WORKSHOP HAS BEEN ALLOCATED

    As part of the Mathematical Sciences Collaborative Diversity Initiatives, the six NSF-funded U.S. mathematics institutes will host their annual SACNAS pre-conference event, the 2022 Modern Math Workshop (MMW). The Modern Math Workshop encourages undergraduates from underrepresented groups to pursue careers in the mathematical sciences, and builds research and networking opportunities among undergraduates, graduate students and recent PhDs.

    Updated on Nov 21, 2022 03:50 PM PST
  3. Workshop [HYBRID WORKSHOP] New Four-Dimensional Gauge Theories

    Organizers: Andriy Haydys (Université Libre de Bruxelles), Lotte Hollands (Heriot-Watt University, Riccarton Campus), LEAD Eleny-Nicoleta Ionel (Stanford University), Richard Thomas (Imperial College, London), Thomas Walpuski (Humboldt-Universität)
    Msri pic crop
    Image drawn by Dr. Lotte Hollands

    This will be a hybrid workshop with in-person participation only available to members of the semester-long program and invited guests.  Online participation will be open to all who register.  Due to limited capacity, mathematicians who have not received an official invitation will not be permitted to enter the institute.

    This workshop will bring together researchers working on new four-dimensional gauge theories from the perspectives of differential geometry, algebraic geometry, and physics. Over the last 25 years, physicists have made tantalizing conjectures relating the Vafa–Witten equation to modular forms and the Kapustin–Witten and Haydys–Witten equations to knot theory and the geometric Langlands programme. The analytical challenges in the way of establishing these predictions are now being pursued vigorously.  More recently, algebraic geometers have had enormous success in confirming and refining Vafa–Witten's predictions for projective surfaces. The workshop will serve as a platform for reporting on recent progress and exchanging ideas in all of these areas, with the aim of strengthening existing and fostering new interactions.

    Updated on Nov 01, 2022 09:11 AM PDT
  4. Workshop [HYBRID WORKSHOP] Introductory Workshop: Floer Homotopy Theory

    Organizers: Sheel Ganatra (University of Southern California), Tyler Lawson (University of Minnesota Twin Cities), LEAD Robert Lipshitz (University of Oregon), Nathalie Wahl (University of Copenhagen)
    Image
    A Fleur Homotopy.

    This will be a hybrid workshop with in-person participation by members of the semester-long program and speakers. Online participation will be open to all who register. 

    Over the last decade, there has been a wealth of new applications of homotopy-theoretic techniques to Floer homology in low-dimensional topology and symplectic geometry, including Manolescu’s disproof of the high-dimensional Triangulation Conjecture and Abouzaid-Blumberg’s proof of the Arnol’d Conjecture in finite characteristic. Conversely, results in Floer theory and categorification have opened new directions of research in homotopy theory, from string topology to S-Lie algebras. The goal of this workshop is to introduce researchers in Floer theory to modern techniques and questions in homotopy theory and, conversely, introduce researchers in homotopy theory to ideas underlying Floer theory and its applications.

    Updated on Sep 15, 2022 10:52 AM PDT
  5. Workshop [HYBRID WORKSHOP] Connections Workshop: Floer Homotopy Theory

    Organizers: Teena Gerhardt (Michigan State University), LEAD Kristen Hendricks (Rutgers University), Ailsa Keating (University of Cambridge)
    Connectionsimage
    An illustration of a generic Heegaard quadruple by K. Hendricks, J. Hom, M. Stoffregen, and I. Zemke

    This will be a hybrid workshop with in-person participation by members of the semester-long program, speakers and a limited number of invited participants. Online participation will be open to all who register. 

    This workshop will feature talks by experts in Floer theory (and its applications to low-dimensional topology) and homotopy theory. It will include two expository lectures aimed at graduate students and other researchers who are new to the field, as well as a sequence of research talks and a contributed talks session. There will also be a panel discussion focusing on professional development. The majority of the speakers and panelists for this event will be women and gender minorities, and members of these groups and of other underrepresented groups are especially encouraged to attend. This workshop is open to all mathematicians.

