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Workshops related to Programs which fall into one of the following three categories.

Introductory Workshop: The idea of these workshops is to set the stage and provide the context for the program, with the intended audience being researchers not in the program.  This would include members in the other programs, members of the local mathematical community, and participants from outside the area selected especially for the workshop, particularly from groups underrepresented in research intensive contexts:  women, minorities, mathematicians not located at research centers, and graduate students.  In selecting participants, priority is given to these latter groups.  When done well, these introductory workshops have been effective in broadcasting the goals, ideas and techniques of a particular program to the mathematical public at large, as well as in bringing the MSRI community together as a whole.

Connections for Women: This is a two-day workshop held immediately preceding the week of the Introductory Workshop. While different programs have approached these workshops in diverse ways, one of the principal objectives, strongly supported by the SAC and HRAC, is to provide an enhanced opportunity for female researchers to interact with other women with similar research interests. There is considerable flexibility for the organization of this two-day event, but MSRI does require good coordination between the Connections and Introductory workshop organizers so that as many female researchers as possible are supported to stay on for the Introductory Workshop.. It is therefore customary to have one person be simultaneously on the organizing committees for both of these workshops. As is the case for all MSRI workshops, registration to attend Connections workshop lectures is open to all interested persons.

Topical Workshop: Also directed toward the mathematical community at large, these workshops are designed to interest and attract young researchers and other mathematicians active in the field.


MSRI provides a yearly workshop called Hot Topics, to showcase what's new, innovative and interesting to the mathematical sciences community at the present time.

The MSRI-UP summer program is designed for undergraduate students who have completed two years of university-level mathematics courses and would like to conduct research in the mathematical sciences. Due to funding restrictions, only U.S. citizens and permanent residents are eligible to apply and the program cannot accept foreign students regardless of funding.



  1. Introductory Workshop: New Geometric Methods in Number Theory and Automorphic Forms

    Organizers: Laurent Berger (École Normale Supérieure de Lyon), Ariane Mézard (L'Institut de Mathématiques de Jussieu), LEAD Akshay Venkatesh (Stanford University), Shou-Wu Zhang (Princeton University)

    The goal of this workshop is to give a practical introduction to some of the main topics and techniques related to the August-December 2014 MSRI program, "New geometric methods in number theory and automorphic forms."   The workshop is aimed at graduate students and interested researchers in number theory or related fields.  

    There will be  lecture series on periods of automorphic forms, Shimura varieties, and representations of p-adic groups,as well as more advanced topics, including p-adic Hodge theory and the cohomology of arithmetic groups.  

    Updated on Jun 09, 2014 09:38 AM PDT
  1. Connections for Women: Geometric Representation Theory

    Organizers: LEAD Monica Vazirani (University of California, Davis), Eva Viehmann (TU München)

    Within the broad range of geometric representation theory the Connections Workshop will focus on three research topics in which we expect particularly striking new developments within the next few years:
    * Categorical and geometric structures in representation theory and Lie superalgebras
    * Geometric construction of representations via Shimura varieties and related moduli spaces
    * Hall algebras and representations

    The workshop will bring together researchers from these different topics within geometric representation theory and will thus facilitate a successful start of the semester program. It will give junior researchers from each of these parts of geometric representation theory a broader picture of possible applications and of new developments, and will establish a closer contact between junior and senior researchers.
    This workshop is aimed at encouraging and increasing the active participation of women and members of under-represented groups in the MSRI program.

    Updated on Jul 21, 2014 09:55 AM PDT
  2. Introductory Workshop: Geometric Representation Theory

    Organizers: David Ben-Zvi (University of Texas), Kevin McGerty (University of Oxford)

    Geometric Representation Theory is a very active field, at the center of recent advances in Number Theory and Theoretical Physics. The principal goal of the Introductory Workshop will be to provide a gateway for graduate students and new post-docs to the rich and exciting, but potentially daunting, world of geometric representation theory. The aim is to explore some of the fundamental tools and ideas needed to work in the subject, helping build a cohort of young researchers versed in the geometric and physical sides of the Langlands philosophy.

    Updated on Jun 09, 2014 09:38 AM PDT
  3. Breaking the Neural Code

    Organizers: Larry Abbott (Columbia University), Ingrid Daubechies (Duke University), Michael Jordan (University of California), LEAD Liam Paninski (Columbia University)

    For decades, neuroscientists have dreamed about the possibility of recording from all the neurons in a brain, or of having access to a complete large brain wiring diagram, or ideally to obtain both of these datasets simultaneously, in the same brain.  Recent technical advances have brought this dream close to reality in some cases.  Now the challenge will be to understand these massive datasets.  A few domains will be particularly relevant:

    • Inferring network structure from noisy and incomplete data
    • Inferring computational input-output function from structure
    • Optimal experimental design (incl. compressive sensing methods) for observation of networks
    • Modeling structured stochastic network dynamics
    • Optimal control of network dynamics
    • Inferring low-dimensional dynamics from high-dimensional observations

    There’s a strong need in neuroscience for deep new ideas from mathematics and statistics, and our hope is that this small, focused workshop without many formal talks will spark collaborations that will lead to breakthroughs in the areas described above.

