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Upcoming Programs

  1. Universality and Integrability in Random Matrix Theory and Interacting Particle Systems

    Organizers: LEAD Ivan Corwin (Columbia University), Percy Deift (New York University, Courant Institute), Ioana Dumitriu (University of California, San Diego), Alice Guionnet (École Normale Supérieure de Lyon), Alexander Its (Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis), Herbert Spohn (Technische Universität München), Horng-Tzer Yau (Harvard University)
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    The past decade has seen tremendous progress in understanding the behavior of large random matrices and interacting particle systems. Complementary methods have emerged to prove universality of these behaviors, as well as to probe their precise nature using integrable, or exactly solvable models. This program seeks to reinforce and expand the fruitful interaction at the interface of these areas, as well as to showcase some of the important developments and applications of the past decade.

    Updated on Apr 20, 2020 11:12 AM PDT
  2. Complementary Program 2021-22

    The Complementary Program has a limited number of memberships that are open to mathematicians whose interests are not closely related to the core programs; special consideration is given to mathematicians who are partners of an invited member of a core program.

    Updated on Jan 15, 2021 11:53 AM PST
  3. The Analysis and Geometry of Random Spaces

    Organizers: LEAD Mario Bonk (University of California, Los Angeles), Joan Lind (University of Tennessee), Steffen Rohde (University of Washington), Eero Saksman (University of Helsinki), Fredrik Viklund (Royal Institute of Technology), Jang-Mei Wu (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)
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    This program is devoted to the investigation of universal analytic and geometric objects that arise from natural probabilistic constructions, often motivated by models in mathematical physics. Prominent examples for recent developments are the Schramm-Loewner evolution, the continuum random tree, Bernoulli percolation on the integers,  random surfaces produced by Liouville Quantum Gravity, and Jordan curves and dendrites obtained from random conformal weldings and laminations. The lack of regularity of these random structures often results in a failure of classical methods of analysis. One goal of this program is to enrich the analytic toolbox to better handle these rough structures.

    Updated on Nov 20, 2019 02:12 PM PST
  4. Complex Dynamics: from special families to natural generalizations in one and several variables

    Organizers: LEAD Sarah Koch (University of Michigan), Jasmin Raissy (Institut de Mathématiques de Toulouse), Dierk Schleicher (Université d'Aix-Marseille (AMU)), Mitsuhiro Shishikura (Kyoto University), Dylan Thurston (Indiana University)
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    The mating of these two dendritic Julia sets is equal to the Julia set of a rational map of degree 2; that Julia set is equal to the entire Riemann sphere. Picture by Arnaud Chéritat

    Holomorphic dynamics is a vibrant field of mathematics that has seen profound progress over the past 40 years. It has numerous interconnections to other fields of mathematics and beyond. 

    Our semester will focus on three selected classes of dynamical systems: rational maps (postcritically finite and beyond); transcendental maps; and maps in several complex variables. We will put particular emphasis on the interactions between each these, and on connections with adjacent areas of mathematics. 

    Updated on Nov 20, 2019 02:12 PM PST
  5. Floer Homotopy Theory

    Organizers: Mohammed Abouzaid (Columbia University), Andrew Blumberg (University of Texas, Austin), Kristen Hendricks (Rutgers University), Robert Lipshitz (University of Oregon), LEAD Ciprian Manolescu (Stanford University), Nathalie Wahl (University of Copenhagen)
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    Illustrated by Nathalie Wahl

    The development of Floer theory in its early years can be seen as a parallel to the emergence of algebraic topology in the first half of the 20th century, going from counting invariants to homology groups, and beyond that to the construction of algebraic structures on these homology groups and their underlying chain complexes.  In continuing work that started in the latter part of the 20th century, algebraic topologists and homotopy theorists have developed deep methods for refining these constructions, motivated in large part by the application of understanding the classification of manifolds. The goal of this program is to relate these developments to Floer theory with the dual aims of (i) making progress in understanding symplectic and low-dimensional topology, and (ii) providing a new set of geometrically motivated questions in homotopy theory. 

