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Upcoming Educational Events

  1. Workshop Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2015: Developmental Mathematics: For whom? Toward what ends?

    Organizers: Duane Cooper (Morehouse College), Mark Hoover (University of Michigan), LEAD Robert Megginson (University of Michigan), Richard Sgarlotti (Bay College), Katherine Stevenson (California State University, Northridge)

    This workshop will address the critical issue of developmental mathematics at two- and four-year colleges and universities and the broader dynamic of mathematics remediation that occurs at all levels. It will engage mathematicians, K-12 teachers, mathematics educators, and administrators in a conversation about the goals of developmental mathematics and the contributions that our different professional communities make to this work. Key questions that will be addressed are:

    1. How do we teach content in ways that acknowledge and leverage each student's prior learning experiences? In particular, how do we take advantage of a student's maturity while refining his or her learning habits where necessary?

    2. How can developmental mathematics instruction move students through mathematics which must be relearned while simultaneously gaining momentum on more advanced mathematics (including the development of mathematical practices needed for meaningful mathematical work)?

    3. What are strategies for supporting the needs of the wide range of students in developmental mathematics programs--those developing mathematical skills for life in general as well as those developing the foundation necessary to proceed towards a STEM major?  How can we successfully address equity issues raised for students from groups underrepresented in STEM fields? How can developmental mathematics instruction blend synchronous and asynchronous instruction to achieve maximal efficiency and impact?

    4. What is the proper balance between addressing the needs of the wide range of students mentioned in the preceding point and keeping instruction and course offerings concise?

    5. What are the characteristics, training, and practices of a successful developmental mathematics teacher?

    6. What support services enhance the success of a developmental mathematics program?

    Updated on Mar 02, 2015 04:44 PM PST
  2. Workshop Partnerships: a workshop on collaborations between the NSF and private foundations

    Organizers: Cynthia Atherton (Heising-Simons Foundation), Paulette Clancy (Cornell University), LEAD David Eisenbud (MSRI - Mathematical Sciences Research Institute), Thomas Everhart (California Institute of Technology), Caty Pilachowski (Indiana University, Bloomington), Robert Shelton (Research Corporation for Science Advancement), Yuri Tschinkel (New York University, Courant Institute)

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) and non-profit organizations each provide critical support to the U.S. basic research enterprise in the mathematical and physical sciences. While the missions of these funders differ, many of their goals align and the grantee communities have significant overlap. With the ultimate aim of helping to advance the scientific frontier in the most effective way, we propose to hold a workshop to examine partnerships between the Directorate of Mathematical and Physical Sciences (MPS) at NSF and non-profit funders in MPS-related disciplines to

    •       understand different models of collaboration (the “how”);
    •       understand different motivations for collaboration (the “why”); and
    •       develop opportunities for future communication and/or collaboration.

    Updated on Feb 23, 2015 11:34 AM PST
  3. MSRI-UP MSRI-UP 2015: Geometric Combinatorics Motivated by Social Sciences

    Organizers: Federico Ardila (San Francisco State University), LEAD Duane Cooper (Morehouse College), Herbert Medina (Loyola Marymount University), Ivelisse M. Rubio (University of Puerto Rico), Suzanne Weekes (Worcester Polytechnic Institute)

    The MSRI-UP summer program is designed for undergraduate students who have completed two years of university-level mathematics courses and would like to conduct research in the mathematical sciences. Due to funding restrictions, only U.S. citizens and permanent residents are eligible to apply and the program cannot accept foreign students regardless of funding. The academic portion of the 2015 program will be led by Prof. Francis Su from Harvey Mudd College.