    Updated on Sep 15, 2022 08:32 AM PDT
  6. Workshop [HYBRID WORKSHOP] Introductory Workshop: Analytic and Geometric Aspects of Gauge Theory

    Organizers: LEAD Aleksander Doan (Trinity College; University College London), Lorenzo Foscolo (University College London), Laura Fredrickson (University of Oregon), Ruxandra Moraru (University of Waterloo), Michael Singer (University College London)
    Image
    Portion of a letter from Maxwell to Tait dated December 4, 1867 computing the linking number of two curves

    This will be a hybrid workshop with in-person participation by members of the semester-long program and speakers. Online participation will be open to all who register. 

    The workshop will highlight the utility and impact of gauge theory in other areas of math. Mini-courses will cover the historical utility and impact of gauge theory in areas including low-dimensional topology, algebraic geometry, and the analysis of PDE; additional talks will cover more recent directions.

    Updated on Sep 01, 2022 11:06 AM PDT
  7. Workshop [HYBRID WORKSHOP] Connections Workshop: Analytic and Geometric Aspects of Gauge Theory

    Organizers: Lara Anderson (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University), LEAD Laura Schaposnik (University of Illinois at Chicago)
    Schaposnik 2019 higgs fig2
    The nilpotent cone in red over the 0, and the points A, B and C, lying over the C*-fow and of the Hitchin section respectively.

    This will be a hybrid workshop with in-person participation by members of the semester-long program, speakers and a limited number of invited participants. Online participation will be open to all who register. 

    This two-day workshop will consist of various talks given by prominent female mathematicians on topics of analytic and geometric aspects of gauge theory. These will be appropriate for graduate students, post-docs, and researchers in areas related to the program.  The meeting aims to support young researchers working in analytic and geometric aspects of gauge theory by   facilitating mentoring from senior colleagues and helping towards the development of crucial professional skills. The format will include mentoring pairings, panel discussions, and Q&A sessions as well as the opportunity for informal discussions and connections.

    Updated on Sep 01, 2022 11:02 AM PDT
  8. Summer Graduate School Sums of Squares Method in Geometry, Combinatorics and Optimization (BIRS)

    Organizers: LEAD Grigoriy Blekherman (Georgia Institute of Technology), Annie Raymond (University of Massachusetts Amherst), Cynthia Vinzant (University of Washington)
    Image
    Graph of the Motzkin polynomial, which is nonnegative but not a sum of squares.

    The study of nonnegative polynomials and sums of squares is a classical area of real algebraic geometry dating back to Hilbert’s 17th problem. It also has rich connections to real analysis via duality and moment problems. In the last 15 years, sums of squares relaxations have found a wide array of applications from very applied areas (e.g., robotics, computer vision, and machine learning) to theoretical applications (e.g., extremal combinatorics, theoretical computer science). Also, an intimate connection between sums of squares and classical algebraic geometry has been found. Work in this area requires a blend of ideas and techniques from algebraic geometry, convex geometry and representation theory. After an introduction to nonnegative polynomials, sums of squares and semidefinite optimization, we will focus on the following three topics:

    • Sums of squares on real varieties (sets defined by real polynomial equations) and connections with classical algebraic geometry.
    • Sums of squares method for proving graph density inequalities in extremal combinatorics. Here addition and multiplication take place in the gluing algebra of partially labelled graphs.
    • Sums of squares relaxations for convex hulls of real varieties and theta-bodies with applications in optimization.

    The summer school will give a self-contained introduction aimed at beginning graduate students, and introduce participants to the latest developments. In addition to attending the lectures, students will meet in intensive problem and discussion sessions that will explore and extend the topics developed in the lectures.