    This workshop is by invitation only.

    Updated on Jul 15, 2014 02:06 PM PDT
  4. Categorical Structures in Harmonic Analysis

    Organizers: Thomas Haines (University of Maryland), Florian Herzig (University of Toronto), LEAD David Nadler (University of California, Berkeley)

    The workshop will focus on the role of categorical structures in number theory and harmonic analysis, with an emphasis on the setting of the Langlands program. Celebrated examples of this theme range from Lusztig's character sheaves to Ngo's proof of the Fundamental Lemma. The workshop will be a forum for researchers from a diverse collection of fields to compare problems and strategies for solutions.

    Updated on Jun 09, 2014 09:38 AM PDT
  5. Automorphic forms, Shimura varieties, Galois representations and L-functions

    Organizers: LEAD Pierre Colmez (L'Institut de Mathématiques de Jussieu), Stephen Kudla (University of Toronto), Elena Mantovan (California Institute of Technology), Ariane Mézard (L'Institut de Mathématiques de Jussieu), Richard Taylor (Institute for Advanced Study)

    L-functions attached to Galois representations coming from algebraic geometry contain subtle arithmetic information (conjectures of Birch and Swinnerton-Dyer, Deligne, Beilinson, Bloch and Kato, Fontaine and Perrin-Riou). Langlands has predicted the existence of a correspondence relating these L-functions to L-functions of automorphic forms which are much better understood. The workshop will focus on recent developments related to Langlands correspondence (construction of Galois representations attached to automorphic forms via the cohomology of Shimura varieties, modularity of Galois representations...) and arithmetic of special values of L-functions.

    It will be dedicated to Michael Harris as a tribute to his enormous influence on the themes of the workshop.

    Updated on Jun 09, 2014 09:39 AM PDT
  6. Connections for Women: Dynamics on Moduli Spaces of Geometric Structures

    Organizers: Virginie Charette (University of Sherbrooke), LEAD Fanny Kassel (Université de Lille I (Sciences et Techniques de Lille Flandres Artois)), Karin Melnick (University of Maryland), Anna Wienhard (Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg)

    This two-day workshop will consist of various talks given by prominent female mathematicians in the field.  These will be appropriate for graduate students, post-docs, and researchers in areas related to the program.  The workshop will also include a professional development session.

    Updated on Jun 09, 2014 09:39 AM PDT
  7. Introductory Workshop: Dynamics on Moduli Spaces of Geometric Structures

    Organizers: Richard Canary (University of Michigan), LEAD William Goldman (University of Maryland), Ursula Hamenstaedt (Universität Bonn), Alessandra Iozzi (ETH Zurich)

    The deformation theory of geometric structures on manifolds  is a subfield of differential geometry and topology, with a heavy infusion of Lie theory. Its richness stems from close relations to dynamical systems, algebraic geometry, representation theory, Lie theory, partial differential equations, number theory, and complex analysis.

    The introductory workshop will serve  as an overview to the  program.   It aims to familiarize graduate students, post-docs, and other researchers to the major topics of the program. There will be a number of short courses.

    Updated on Jul 28, 2014 08:41 AM PDT
  8. Connections for Women: Geometric and Arithmetic Aspects of Homogeneous Dynamics

    Organizers: Elon Lindenstrauss (Hebrew University), Hee Oh (Yale University)

    This workshop will consist of several mini-courses given by prominent female mathematicians in the field, intended for graduate students, post-docs, and researchers in areas related to the program. The workshop will also include an informal panel discussion session among female researchers on career issues.

    Updated on Jun 30, 2014 09:19 AM PDT
  9. Introductory Workshop: Geometric and Arithmetic Aspects of Homogeneous Dynamics

    Organizers: Manfred Einsiedler (Eidgenössische TH Zürich-Hönggerberg), LEAD Jean-François Quint (University de Bordeaux 1), Barbara Schapira (Université de Picardie (Jules Verne))

    This Introductory Workshop will consist of several introductory lectures and series of lectures on the recent trends in the field, given by experts in the domain. In addition, there will be several shorter talks by young researchers.

    Updated on Aug 15, 2014 04:13 PM PDT
  10. Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2015: Developmental Mathematics: For whom? Toward what ends?

    Organizers: Duane Cooper (Morehouse College), Mark Hoover (University of Michigan), LEAD Robert Megginson (University of Michigan), Richard Sgarlotti (Hannahville Indian School), Katherine Stevenson (California State University, Northridge)

    This workshop will address the critical issue of developmental mathematics at two- and four-year colleges and universities and the broader dynamic of mathematics remediation that occurs at all levels. It will engage mathematicians, K-12 teachers, mathematics educators, and administrators in a conversation about the goals of developmental mathematics and the contributions that our different professional communities make to this work. Key questions that will be addressed are:

    1. How do we teach content in ways that acknowledge and leverage each student's prior learning experiences? In particular, how do we take advantage of a student's maturity while refining his or her learning habits where necessary?

    2. How can developmental mathematics instruction move students through mathematics which must be relearned while simultaneously gaining momentum on more advanced mathematics (including the development of mathematical practices needed for meaningful mathematical work)?