    Updated on Dec 01, 2014 04:17 PM PST
  4. Summer Graduate School CRM-PIMS Summer School in Probability

    Organizers: LEAD Louigi Addario-Berry (McGill University), Omer Angel, Louis-Pierre Arguin, Martin Barlow, Edwin Perkins, Lea Popovic (Concordia University)

    The 2015 CRM-PIMS Summer School in Probability will take place in Montreal, Canada, from June 15-July 11, 2015. The school is built around two principal 24-hour lecture courses, which will be delivered by Alice Guionnet (random matrices, free probability and the enumeration of maps) and Remco van der Hofstad (high-dimensional percolation and random graphs). There will additionally be mini-courses by Louigi Addario-Berry (random minimum spanning trees), Shankar Bhamidi (dynamic random network models) and Jonathan Mattingly (stabilization by noise). Some time is reserved for participants to present their own work.

    Updated on Nov 03, 2014 09:28 AM PST
  5. Summer Graduate School Geometric Group Theory

    Organizers: LEAD John Mackay (University of Bristol), Anne Thomas (University of Glasgow), Kevin Wortman (University of Utah)

    The aim of this workshop is to introduce graduate students to some specific core topics which will be under study at the upcoming MSRI program on Geometric Group Theory (GGT) in 2016.  GGT encompasses a wide range of topics. The four minicourse topics have been chosen because they are central themes in GGT and in the upcoming MSRI program. Moreover, each topic is accessible to students with a range of backgrounds: the basic definitions are straightforward, with many simple and illuminating examples to work through, yet lead through to important questions in current research.

    Updated on Aug 28, 2014 01:51 PM PDT
  6. Summer Graduate School Seminaire de Mathematiques Superieures 2015: Geometric and Computational Spectral Theory

    Organizers: Alexandre Girouard (Laval University), Dmitry Jakobson (McGill University), Michael Levitin (University of Reading), Nilima Nigam (Simon Fraser University), Iosif Polterovich (Université de Montréal), Frederic Rochon (Université du Québec à Montréal)

    The lectures will focus on the following four topics: geometry of eigenvalues, geometry of eigenfunctions, spectral theory on manifolds with singularities and computational spectral theory. There has been a number of remarkable recent developments in these closely related fields. The goal of the school is to shed light on different facets of modern spectral theory and to provide a unique opportunity for graduate students and young researchers to get a “big picture” of this rapidly evolving area of mathematics. A particularly novel aspect of the school is the emphasis on the interactions between spectral geometry and computational spectral theory.

    Updated on Jan 28, 2015 10:59 AM PST
  7. Summer Graduate School Mathematical Topics in Systems Biology

    Organizers: LEAD Steven Altschuler (University of California, San Francisco), Lani Wu (UCSF)

    This Summer Graduate School will introduce mathematics graduate students to the rapidly emerging area of systems biology. In particular, we will focus on the design and emergent behaviors of molecular networks used by cells to interpret their environments and create robust temporal-spatial behaviors. This will be a very hands-on workshop with students working alone and in teams to program and present key ideas.

    Updated on Aug 28, 2014 12:08 PM PDT
  8. Summer Graduate School NIMS Summer School on Random Matrix Theory

    Organizers: LEAD Jinho Baik (University of Michigan)

    This summer graduate school will take place at the National Institute for Mathematical Sciences in Daejeon, South Korea.  The purpose of this summer school is to introduce some of the basic ideas and methods of random matrix theory to graduate students.  In particular there will be three lecture series on random matrix theory from three different perspectives: from the view points of the integrable structures, the moment method, and the Stieltjes transorm technique.  In addition to the lectures, there will be discussion sessions, and the students will also have plenty of time to interact with the lecturers and with other students.

    Please note that accepted students will be provided up to $1700 in travel reimbursement, in addition to meals and accommodation.