    Updated on Apr 07, 2022 02:41 PM PDT
  9. Summer Graduate School Tropical Geometry

    Organizers: Renzo Cavalieri (Colorado State University), Hannah Markwig (Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen), Dhruv Ranganathan (University of Cambridge)
    Image
    A tropical stable map and the corresponding floor diagram

    Enumerative geometry and the theory of moduli spaces of curves are two cornerstones of modern algebraic geometry; the two subjects have had a significant influence on each other. In the last 15 years, discrete and combinatorial methods, systematized within tropical geometry, have begun to provide new avenues of access into these two subjects. The goal of this summer school is to give students crash courses in tropical and logarithmic geometry, with a particular focus on the applications in enumerative geometry and moduli theory.  The school will consist of three courses of seven lectures each:

    1. Enumeration of tropical curves/ by Hannah Markwig
    2. Curve counting in tropical and algebraic geometry by Renzo Cavalieri
    3. Logarithmic geometry and stable map/s by Dhruv Ranganathan

    Updated on Aug 12, 2022 03:03 PM PDT
  10. Summer Graduate School Mathematics of Machine Learning (INdAM and Courant Institute)

    Organizers: Sebastien Bubeck (Microsoft Research)
    Image
    Popular visualization of the MNIST dataset

    This school is offered in partnership with Istituto Nazionale di Alta Matematica (INdAM) and the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences.

    Learning theory is a rich field at the intersection of statistics, probability, computer science, and optimization. Over the last decades the statistical learning approach has been successfully applied to many problems of great interest, such as bioinformatics, computer vision, speech processing, robotics, and information retrieval. These impressive successes relied crucially on the mathematical foundation of statistical learning.

    Recently, deep neural networks have demonstrated stunning empirical results across many applications like vision, natural language processing, and reinforcement learning. The field is now booming with new mathematical problems, and in particular, the challenge of providing theoretical foundations for deep learning techniques is still largely open. On the other hand, learning theory already has a rich history, with many beautiful connections to various areas of mathematics (e.g., probability theory, high dimensional geometry, game theory). The purpose of the summer school is to introduce graduate students (and advanced undergraduates) to these foundational results, as well as to expose them to the new and exciting modern challenges that arise in deep learning and reinforcement learning.

    Updated on Aug 12, 2022 11:42 AM PDT
  11. Summer Graduate School Topological Methods for the Discrete Mathematician

    Organizers: Pavle Blagojevic (Freie Universität Berlin), Florian Frick (Carnegie Mellon University), Shira Zerbib (Iowa State University)
    Image

    Recently, progress in the field of topological methods in discrete mathematics has been rapid and has generated a lot of activity with the resolution of major open problems, the emergence of new lines of inquiry, and the development of new tools. These exciting new developments have not been digested into a textbook treatment. The two main goals of this school are to:

    1. Provide graduate students with a thorough introduction to novel topological techniques and to a handful of their applications in the fields of combinatorics and discrete geometry with short glimpses into mathematical mechanics and algorithm complexity.
    2. Expose students to current research, and guide them in research on open problems in discrete mathematics using modern topological tools.

    The summer school will lead participants from appealing, simple-to-state problems at confluence of combinatorics, geometry, and topology to sophisticated topological methods that are required for their resolution. In recent years topological methods have found numerous novel applications in mathematics and beyond, such as in data science, machine learning, economics, the social sciences, and biology.  The problems we will discuss are particularly well-suited to rapidly put students in a position to approach related research questions.

    Updated on Aug 12, 2022 11:34 AM PDT
  12. Summer Graduate School MSRI-NCTS Joint Summer School: Recent Topics in Well Posedness

    Organizers: Jungkai Chen (National Taiwan University), Mimi Dai (University of Illinois at Chicago), Yoshikazu Giga (University of Tokyo), Tsuyoshi Yoneda (Hitotsubashi University)
    Image
    Fluid-flow stream function color-coded by vorticity in 3D flat torus calculated by K. Nakai (The University of Tokyo)

    This school is offered in partnership with the National Center for Theoretical Sciences.