    3. What are strategies for supporting the needs of the wide range of students in developmental mathematics programs--those developing mathematical skills for life in general as well as those developing the foundation necessary to proceed towards a STEM major?  How can we successfully address equity issues raised for students from groups underrepresented in STEM fields? How can developmental mathematics instruction blend synchronous and asynchronous instruction to achieve maximal efficiency and impact?

    4. What is the proper balance between addressing the needs of the wide range of students mentioned in the preceding point and keeping instruction and course offerings concise?

    5. What are the characteristics, training, and practices of a successful developmental mathematics teacher?

    6. What support services enhance the success of a developmental mathematics program?

    Updated on Aug 04, 2014 12:58 PM PDT
  11. Dynamics on Moduli Spaces

    Organizers: Markus Burger (ETH Zurich), David Dumas (University of Illinois at Chicago), Olivier Guichard (Université de Strasbourg I (Louis Pasteur)), François Labourie (Université Paris-Sud (Orsay)), Anna Wienhard (Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg)

    The Research Workshop of the ``Dynamics on moduli spaces of geometric structures'' will concentrate on some of the following general interrelated themes:

    (1) Geometric structures on the spaces of geometric structures which extend and generalize classical constructions on Teichmüller spaces, such as the Weil-Petersoon metric, the pressure metric, the Teichmüller metric and its geodesic flow, Fenchel-Nielsen coordinates, Fock-Goncharov Thurson-Penner coordinates, and the symplectic and Poisson  geometries

    (2) Relations with harmonic maps, Riemann surfaces, complex geometry:  specifically Higgs  bundles, holomorphic differentials (quadratic, cubic, etc.) as parameters  for representations  of the fundamental group, hyperkähler and complex symplectic geometry of  moduli spaces,   lifts of Teichmüller geodesic flows to flat bundles of character varieties

    (3) Asymptotic properties of higher Teichmüller spaces, including generalized measured geodesic laminations, Culler-Morgan-Shalen asymptotics of character varieties, degenerations of geometric structures and discrete subgroups

    (4) Actions of mapping class groups and outer automorphism groups,  properness criteria for Anosov representations and their generalizations,  properness criteria for non-discrete representations, chaotic actions of  mapping class groups and the monodromy map from structures to  representations

    (5) Classification of exotic geometric structures, tameness criteria, generalizations of ending lamination-type invariants to higher rank structures, rigidity and flexibility for thin subgroups, arithmeticity conditions, and geometric transitions

    Updated on Jan 21, 2014 08:15 PM PST
  12. Advances in Homogeneous Dynamics

    Organizers: LEAD Dmitry Kleinbock (Brandeis University), Hee Oh (Yale University), Alireza Salehi Golsefidy (University of California, San Diego), Ralf Spatzier (University of Michigan)

    The Advances in Homogeneous Dynamics workshop will feature the speakers whose work is at the forefront of the eld. There will be a panel discussion accompanied by an open problem session to lay out possible directions for the research in homogeneous dynamics. Talks will be in a broad range of topics and this will help to build more connections between researchers interested in dynamical systems, number theory and geometry. For example we hope that the involvement of the participants of the other program held at MSRI during the same academic year (Dynamics on Moduli Spaces of Geometric Structures, Spring 2015) would create new connections between the topics. There will be shorter talks presented by early-career researchers

    Updated on Jan 21, 2014 08:54 PM PST
  13. Connections for Women: Differential Geometry

    Organizers: Christine Breiner (Fordham University), LEAD Natasa Sesum (Rutgers University)

    The purpose of this meeting is to help junior female researchers to become familiar with the focus topics of the main MSRI program, and also for the junior researchers to have an opportunity to get acquainted with more senior women researchers in differential geometry.

    Updated on Mar 10, 2014 08:35 AM PDT
  14. Introductory Workshop: Modern Riemannian Geometry

    Organizers: LEAD Tobias Colding (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), John Lott (University of California, Berkeley), Jeff Viaclovsky (University of Wisconsin)

    The week will be devoted to an introduction to modern techniques in Riemannian geometry. This is intended to help graduate students and younger researchers get a headstart, in order to increase their participation during the main semester programs and research lectures. To increase outreach, the week will focus on Riemannian geometry and should be largely accessible. Some minicourses on topics of recent interest will be included. The workshop will also have semi-expository lectures dealing with aspects of spaces with curvature bounded from below, since such spaces will occur throughout the semester. We expect that many Berkeley mathematicians and students will participate in the introductory workshop.

    Updated on Aug 14, 2014 08:49 AM PDT
  15. Kähler Geometry, Einstein Metrics, and Generalizations

    Organizers: Simon Donaldson (Imperial College, London), Gang Tian (Princeton University), Jeff Viaclovsky (University of Wisconsin)

    The workshop will integrate elements from complex differential geometry with Einstein metrics and their generalizations. The topics will include

    - Existence of Kähler-Einstein metrics and extremal Kähler metrics. Notions of stability in algebraic geometry such as Chow stability, K-stability, b-stability, and polytope stability. Kähler-Einstein metrics with conical singularities along a divisor.