    Updated on Oct 02, 2020 03:01 PM PDT
  6. Analytic and Geometric Aspects of Gauge Theory

    Organizers: Laura Fredrickson (University of Oregon), Rafe Mazzeo (Stanford University), Tomasz Mrowka (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Laura Schaposnik (University of Illinois at Chicago), LEAD Thomas Walpuski (Humboldt-Universität)
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    The mathematics and physics around gauge theory have, since their first interaction in the mid 1970’s, prompted tremendous developments in both mathematics and physics.  Deep and fundamental tools in partial differential equations have been developed to provide rigorous foundations for the mathematical study of gauge theories.  This led to ongoing revolutions in the understanding of manifolds of dimensions 3 and 4 and presaged the development of symplectic topology.  Ideas from quantum field theory have provided deep insights into new directions and conjectures on the structure of gauge theories and suggested many potential applications.  The focus of this program will be those parts of gauge theory which hold promise for new applications to geometry and topology and require development of new analytic tools for their study.

    Updated on Oct 28, 2020 09:12 AM PDT
  7. Algebraic Cycles, L-Values, and Euler Systems

    Organizers: Henri Darmon (McGill University), Ellen Eischen (University of Oregon), LEAD Benjamin Howard (Boston College), David Loeffler (University of Warwick), Christopher Skinner (Princeton University), Sarah Zerbes (University College London), Wei Zhang (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
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    Some Gaussian periods for the 255,255-th cyclotomic extension. Image credit: E. Eischen, based on earlier work by W. Duke, S. R. Garcia, T. Hyde, and R. Lutz

    The fundamental conjecture of Birch and Swinnerton-Dyer relating the Mordell–Weil ranks of elliptic curves to their L-functions is one of the most important and motivating problems in number theory. It resides at the heart of a collection of important conjectures (due especially to Deligne, Beilinson, Bloch and Kato) that connect values of L-functions and their leading terms to cycles and Galois cohomology groups. 

    The study of special algebraic cycles on Shimura varieties has led to progress in our understanding of these conjectures. The arithmetic intersection numbers and the p-adic regulators of special cycles are directly related to the values and derivatives of L-functions, as shown in the pioneering theorem of Gross-Zagier and its p-adic avatars for Heegner points on modular curves. The cohomology classes of special cycles (and related constructions such as Eisenstein classes) form the foundation of the theory of Euler systems, providing one of the most powerful methods known to prove vanishing or finiteness results for Selmer groups of Galois representations. 

    The goal of this semester is to bring together researchers working on different aspects of this young but fast-developing subject, and to make progress on understanding the mysterious relations between L-functions, Euler systems, and algebraic cycles.

    Updated on Feb 25, 2020 11:41 AM PST
  8. Diophantine Geometry

    Organizers: Jennifer Balakrishnan (Boston University), Mirela Ciperiani (University of Texas, Austin), Philipp Habegger (University of Basel), Wei Ho (University of Michigan), LEAD Hector Pasten (Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile), Yunqing Tang (Université Paris-Sud), Shou-Wu Zhang (Princeton University)

    Our knowledge about rational and algebraic solutions of diophantine equations has dramatically improved in aspects such as height formulas and height bounds for algebraic points, automorphic methods, unlikely intersection problems, and non-abelian and p-adic approaches to algebraic degeneracy of rational points. All these groundbreaking advances will be the central theme of the semester program “Diophantine Geometry” at MSRI. The main purpose of this program is to bring together experts as well as enthusiastic young researchers to learn from each other, to initiate and continue collaborations, to update on recent breakthroughs, and to further advance the field by making progress on fundamental open problems and by developing further connections with other branches of mathematics. We trust that younger mathematicians will greatly contribute to the success of the program with their new ideas. It is our hope that this program will provide a unique opportunity for women and underrepresented groups to make outstanding contributions to the field, and we strongly encourage their participation.

    Updated on Feb 19, 2021 10:24 AM PST