    The purpose of the workshop is to introduce graduate students to fundamental results on the Navier-Stokes and the Euler equations, with special emphasis on the solvability of its initial value problem with rough initial data as well as the large time behavior of a solution. These topics have long research history. However, recent studies clarify the problems from a broad point of view, not only from analysis but also from detailed studies of orbit of the flow.

    Updated on Aug 12, 2022 11:40 AM PDT
  13. Summer Graduate School 2022 Joint PCMI School: Number Theory Informed by Computation

    Organizers: Jennifer Balakrishnan (Boston University), Rafe Mazzeo (Stanford University), Bjorn Poonen (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Akshay Venkatesh (Institute for Advanced Study)

    The PCMI graduate summer school program in 2022 will consist of a sequence of 11 minicourses. The lecturers and topics for these minicourses are listed below. Each minicourse is accompanied by a problem session. The topics are arranged so that there is good material and opportunities for learning both for less experienced students as well as more advanced students. Beyond their attendance in these minicourse sessions, all graduate participants will be able to take part in the substantial other benefits of a PCMI session. This includes the opportunity to interact with the researchers in residence and take part in the research seminar component of PCMI. Many graduate students also interact in significant ways with the undergraduate cohort,,the undergraduate faculty cohort, and may also participate in the many pedagogically focused activities which form part of the K-12 Teacher Leadership Program and the Workshop for Equity in Mathematics Education. PCMI includes numerous cross-program activities to help members from all these groups interact with one another.

    Updated on Feb 02, 2022 03:52 PM PST
  14. Summer Graduate School Metric Geometry and Geometric Analysis (Oxford, United Kingdom)

    Organizers: LEAD Cornelia Drutu (University of Oxford), Panos Papazoglou (University of Oxford)
    Cornelia picture 2
    Several geometric ideas in the context of a surface: hyperbolic metric, CAT(0) inequality, Gromov hyperbolicity/coarse median geometry, nonpositively-curved square tiling, Besikovitch inequality. (Picture by M. Hagen and A. Sisto.)

    The purpose of the summer school is to introduce graduate students to key mainstream directions in the recent development of geometry, which sprang from Riemannian Geometry in an attempt to use its methods in various contexts of non-smooth geometry. This concerns recent developments in metric generalizations of the theory of nonpositively curved spaces and discretizations of methods in geometry, geometric measure theory and global analysis. The metric geometry perspective gave rise to new results and problems in Riemannian Geometry as well.

    All these themes are intertwined and have developed either together or greatly influencing one another. The summer school will introduce some of the latest developments and the remaining open problems in these very modern areas, and will emphasize their synergy.

     

    Updated on Feb 14, 2022 12:29 PM PST
  15. Summer Graduate School Séminaire de Mathématiques Supérieures 2022: Floer Homotopy Theory

    Organizers: Kristen Hendricks (Rutgers University), Ailsa Keating (University of Cambridge), Robert Lipshitz (University of Oregon), Liam Watson (University of British Columbia), Ben Williams (University of British Columbia)
    Image
    Image by Prof. Robert Lipshitz

    The idea of stable homotopy refinements of Floer homology was first introduced by Cohen, Jones, and Segal in a 1994 paper, but it was only in the last decade that this idea became a key tool in low-dimensional and symplectic topology. The two crowning achievements of these techniques so far are Manolescu's use of his Pin(2)-equivariant Seiberg--Witten Floer homotopy type to resolve the Triangulation Conjecture and Abouzaid-Blumberg's use of Floer homotopy theory and Morava K-theory to prove the general Arnol'd Conjecture in finite characteristic. During this period, a range of related techniques, included under the umbrella of Floer homotopy theory, have also led to important advances, including involutive Heegaard Floer homology, Smith theory for Lagrangian intersections, homotopy coherence, and further connections between string topology and Floer theory. These in turn have sparked developments in algebraic topology, ranging from developments on Lie algebras in derived algebraic geometry to new computations of equivariant Mahowald invariants to new results on topological Hochschild homology.
     