    - Calabi-Yau metrics and collapsed limit spaces. Connections with physics and mirror symmetry.

    - Einstein metrics and their moduli spaces, ε-regularity, noncompact examples such as ALE, ALF, and Poincaré-Einstein metrics. Generalizations of the Einstein condition, such as Bach-flat metrics and Ricci solitons.

    - Sasaki-Einstein metrics and metrics with special holonomy. New examples and classification problems.

    Updated on Aug 03, 2013 09:30 AM PDT
  16. Geometric Flows in Riemannian and Complex Geometry

    Organizers: Tobias Colding (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), LEAD John Lott (University of California, Berkeley), Natasa Sesum (Rutgers University)

    The workshop will concentrate on parabolic methods in both Riemannian and complex geometry. The topics will include

    - Ricci flow. Analytic questions about Ricci flow in three dimensions. Possible applications of Ricci flow to 4-manifold topology. Ricci flow in higher dimensions under curvature assumptions.

    - Kähler-Ricci Flow. Applications to the Kähler-Einstein problem. Connections to the minimal model program. Study of Kähler-Ricci solitons and limits of Kähler-Ricci flow.

    - Mean curvature flow. Singularity analysis. Generic mean curvature flow.

    - Other geometric flows such as Calabi flow and pluriclosed flow.

    Updated on Jun 07, 2013 10:39 AM PDT

Past all workshops

workshop
  1. Workshop Connections for Women: New Geometric Methods in Number Theory and Automorphic Forms

    Organizers: Wenching Li (Pennsylvania State University), LEAD Elena Mantovan (California Institute of Technology), Sophie Morel (Princeton University), Ramdorai Sujatha (University of British Columbia)

    This 2-day workshop will showcase the contributions of female mathematicians to the three main themes of the associated MSRI program: Shimura varieties, p-adic automorphic forms, periods and L-functions. It will bring together women who are working in these areas in all stages of their careers, featuring lectures by both established leaders and emerging researchers. In addition, there will be a poster session open to all participants and an informal panel discussion on career issues.

    Updated on Aug 14, 2014 10:00 AM PDT
  2. Summer Graduate School Geometry and Analysis

    Organizers: Hans-Joachim Hein (Imperial College, London), LEAD Aaron Naber (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

    Geometric and complex analysis is the application of tools from analysis to study questions from geometry and topology. This two week summer course will provide graduate students with the necessary background to begin studies in the area. The first week will consist of introductory courses on geometric analysis, complex analysis, and Riemann surfaces. The second week will consist of more advanced courses on the regularity theory of Einstein manifolds, Kahler-Einstein manifolds, and the analysis of Riemann surfaces.

    Updated on Aug 11, 2014 12:16 PM PDT
  3. Summer Graduate School Stochastic Partial Differential Equations

    Organizers: Yuri Bakhtin (New York University, Courant Institute), LEAD Ivan Corwin (Columbia University), James Nolen (Duke University)

    Stochastic Partial Differential Equations (SPDEs) serve as fundamental models of physical systems subject to random inputs, interactions or environments. It is a particular challenge to develop tools to construct solutions, prove robustness of approximation schemes, and study properties like ergodicity and fluctuation statistics for a wide variety of SPDEs. 

    The purpose of this two week workshop is to educate graduate students on the state-of-the-art methods and results in SPDEs. The three courses which will be run simultaneously will highlight different (though related) aspects of this area including (1) Fluctuation theory of PDEs with random coefficients (2) Ergodic theory of SPDEs and (3) Exact solvability of SPDEs

    Updated on Jun 24, 2014 02:31 PM PDT
  4. Summer Graduate School Algebraic Topology

    Organizers: LEAD Jose Cantarero-Lopez (Centro de Investigación en Matemáticas), LEAD Michael Hill (University of Virginia)

    Modern algebraic topology is a broad and vibrant field which has seen recent progress on classical problems as well as exciting new interactions with applied mathematics. This summer school will consist of a series of lecture by experts on major research directions, including several lectures on applied algebraic topology. Participants will also have the opportunity to have guided interaction with the seminal texts in the field, reading and speaking about the foundational papers.

    Updated on Jun 26, 2014 08:51 AM PDT
  5. Summer Graduate School IAS/PCMI 2014: Mathematics and Materials

    Organizers: Mark Bowick (Syracuse University), David Kinderlehrer (Carnegie Mellon University), Govind Menon (Brown University), Charles Radin (University of Texas)

    The program in 2014 will bring together a diverse group of mathematicians and scientists with interests in fundamental questions in mathematics and the behavior of materials. The meeting addresses several themes including computational investigations of material properties, the emergence of long- range order in materials and self-assembly, the geometry of soft condensed matter and the calculus of variations, phase transitions and statistical mechanics. The program will cover several topics in discrete and differential geometry that are motivated by questions in materials science. Many central topics, such as the geometry of packings, problems in the calculus of variations and phase transitions, will be discussed from the complementary points of view of mathematicians and physicists.

