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Mathematical Sciences Research Institute

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  1. Program Summer Research 2016

    Come spend time at MSRI in the summer! The Institute’s summer graduate schools and undergraduate program fill the lecture halls and some of the offices, but we have room for a modest number of visitors to come to do research singly or in small groups, while enjoying the excellent mathematical facilities, the great cultural opportunities of Berkeley, San Francisco and the Bay area, the gorgeous natural surroundings, and the cool weather.

    We can provide offices, library facilities and bus passes—unfortunately not financial support. Though the auditoria are largely occupied, there are blackboards and ends of halls, so 2-6 people could comfortably collaborate with one another. We especially encourage such groups to apply together.

    To make visits productive, we require at least a two-week commitment.  We strive for a wide mix of people, being sure to give special consideration to women, under-represented groups, and researchers from non-research universities.  

    Updated on Mar 22, 2016 11:58 AM PDT
  2. Summer Graduate School Electronic Structure Theory

    Organizers: LEAD Lin Lin (University of California, Berkeley), Jianfeng Lu (Duke University), James Sethian (University of California, Berkeley)

    Ab initio or first principle electronic structure theories, particularly represented by Kohn-Sham density functional theory (KS-DFT), have been developed into workhorse tools with a wide range of scientific applications in chemistry, physics, materials science, biology etc. What is needed are new techniques that greatly extend the applicability and versatility of these approaches. At the core, many of the challenges that need to be addressed are essentially mathematical. The purpose of the workshop is to provide graduate students a self-contained introduction to electronic structure theory, with particular emphasis on frontier topics in aspects of applied analysis and numerical methods. 

    Updated on Jul 27, 2016 04:16 PM PDT
  3. Summer Graduate School Chip Firing and Tropical Curves

    Organizers: LEAD Matthew Baker (Georgia Institute of Technology), David Jensen (University of Kentucky), Sam Payne (Yale University)

    Tropical geometry uses a combination of techniques from algebraic geometry, combinatorics, and convex polyhedral geometry to study degenerations of algebraic varieties; the simplest tropical objects are tropical curves, which one can think of as "shadows" of algebraic curves.  Linear equivalence of divisors on an abstract tropical curve is determined by a simple but rich combinatorial process called "chip firing", which was discovered independently in the discrete setting by physicists and graph theorists.  From a pedagogical point of view, one can view tropical curves as a combinatorial model for the highly analogous but more abstract theory of algebraic curves, but there is in fact much more to the story than this: one can use tropical curves and chip firing to prove theorems in algebraic geometry and number theory.  This field is relatively new, so participants will have the opportunity to start from scratch and still get a glimpse of the cutting edge in this active research area.

    Updated on Feb 11, 2016 02:10 PM PST