    The goal of the summer school is to provide participants the tools in symplectic geometry and stable homotopy theory required to work on Floer homotopy theory. Students will come away with a basic understanding of some of the key techniques, questions, and challenges in both of these fields. The summer school may be particularly valuable for participants with a solid understanding of one of the two fields who want to learn more about the other and the connections between them.

    Updated on May 27, 2022 09:41 AM PDT
  16. Summer Graduate School Random Graphs

    Organizers: Louigi Addario-Berry (McGill University), Remco van der Hofstad (Technische Universiteit Eindhoven)
    2020 sgs random graphs proposal hofsatd.2018.12
    by DeDelphin Sénizergues

    The topic of random graphs is at the forefront of applied probability, and it is one of the central topics in multidisciplinary science where mathematical ideas are used to model and understand the real world. At the same time, random graphs pose challenging mathematical problems that have attracted the attention from probabilists and combinatorialists since the 1960, with the pioneering work of Erdös and Rényi. Around the turn of the millennium, very large data sets started to become available, and several applied disciplines started to realize that many real-world networks, even though they are from various different origins, share many fascinating features. In particular, many of such networks are small worlds, meaning that graph distances in them are typically quite small, and they are scalefree, in the sense that there are enormous differences in the number of connections that their elements make. In particular, such networks are quite different from the classical random graph models, such as proposed by Erdös and Rényi.

    Updated on Jul 14, 2022 09:37 AM PDT
  17. Summer Graduate School Algebraic Theory of Differential and Difference Equations, Model Theory and their Applications

    Organizers: LEAD Alexey Ovchinnikov (Queens College, CUNY), Anand Pillay (University of Notre Dame), Thomas Scanlon (University of California, Berkeley)
    Image
    Algebraic Theory Of Differential And Difference Equations, Model Theory And Their Applications

    The purpose of the summer school will be to introduce graduate students to effective methods in algebraic theories of differential and difference equations with emphasis on their model-theoretic foundations and to demonstrate recent applications of these techniques to studying dynamic models arising in sciences. While these topics comprise a coherent and rich subject, they appear in graduate coursework in at best a piecemeal way, and then only as components of classes for other aims. With this Summer Graduate School, students will learn both the theoretical basis of differential and difference algebra and how to use these methods to solve practical problems. Beyond the lectures, the graduate students will meet daily in problem sessions and will participate in one-on-one mentoring sessions with the lecturers and organizers.

    Updated on Jul 22, 2022 09:57 AM PDT
  18. Summer Graduate School New Directions in Representation Theory (AMSI and U. of Hawaii, Hilo)

    Organizers: Angela Coughlin (Australian Mathematical Sciences Institute), Joseph Grotowski (University of Queensland), Tim Marchant (Australian Mathematical Sciences Institute), Ole Warnaar (University of Queensland), Geordie Williamson (University of Sydney)

    This school is offered in partnership with the Australian Mathematical Sciences Institute and the University of Hawaii, Hilo.

    Representation Theory has undergone a revolution in recent years, with the development of what is now known as higher representation theory. In particular, the notion of categorification has led to the resolution of many problems previously considered to be intractable.

    The school will begin by providing students with a brief but thorough introduction to what could be termed the “bread and butter of modern representation theory”, i.e., compact Lie groups and their representation theory; character theory; structure theory of algebraic groups.

    We will then continue on to a number of more specialized topics. The final mix will depend on discussions with the prospective lecturers, but we envisage such topics as:

    • modular representation theory of finite groups (blocks, defect groups, Broué’s conjecture);

    • perverse sheaves and the geometric Satake correspondence;

    • the representation theory of real Lie groups.