    Updated on Mar 06, 2014 12:12 PM PST
  6. MSRI-UP MSRI-UP 2014: Arithmetic Aspects of Elementary Functions

    Organizers: Duane Cooper (Morehouse College), Ricardo Cortez (Tulane University), LEAD Herbert Medina (Loyola Marymount University), Ivelisse M. Rubio (University of Puerto Rico), Suzanne Weekes (Worcester Polytechnic Institute)

    The MSRI-UP summer program is designed for undergraduate students who have completed two years of university-level mathematics courses and would like to conduct research in the mathematical sciences. Due to funding restrictions, only U.S. citizens and permanent residents are eligible to apply and the program cannot accept foreign students regardless of funding. The academic portion of the 2014 program will be led by Dr. Victor Moll from Tulane University.

    Updated on Jan 07, 2014 01:54 PM PST
  7. Summer Graduate School Dispersive Partial Differential Equations

    Organizers: Natasa Pavlovic (University of Texas), Nikolaos Tzirakis (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

    The purpose of the workshop is to introduce graduate students to the recent developments in the area of dispersive partial differential equations (PDE).

    Dispersive equations have received a great deal of attention from mathematicians because of their applications to nonlinear optics, water wave theory and plasma physics. We will outline the basic tools of the theory that were developed with the help of multi-linear Harmonic Analysis techniques. The exposition will be as self-contained as possible.

    Updated on Jun 16, 2014 10:14 AM PDT
  8. Workshop Model Theory in Geometry and Arithmetic

    Organizers: Raf Cluckers (Université de Lille I (Sciences et Techniques de Lille Flandres Artois)), LEAD Jonathan Pila (University of Oxford), Thomas Scanlon (University of California, Berkeley)

    The workshop will feature talks in a range of topics where model theory interacts with other parts of mathematics, especially number theory and arithmetic geometry, including: motivic integration, algebraic dynamics, diophantine geometry, and valued fields.

    Updated on May 27, 2014 01:57 PM PDT
  9. Workshop Reimagining the Foundations of Algebraic Topology

    Organizers: Vigleik Angeltveit (Australian National University), Mark Behrens (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Julie Bergner (University of California), LEAD Andrew Blumberg (University of Texas)

    Recent innovations in higher category theory have unlocked the potential to reimagine the basic tools and constructions in algebraic topology. This workshop will explore the interplay between these higher and $\infty$-categorical techniques with classical algebraic topology, playing each off of the other and returning the field to conceptual, geometrical intuition.

    Updated on Apr 15, 2014 11:30 AM PDT
  10. Workshop Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2014: The role of the mathematics department in the mathematical preparation of teachers

    Organizers: Deborah Ball (University of Michigan), Solomon Friedberg (Boston College), LEAD Jim Lewis (University of Nebraska), Despina Stylianou (City College, CUNY), Peter Trapa (University of Utah), Hung-Hsi Wu (University of California, Berkeley), Darryl Yong (Harvey Mudd College)

    The 2014 CIME workshop will focus on the role played by mathematics departments in preparing future teachers.  As part of this focus, the workshop will consider two broad questions: What mathematics should teachers know, and how should they come to know this mathematics?

    The Conference Board of the Mathematical Sciences publication, The Mathematical Education of Teachers II, recommends that, at institutions that prepare teachers, teacher education should be “an important part of a mathematics department’s mission” (p.19). Certainly, at some universities, mathematicians are significantly involved in the mathematical experiences of students who are planning become teachers. But there are many other departments where this is not true. Future mathematics teachers are enrolled in the department’s mathematics classes, but no one is attending to the fact that this is where they are developing mathematical knowledge and (from watching their instructors) ideas about how teach mathematics.  This role – whether deliberate or latent –– is vitally important for the mathematical preparation of beginning teachers.  

    The CIME workshop has three core aims: (A) to acquaint mathematicians with basic facts about teacher education and how teacher education intersects with the math department even when no one is taking special note of the department’s role; (B) to explore a set of key questions and best practices central to taking advantage of the role that mathematics departments do – or could – play in the mathematical preparation of teachers:

    1. What is known about effective mathematical preparation of teachers, including curriculum, instructional approaches, and assessments?  
    2. What supports do mathematicians and mathematics departments need to carry out this important role effectively?  What are examples of successful models and what evidence exists about their effects?  
    3. What are some of the persistent problems or challenges and what are promising examples of addressing these? 

    and (C) to identify possible action steps to provide more collective capacity for math departments to contribute to teachers’ mathematical education.

     

    Updated on Apr 04, 2014 09:25 AM PDT
  11. Workshop Hot Topics: Perfectoid Spaces and their Applications

    Organizers: Sophie Morel (Princeton University), Peter Scholze (Universität Bonn), LEAD Richard Taylor (Institute for Advanced Study), Jared Weinstein (Boston University)

    Since their introduction just two years ago, perfectoid spaces have played a crucial role in a number of striking advances in arithmetic algebraic geometry: the proof of Deligne's weight-monodromy conjecture for complete intersections in toric varieties; the development of p-adic Hodge theory for rigid analytic spaces;  a p-adic analogue of Riemann's classification of abelian varieties over the complex numbers; and the construction of Galois representations for torsion classes in the cohomology of many locally symmetric spaces (for instance arithmetic hyperbolic 3-manifolds). We will start the week with an exposition of the foundations of the theory of perfectoid spaces, with the aim of teaching novices to work with them. Then we will discuss their current and potential applications.