    Updated on Nov 20, 2014 12:02 PM PST
  9. Summer Graduate School Berkeley summer course in mining and modeling of neuroscience data

    Organizers: Ingrid Daubechies (Duke University), Bruno Olshausen (University of California, Berkeley), Christos Papadimitriou (University of California, Berkeley), Fritz Sommer, LEAD Jeff Teeters (University of California, Berkeley)

    This course is for students and researchers with backgrounds in mathematics and computational sciences who are
    interested in applying their skills toward problems in neuroscience. It will introduce the major open questions of
    neuroscience and teach state-of–the-art techniques for analyzing and modeling neuroscience data sets. The course is designed for students at the graduate level and researchers with background in a quantitative field such as
    engineering, mathematics, physics or computer science who may or may not have a specific neuroscience
    background. The goal of this summer course is to help researchers find new exciting research areas and at the same time to strengthen quantitative expertise in the field of neuroscience. The course is sponsored by the National Science Foundation from a grant supporting activities at the data sharing repository CRCNS.org, the Helen Wills
    Neuroscience Institute, the Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing and the Mathematical Science Research
    Institute.

    Updated on Feb 23, 2015 03:59 PM PST
  10. Summer Graduate School Gaps between Primes and Analytic Number Theory

    Organizers: Dimitris Koukoulopoulos (Université de Montréal), LEAD Emmanuel Kowalski (ETH Zurich), James Maynard (University of Oxford), Kannan Soundararajan (Stanford University)

    These courses will give students a full overview of the results of Zhang and Maynard on gaps between primes, and will provide them will a clear understanding of the tools involved. This will make accessible a significant part of modern analytic number theory. The lecturers will also make sure to include, within their course, examples and discussions going further than is strictly required to understand the proofs of Zhang and Maynard, e.g., in the direction of automorphic forms and the Riemann Hypothesis over finite fields.

    Updated on Dec 09, 2014 12:23 PM PST
  11. Summer Graduate School Incompressible Fluid Flows at High Reynolds Number

    Organizers: Jacob Bedrossian (University of Maryland), LEAD Vlad Vicol (Princeton University)

    The purpose of this two week workshop is to introduce graduate students to state-of-the-art methods and results in mathematical fluid dynamics. In the first week, we will discuss the mathematical foundations and modern analysis aspects of the Navier-Stokes and Euler equations. In the second week, we will run two courses concurrently on the topics of inviscid limits and hydrodynamic stability. Specifically, one course will focus on boundary layers in high Reynolds number flows and the Prandtl equations while the other will focus on mixing and connections to turbulence. Through the lectures and associated problem sessions, the students will learn about a number of new analysis tools and principles of fluid mechanics that are not always taught in a graduate school curriculum.

    Updated on Aug 28, 2014 08:47 AM PDT
  12. Summer Graduate School An Introduction to Character Theory and the McKay Conjecture

    Organizers: Robert Guralnick (University of Southern California), Pham Tiep (University of Arizona)

    Character Theory of Finite Groups provides one of the most powerful tools to study groups. In this course we will give a gentle introduction to basic results in the Character Theory, as well as some of the main conjectures in Group Representation Theory, with particular emphasis on the McKay Conjecture.

    Updated on Jan 13, 2015 12:51 PM PST
  13. Summer Graduate School Chip Firing and Tropical Curves

    Organizers: LEAD Matthew Baker (Georgia Institute of Technology), Melody Chan (Harvard University), Sam Payne (Yale University)

    Tropical geometry uses a combination of techniques from algebraic geometry, combinatorics, and convex polyhedral geometry to study degenerations of algebraic varieties; the simplest tropical objects are tropical curves, which one can think of as "shadows" of algebraic curves.  Linear equivalence of divisors on an abstract tropical curve is determined by a simple but rich combinatorial process called "chip firing", which was discovered independently in the discrete setting by physicists and graph theorists.  From a pedagogical point of view, one can view tropical curves as a combinatorial model for the highly analogous but more abstract theory of algebraic curves, but there is in fact much more to the story than this: one can use tropical curves and chip firing to prove theorems in algebraic geometry and number theory.  This field is relatively new, so participants will have the opportunity to start from scratch and still get a glimpse of the cutting edge in this active research area.

    Updated on Jan 13, 2015 12:40 PM PST