    Updated on Aug 12, 2022 11:38 AM PDT
  19. Summer Graduate School Geometric Flows (Crete, Greece)

    Organizers: Nicholas Alikakos (National and Kapodistrian University of Athens (University of Athens)), Panagiota Daskalopoulos (Columbia University)
    Image
    photo courtesy of Panagiota Daskalopoulos

    [The image on this vase from Minoan Crete, dated on 1500-2000 BC, resembles an ancient solution to the Curve shortening flow - one of the most basic geometric flows. The vase is at Heraklion Archaeological Museum]

    This summer graduate school is a collaboration between MSRI and the FORTH-IACM Institute in Crete. The purpose of the school is to introduce graduate students to some of the most important geometric evolution equations. Information about the location of the summer school can be found here.

    This is an area of geometric analysis that lies at the interface of differential geometry and partial differential equations. The lectures will begin with an introduction to nonlinear diffusion equations and continue with classical results on the Ricci Flow, the  Mean curvature flow and other fully non-linear extrinsic flows such as the Gauss curvature flow. The lectures will also include geometric applications such as isoperimetric inequalities, topological applications such as the Poincaré onjecture, as well as recent important developments related to the study of singularities and ancient solutions.

    Updated on Sep 30, 2022 12:18 PM PDT
  20. MSRI-UP MSRI-UP 2022: Algebraic Methods in Mathematical Biology

    Organizers: LEAD Federico Ardila (San Francisco State University), Duane Cooper (Morehouse College), Maria Mercedes Franco (Queensborough Community College (CUNY)), Rebecca Garcia (Sam Houston State University), Candice Price (Smith College), Anne Shiu (Texas A & M University; Texas A&M University)

    The MSRI-UP summer program is designed to serve a diverse group of undergraduate students who would like to conduct research in the mathematical sciences.

    In 2022, MSRI-UP will focus on Algebraic Methods in Mathematical Biology. The research program will be led by Dr. Anne Shiu, Associate Professor of Mathematics at Texas A&M University.

    Updated on May 31, 2022 02:30 PM PDT
  21. Summer Graduate School Integral Equations and Applications

    Organizers: Fioralba Cakoni (Rutgers University), Dorina Mitrea (Baylor University), Irina Mitrea (Temple University), Shari Moskow (Drexel University)
    Image
    L 2 Spectra of K for apertures π 15 , · · · 14π 15 , π

    The field of Integral Equations has a long and distinguished history, being the driving force behind many fundamental developments in various areas of mathematics including Harmonic Analysis, Partial Differential Equations, Potential Theory, Scattering Theory, Functional Analysis, Complex Analysis, Operator Theory, Mathematical Physics and Numerical Analysis.

    This school will:

    1. introduce graduate students to the systematic study of integral equations;
    2. present some of the latest theoretical advancements in the field and open problems; and
    3. involve participants in a hands-on discovery lab focused on deriving results about integral operators in two dimensions relevant for both the theoretical and numerical treatment of Integral Equations in two dimensions. The curriculum of this program will be accessible and will have a broad appeal to graduate students from a variety of mathematical areas (both theoretical and applied).

    Updated on Aug 11, 2022 09:23 AM PDT
  22. Workshop May 12, a Celebration for Women in Mathematics, year 2022

    Organizers: Ini Adinya (University of Ibadan), Maria-Grazia ASCENZI (University of California Los Angeles), Hajer Bahouri (Laboratoire Jacques-Louis Lions; Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS)), Hélène Barcelo (MSRI - Mathematical Sciences Research Institute), Lenore Blum (Carnegie Mellon University), Donatella Danielli (Arizona State University), Shanna Dobson (University of California, Riverside), Malena Espanol (Arizona State University), Vasiliki Evdoridou (The Open University), Olubunmi Fadipe-Joseph (University of Ilorin), Anna Fino (Università di Torino), Adi Glucksam (Northwestern University), Eriko Hironaka (Florida State University), M.E. Hogan (Texas Tech University), Kyounghee Kim (Florida State University), Kuei-Nuan Lin (Pennsylvania State University), Liangbing Luo (University of Connecticut), LEAD Ornella Mattei (San Francisco State University), Betul Orcan-Ekmekci (Rice University), Leticia Pardo Simon (University of Manchester), Julia Plavnik (Indiana University), Palina Salanevich (Universiteit Utrecht), Awais Shaukat (Government College University Lahore), Tara Taylor (St. Francis Xavier University)

    MSRI's 2022 Celebration of Women in Math event will be for graduate students, with a focus on "How to build a Career in Math".  It will be a hybrid workshop, with online and in-person activities at satellite institutions.