    Updated on Mar 04, 2014 01:42 PM PST
  12. Workshop Connections for Women: Model Theory and Its Interactions with Number Theory and Arithmetic Geometry

    Organizers: Kirsten Eisentraeger (Pennsylvania State University), Julia Gordon (University of British Columbia), Deirdre Haskell (McMaster University)

    The development of model theory has always been influenced by its potential applications.
    Recent years have seen a remarkable flowering of that development, with many exciting applications of model theory in number theory and algebraic geometry. The introductory workshop will aim to increase these interactions by exposing the techniques of model theory to the number theorists and algebraic geometers, and the problems of number theory and algebraic geometry to the model theorists. The Connections for Women workshop will focus on presenting current research on the borders of these subjects, with particular emphasis on the contributions of women. In addition, there will be some social occasions to allow young women and men to make connections with established researchers, and a panel discussion addressing the challenges faced by all young researchers, but especially by women, in establishing a career in mathematics.

    Updated on Feb 12, 2014 09:59 AM PST
  13. Workshop Pacific Northwest and Bay Area Differential Geometry Seminar (BADGS) Winter 2014

    Organizers: David Bao (San Francisco State University), Joel Hass (University of California, Davis), Rafe Mazzeo (Stanford University), Richard Montgomery (University of California, Santa Cruz), david hoffman (Stanford University)

    The seminar will take place from 10AM to 5PM on Saturday, and 9:15AM to 1PM on Sunday. Participants and their significant others are invited to a dinner to be arranged at a local restaurant on Saturday evening. The cost of the dinner will be reduced for students and postdocs. There is a signup link on the interactive program.

    Location:  Stanford University Department of Mathematics, Room 380C

    INTERACTIVE PROGRAM (PDF)

    Updated on Jan 16, 2014 04:46 PM PST
  14. Workshop Introductory Workshop: Model Theory, Arithmetic Geometry and Number Theory

    Organizers: Elisabeth Bouscaren (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS)), Antoine Chambert-Loir (Université Paris-Sud (Orsay)), LEAD Rahim Moosa (University of Waterloo)

    Model theory is a branch of mathematical logic whose structural techniques have proven to be remarkably useful in arithmetic geometry and number theory. We will introduce in this workshop some of the main themes of the program.

    In particular, we will be offering the following tutorials:
    1. An Introduction to Stability-Theoretic Techniques, by Pierre Simon.
    2. Model Theory and Diophantine Geometry, by Antoine Chambert-Loir, Ya'acov Peterzil, and  Anand Pillay.
    3. Valued Fields and Berkovich Spaces, by Deirdre Haskell and Martin Hils.
    4. Model Theory and Additive Combinatorics, by Lou van den Dries.

    In addition to the tutorials there will be several "state of the art" lectures on the program topics, indicating recent results as well as directions for future work. Speakers include Ekaterina Amerik, Ehud Hrushovski, Alice Medvedev, Terence Tao, and Margaret Thomas.

    The introductory workshop aims to familiarize graduate students, postdocs, and non-experts to major and new topics of the current program. Though the audience is expected to have a general mathematical background, knowledge of technical terminology and recent findings is not assumed.

    Updated on Feb 10, 2014 11:01 AM PST
  15. Workshop Introductory Workshop: Algebraic Topology

    Organizers: Teena Gerhardt (Michigan State University), Jesper Grodal (University of Copenhagen), Kathryn Hess (École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL)), LEAD Michael Hill (University of Virginia)

    Algebraic topology is a rich, vibrant field with close connections to many branches of mathematics. This workshop will describe the state of the field, focusing on major programs, open problems, exciting new tools, and cutting edge techniques.

    The introductory workshop serves as an overview to the overlying programmatic theme. It aims to familiarize graduate students, postdocs, and non-experts to major and new topics of the current program. Though the audience is expected to have a general mathematical background, knowledge of technical terminology and recent findings is not assumed.

    Updated on Jan 27, 2014 11:44 AM PST
  16. Workshop Connections for Women: Algebraic Topology

    Organizers: Julie Bergner (University of California), LEAD Teena Gerhardt (Michigan State University), Brooke Shipley (University of Illinois at Chicago)

    This two-day workshop will consist of short courses given by prominent female mathematicians in the field. These introductory courses will be appropriate for graduate students, post-docs, and researchers in related areas. The workshop will also include a panel discussion featuring successful women at various stages in their mathematical careers.

    Updated on Jan 21, 2014 01:08 PM PST
  17. Workshop Macaulay2 Workshop

    Organizers: Sonja Mapes (University of Notre Dame), Frank Moore (Wake Forest University), David Swinarski (University of Georgia)

    The purpose of the workshop is to bring Macaulay2 developers together with those who would like to share or develop their skills at writing packages for Macaulay2 and those interested in developing the corresponding mathematical algorithms.