    The event will include a panel discussion, social activities, and breakout sessions on the following topics:

    • Finding (having) mentors
    • How to build a network and collaborations
    • How to become an independent researcher
    • How to balance teaching/research/admin/life

    Registration is open. 

    Updated on May 26, 2022 02:41 PM PDT
  23. Workshop Adventurous Berkeley Complex Dynamics

    Organizers: Mikhail Lyubich (State University of New York, Stony Brook), LEAD Jasmin Raissy (Institut de Mathématiques de Bordeaux), LEAD Roland Roeder (Indiana University--Purdue University), Dierk Schleicher (Université d'Aix-Marseille (AMU))
    Image
    Image by Scott Kaschner

    This workshop will focus on complex dynamics in one and several variables. We will bring toghether experts in rational dynamics, transcendental dynamics, and dynamics in several complex variables in order to get new perspective and foster discussions in a warm and stimulating atmosphere. A special focus will be put on the interactions between one dimensional and higher dimensional complex dynamics, and on connections with adjacent areas of mathematics.

    Updated on May 05, 2022 11:17 AM PDT
  24. Workshop The Analysis and Geometry of Random Spaces

    Organizers: Nikolai Makarov (California Institute of Technology), LEAD Steffen Rohde (University of Washington), Eero Saksman (University of Helsinki), Amanda Turner (University of Lancaster), Fredrik Viklund (Royal Institute of Technology), Jang-Mei Wu (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)
    Image3
    Image by Prof. Amanda Turner

    The aim of this workshop is to bring together researchers whose work contributes to the study of random structures that exhibit some form of conformal self-similarity. Notable examples include the Schramm-Loewner evolution SLE, the Brownian map and random trees, Liouville Quantum Gravity, and Conformal Field Theory. A particular focus will be the discussion of analytic tools needed to address the challenges arising from the often rough underlying sets and spaces.

    Updated on Apr 08, 2022 01:06 PM PDT
  25. Workshop [Virtual] Hot Topics: Regularity Theory for Minimal Surfaces and Mean Curvature Flow

    Organizers: Christine Breiner (Brown University), Otis Chodosh (Stanford University), Luca Spolaor (University of California, San Diego), Lu Wang (Yale University)
    Adriaen hanneman two boys blowing bubbles

    This workshop will explore connections between the regularity theory of minimal surfaces and of mean curvature flow. Recent breakthroughs have improved our understanding of singularity formation in both settings but the current research trends are becoming increasingly disparate. Experts from both areas will present their research and there will be ample free time to establish connections between the topics.

    Updated on Mar 23, 2022 04:41 PM PDT
  26. Workshop [Hybrid Workshop] Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2022: Initiating, Sustaining, and Researching Mathematics Department Transformation of Introductory Courses for STEM Majors

    Organizers: Naneh Apkarian (Arizona State University), David Bressoud (Macalester College), Pamela Burdman (Just Equations), Jamylle Carter (Diablo Valley college), Ted Coe (Northwest Evaluation Association), Courtney Ginsberg (Math for America), Estrella Johnson (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University), W Gary Martin (Auburn University), Michael O'Sullivan (San Diego State University), LEAD Chris Rasmussen (San Diego State University), Daniel Reinholz (San Diego State University), Wendy Smith (University of Nebraska), David Webb (University of Colorado at Boulder)

    The world is changing, along with perceptions. Many call for the improvement of mathematics teaching and learning, for both citizenry and STEM preparation. To achieve sustainable change, though, the focus needs to extend from individuals to systems. It is not enough to change one classroom or one course. Transformation requires change at all levels: in teaching, programmatic practices, and institutions. This workshop will bring together teachers and researchers from universities, community colleges, and K-12 schools to explore the reasons for and processes by which change in university mathematics departments is initiated, promoted, and sustained and lessons learned from change efforts in K-12. It will review what we know about change at all levels and reflect on stories of failure and success.