    Updated on Aug 05, 2013 05:39 PM PDT
  18. Workshop Infinite-Dimensional Geometry

    Organizers: Lawrence Evans (University of California, Berkeley), Dmitry Jakobson (McGill University), Robert McCann (University of Toronto), LEAD Stephen Preston (University of Colorado)

    The purpose of this workshop is to gather researchers working in various areas of geometry in infinite dimensions in order to facilitate collaborations and sharing of ideas. Topics represented include optimal transport and geometries on densities, metrics on shape spaces, Euler-Arnold equations on diffeomorphism groups, the universal Teichmuller space, geometry of random Riemann surfaces, metrics on spaces of metrics, and related areas. The workshop will be held on the campus of University of California Berkeley (60 Evans Hall) the weekend of December 7-8, 2013. It is funded by an NSF grant.

    Updated on Dec 05, 2013 02:55 PM PST
  19. Workshop Initial Data and Evolution Problems in General Relativity

    Organizers: LEAD Piotr Chrusciel (Universität Wien), LEAD Igor Rodnianski (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

    This workshop discusses recent developments both in the study of the properties of initial data for Einstein's equations, and in the study of solutions of the Einstein evolution problem. Cosmic censorship, the formation and stability of black holes, the role of mass and quasi-local mass, and the construction of solutions of the Einstein constraint equations are focus problems for the workshop. We highlight recent developments, and examine major areas in which future progress is likely.

    Updated on Nov 26, 2013 09:16 AM PST
  20. Workshop Bay Area Differential Geometry Seminar (BADGS) Fall 2013

    Organizers: David Bao (San Francisco State University), Joel Hass (University of California, Davis), Rafe Mazzeo (Stanford University), Richard Montgomery (University of California, Santa Cruz), LEAD david hoffman (Stanford University)

    The Bay Area Differential Geometry Seminar meets 3 times each year and is a 1-day seminar on recent developments in differential geometry and geometric analysis, broadly interpreted. Typically, it runs from mid-morning until late afternoon, with 3-4 speakers. Lunch will be available and the final talk will be followed by dinner.

    Updated on Sep 18, 2013 12:07 PM PDT
  21. Workshop Fluid Mechanics, Hamiltonian Dynamics, and Numerical Aspects of Optimal Transportation

    Organizers: Yann Brenier (École Polytechnique), Michael Cullen (Met Office), LEAD Wilfrid Gangbo (Georgia Institute of Technology), Allen Tannenbaum (SUNY)

    The workshop will be devoted to emerging approaches to fluid mechanical, geophysical and kinetic theoretical flows based on optimal transportation. It will also explore numerical approaches to optimal transportation problems.

    Updated on Nov 05, 2013 12:34 PM PST
  22. Workshop Introductory Workshop: Mathematical Relativity

    Organizers: LEAD Justin Corvino (Lafayette College), Greg Galloway (University of Miami), Hans Ringström (Royal Institute of Technology (KTH))

    Mathematical relativity is a very widely ranging area of mathematical study, spanning differential geometry, elliptic and hyperbolic PDE, and dynamical systems. We introduce in this workshop some of the leading areas of current interest associated with problems in cosmology, the theory of black holes, and the geometry and physics of the Cauchy problem (initial data constraints and evolution) for the Einstein equations.

    The introductory workshop serves as an overview to the overlying programmatic theme. It aims to familiarize graduate students, postdocs, and non-experts to major and new topics of the current program. Though the audience is expected to have a general mathematical background, knowledge of technical terminology and recent findings is not assumed.

    Updated on Oct 23, 2013 10:04 AM PDT
  23. Workshop Connections for Women: Mathematical General Relativity

    Organizers: Beverly Berger (None), LEAD Lydia Bieri (University of Michigan), Iva Stavrov (Lewis and Clark College)

    Ever since the epic work of Yvonne Choquet-Bruhat on the well-posedness of Einstein's equations initiated the mathematical study of general relativity, women have played an important role in many areas of mathematical relativity. In this workshop, some of the leading women researchers in mathematical relativity present their work.

    Updated on Oct 23, 2013 10:03 AM PDT
  24. Workshop Introductory Workshop on Optimal Transport: Geometry and Dynamics

    Organizers: Luigi Ambrosio (Scuola Normale Superiore), Lawrence Evans (University of California, Berkeley), LEAD Alessio Figalli (University of Texas)

    The workshop is intended to give an overview of the research landscape surrounding optimal transportation, including its connections to geometry, design applications, and fully nonlinear partial differential equations.

    As such, it will feature some survey lectures or minicourses by distinguished visitors and/or a few of the organizers of the theme semester, amounting to a kind of summer school. These will be complemented by a sampling of research lectures and short presentations from a spectrum of invited guests and other participants, including some who attended the previous week's {\em Connections for Women} workshop.

    The introductory workshop aims to familiarize graduate students, postdocs, and non-experts to major and new topics of the current program. Though the audience is expected to have a general mathematical background, knowledge of technical terminology and recent findings is not assumed.

    Updated on Oct 23, 2013 10:02 AM PDT
  25. Workshop Connections for Women on Optimal Transport: Geometry and Dynamics

    Organizers: Sun-Yung Alice Chang (Princeton University), Panagiota Daskalopoulos (Columbia University), Robert McCann (University of Toronto), Maria Westdickenberg (RWTH Aachen)

    This two-day event aims to connect women graduate students and beginning researchers with more established female researchers who use optimal transportation in their work and can serve as professional contacts and potential role-models. As such, it will showcase a selection of lectures featuring female scientists, both established leaders and emerging researchers.

    These lectures will be interspersed with networking and social events such as lunch or tea-time discussions led by successful researchers about (a) the particular opportunities and challenges facing women in science---including practical topics such as work-life balance and choosing a mentor, and (b) promising new directions in optimal transportation and related topics. Junior participants will be paired with more senior researchers in mentoring groups, and all participants will be encouraged to stay for the Introductory Workshop the following week, where they will have the opportunity to propose a short research communication.

    Updated on Oct 02, 2013 08:49 AM PDT
  26. Summer Graduate School Introduction to the Mathematics of Seismic Imaging

    Organizers: LEAD Gunther Uhlmann (University of Washington)

    In this two week program we will develop some of the mathematical foundations of seismic imaging that is a basic tool used in ``Imaging the Earth Interior". This is one of the components of the Mathematics of Planet Earth year in 2013.

    The goal in seismic imaging is to determine the inner structure of the Earth from the crust to the inner core by using information provided by earthquakes in the case of the deep interior or by measuring the reflection of waves produced by acoustic or elastic sources on the surface of the Earth. The mathematics of seismic imaging involves solving inverse problems for the wave equation. No previous experience on inverse problems will be assumed.

    Updated on Jul 25, 2013 09:45 AM PDT
  27. Summer Graduate School Mathematical General Relativity in Cortona, Italy

    Organizers: Justin Corvino (Lafayette College), Pengzi Miao (University of Miami), Giorgio Patrizio (Istituto Nazionale di Alta Matematica "Francesco Severi" (INdAM))

    In cooperation with INdAM (Istituto Nazionale di Alta Matematica) and the CMI (Clay Mathematical Institute), MSRI will sponsor a summer graduate workshop on Mathematical General Relativity in Cortona during the summer of 2013; the school will reprise the very successful school of Mathematical General Relativity held at MSRI in 2012.

    Mathematical general relativity is the study of mathematical problems related to Einstein's theory of gravitation. There are interesting connections between the physical theory and problems in differential geometry and partial differential equations.

    The purpose of the summer school is to introduce graduate students to some fundamental aspects of mathematical general relativity, with particular emphasis on the geometry of the Einstein constraint equations and the Positive Mass Theorem. These topics will comprise a component of the upcoming semester program at MSRI in Fall 2013.

    There will be mini-courses, as well as several research lectures.

    Updated on Aug 01, 2013 10:02 AM PDT
  28. Summer Graduate School New Geometric Techniques in Number Theory

    Organizers: Toby Gee (Imperial College, London), LEAD Ariane Mézard (L'Institut de Mathématiques de Jussieu), David Nadler (University of California, Berkeley), Peter Scholze (Universität Bonn)

    The branches of number theory most directly related to automorphic forms have seen enormous progress over the past five years. Techniques introduced since 2008 have made it possible to prove many new arithmetic applications. The purpose of the current workshop is to drow the attention of young students or researchers to new questions that have arisen in the course of bringing several chapters in the Langlands program and related algebraic number theory to a close. We will focus especially on some precise questions of a geometric nature, or whose solutions seem to require new geometric insights. A graduate level in Number Theory is expected.

    This two-week workshop will be devoted to the following subjects: Automorphy lifting theorems, p-adic local Langlands program, Characters of categorical representations and Hasse-Weil zeta function. During the first week, the lecturers present an open question and related mathematical objects. The first exercice sessions serve to direct the participants to an appropriate subject depending on their level. During the second week, the lecturers give some more advanced lectures on the field.

    Updated on Jul 02, 2013 10:48 AM PDT
  29. Summer Graduate School IAS/PCMI Summer 2013: Geometric Analysis

    Organizers: Hubert Bray (Duke University), Greg Galloway (University of Miami), Rafe Mazzeo (Stanford University), Natasa Sesum (Rutgers University)

    This Summer Graduate Workshop will be held in Park City, Utah.

    The Graduate Summer School bridges the gap between a general graduate education in mathematics and the specific preparation necessary to do research on problems of current interest. In general, these students will have completed their first year, and in some cases, may already be working on a thesis. While a majority of the participants will be graduate students, some postdoctoral scholars and researchers may also be interested in attending.

    We strongly recommend that graduate students have already had the equivalent of rigorous first year graduate-level courses in topology, algebra and analysis.

    The main activity of the Graduate Summer School will be a set of intensive short lectures offered by leaders in the field, designed to introduce students to exciting, current research in mathematics. These lectures will not duplicate standard courses available elsewhere. Each course will consist of lectures with problem sessions. Course assistants will be available for each lecture series. The participants of the Graduate Summer School meet three times each day for lectures, with one or two problem sessions scheduled each day as well.

    Updated on May 06, 2013 11:06 AM PDT
There are more then 30 past workshops. Please go to Past workshops to see all past workshops.