    Updated on Mar 14, 2022 12:02 PM PDT
  27. Workshop [Virtual] Hot Topics: Foundations of Stable, Generalizable and Transferable Statistical Learning

    Organizers: LEAD Peter Bühlmann (ETH Zurich), John Duchi (Stanford University), Elizabeth Tipton (Northwestern University), Bin Yu (University of California, Berkeley)
    Image
    When data automatically drop from the sky: intelligent approaches in data science change the way humans and computers interact. (Illustration: Niklas Briner)

    Despite the remarkable success in extracting information from complex and (often) large-scale datasets over the last two decades, further progress is needed to making automated statistical and machine learning algorithms more reliable, robust, interpretable and trustworthy. This workshop has its focus on foundational aspects of this goal, linking areas at the interface between statistics, optimization, machine learning and computer science, such as distributional robustness and stability, adversarial and transfer learning, generalizability and meta analysis, and causality.

    Updated on Mar 15, 2022 10:01 AM PDT
  28. Workshop [HYBRID WORKSHOP] Introductory Workshop: Complex Dynamics - from special families to natural generalizations in one and several variables

    Organizers: Anna Miriam Benini (Università di Parma), Fabrizio Bianchi (Université de Lille), Mikhail Hlushchanka (Universiteit Utrecht), LEAD Dylan Thurston (Indiana University)
    Parameterspacechiarotagliato
    Parameter space for the family $e^z+c$

    This will be a hybrid workshop with in-person participation by members of the semester-long program. Online participation will be open to all who register. 

    This workshop is built around four minicourses that will introduce the participants to a range of recent techniques in various areas of holomorphic dynamics, given by specialists in these topics. The event is complemented by a series of talks by leaders in the field, aimed at a large audience and presenting current research directions in the area.

    Updated on Mar 01, 2022 11:28 AM PST
  29. Workshop [HYBRID WORKSHOP] Connections Workshop: Complex Dynamics - from special families to natural generalizations in one and several variables

    Organizers: Núria Fagella (University of Barcelona), LEAD Tanya Firsova (Kansas State University), Thomas Gauthier (Université Paris-Saclay), Sarah Koch (University of Michigan)
    Image

    This will be a hybrid workshop with in-person participation by members of the semester-long program. Online participation will be open to all who register. 

    This workshop will feature lectures on a variety of topics in complex dynamics, given by prominent researchers in the field, as well as presentations by younger participants. It precedes the introductory workshop and will preview the major research themes of the semester program. There will be a panel discussion focusing on issues particularly relevant to junior researchers, women, and minorities, as well as other social events. This workshop is open to all mathematicians.

    Updated on Mar 01, 2022 11:28 AM PST
  30. Workshop [HYBRID WORKSHOP] Introductory Workshop: The Analysis and Geometry of Random Spaces

    Organizers: LEAD Mario Bonk (University of California, Los Angeles), Joan Lind (University of Tennessee), Steffen Rohde (University of Washington), Fredrik Viklund (Royal Institute of Technology)
    Isingcriticalboundary
    Interface for the critical Ising model, approaching an SLE curve in the scaling limit (image by Dr. Malin P. Forsström)

    This will be a hybrid workshop with in-person participation by members of the semester-long program. Online participation will be open to all who register. 

    This workshop will introduce some of the major themes in probability and geometric analysis that will be relevant for the semester-long program. A series of short mini-courses will give participants the opportunity to learn about important subjects such as the Schramm-Loewner evolution (SLE) or the Gaussian free field (GFF), for example. The workshop will also include "visionary" lectures by prominent researchers who will outline fruitful directions for future research.

    Updated on Mar 01, 2022 11:34 AM PST
There are more then 30 past workshops. Please go to Past workshops to see all past workshops.