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  1. Workshop 2020 SACNAS – The National Diversity in STEM Conference

    The largest multidisciplinary and multicultural STEM diversity event in the country, the SACNAS conference serves to equip, empower, and energize participants for their academic and professional paths in STEM.

    For more information, click HERE.

    Updated on Oct 19, 2020 09:32 AM PDT
  1. Workshop Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2021: Initiating, Sustaining, and Researching Mathematics Department Transformation of Introductory Courses for STEM Majors

    Organizers: Naneh Apkarian (Arizona State University), David Bressoud (Macalester College), Pamela Burdman (Just Equations), Jamylle Carter (Diablo Valley college), Ted Coe (Northwest Evaluation Association), Estrella Johnson (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University), W. Gary Martin (Auburn University), Michael O'Sullivan (San Diego State University), William Penuel (University of Colorado), LEAD Chris Rasmussen (San Diego State University), Daniel Reinholz (San Diego State University), Wendy Smith (University of Nebraska), David Webb (University of Colorado)

    The world is changing, along with perceptions. Many call for the improvement of mathematics teaching and learning, for both citizenry and STEM preparation. To achieve sustainable change, though, the focus needs to extend from individuals to systems. It is not enough to change one classroom or one course. Transformation requires change at all levels: in teaching, programmatic practices, and institutions. This workshop will bring together teachers and researchers from universities, community colleges, and K-12 schools to explore the reasons for and processes by which change in university mathematics departments is initiated, promoted, and sustained and lessons learned from change efforts in K-12. It will review what we know about change at all levels and reflect on stories of failure and success.

    Updated on Sep 11, 2020 01:00 PM PDT
  2. Summer Graduate School 2021 CRM-PIMS Summer School in Probability (CRM, Montreal)

    Organizers: LEAD Louigi Addario-Berry (McGill University), Omer Angel (University of British Columbia), Alexander Fribergh (University of Montreal), Mathav Murugan (University of British Columbia), Edwin Perkins (University of British Columbia)
    Image
    The Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model, aka the randomly-weighted complete graph. Edge weights are indicated using grayscale. Six distinguished vertices have been randomly chosen; edges between those vertices are shaded black to form a "hidden signal".

    The courses in this summer school focus on mathematical models of group dynamics, how to describe their dynamics and their scaling limits, and the connection to discrete and continuous optimization problems.

    The phrase "group dynamics" is used loosely here -- it may refer to species migration, the spread of a virus, or the propagation of electrons through an inhomogeneous medium, to name a few examples. Very commonly, such systems can be described via stochastic processes which approximately behave like the solution of an appropriate partial differential equation in the large-population limit.

    Updated on Aug 31, 2020 10:40 AM PDT
  3. Summer Graduate School Sparsity of Algebraic Points

    Organizers: Philipp Habegger (University of Basel), LEAD Hector Pasten (Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile)
    Sgspic
    The Corvaja-Zannier proof of Siegel's theorem using subspaces. Illustrated by Sofía Pastén Vásquez.

    The theory of Diophantine equations is understood today as the study of algebraic points in algebraic varieties, and it is often the case that algebraic points of arithmetic relevance are expected to be sparse.

    This summer school will introduce the participants to two of the main techniques in the subject: (i) the filtration method to prove algebraic degeneracy of integral points by means of the subspace theorem, leading to special cases of conjectures by Bombieri, Lang, and Vojta, and (ii) unlikely intersections through o-minimality and bi-algebraic geometry, leading to results in the context of the Manin-Mumford conjecture, the André-Oort conjecture, and generalizations. This SGS should provide an entry point to a very active research area in modern number theory.

    Updated on Sep 15, 2020 04:26 PM PDT
  4. Summer Graduate School Mathematics of Big Data: Sketching and (Multi-) Linear Algebra

    Organizers: LEAD Kenneth Clarkson (IBM Research Division), Lior Horesh (IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center)
    Image %281%29

    This summer school will introduce graduate students to sketching-based approaches to computational linear and multi-linear algebra. Sketching here refers to a set of techniques for compressing a matrix, to one with fewer rows, or columns, or entries, usually via various kinds of random linear maps. We will discuss matrix computations, tensor algebras, and such sketching techniques, together with their applications and analysis.

    Updated on Aug 04, 2020 09:38 AM PDT
  5. Summer Graduate School Foundations and Frontiers of Probabilistic Proofs (Zurich, Switzerland)

    Organizers: Alessandro Chiesa (University of California, Berkeley), Tom Gur (University of Warwick)
    Proofs main logo
    Several executions of a 3-dimensional sumcheck protocol with a random order of directions (thanks to Dev Ojha for creating the diagram)

    Proofs are at the foundations of mathematics. Viewed through the lens of theoretical computer science, verifying the correctness of a mathematical proof is a fundamental computational task. Indeed, the P versus NP problem, which deals precisely with the complexity of proof verification, is one of the most important open problems in all of mathematics.

    The complexity-theoretic study of proof verification has led to exciting reenvisionings of mathematical proofs. For example, probabilistically checkable proofs (PCPs) admit local-to-global structure that allows verifying a proof by reading only a minuscule portion of it. As another example, interactive proofs allow for verification via a conversation between a prover and a verifier, instead of the traditional static sequence of logical statements. The study of such proof systems has drawn upon deep mathematical tools to derive numerous applications to the theory of computation and beyond.

    In recent years, such probabilistic proofs received much attention due to a new motivation, delegation of computation, which is the emphasis of this summer school. This paradigm admits ultra-fast protocols that allow one party to check the correctness of the computation performed by another, untrusted, party. These protocols have even been realized within recently-deployed technology, for example, as part of cryptographic constructions known as succinct non-interactive arguments of knowledge (SNARKs).

    This summer school will provide an introduction to the field of probabilistic proofs and the beautiful mathematics behind it, as well as prepare students for conducting cutting-edge research in this area.

    Updated on Aug 04, 2020 09:47 AM PDT
  6. Summer Graduate School Metric Geometry and Geometric Analysis (Oxford, United Kingdom)

    Organizers: LEAD Cornelia Drutu (University of Oxford), Panos Papazoglou (University of Oxford)

    The purpose of the summer school is to introduce graduate students to key mainstream directions in the recent development of geometry, which sprang from Riemannian Geometry in an attempt to use its methods in various contexts of non-smooth geometry. This concerns recent developments in metric generalizations of the theory of nonpositively curved spaces and discretizations of methods in geometry, geometric measure theory and global analysis. The metric geometry perspective gave rise to new results and problems in Riemannian Geometry as well.

    All these themes are intertwined and have developed either together or greatly influencing one another. The summer school will introduce some of the latest developments and the remaining open problems in these very modern areas, and will emphasize their synergy.

     

    Updated on Aug 04, 2020 10:05 AM PDT
  7. Summer Graduate School Gauge Theory in Geometry and Topology

    Organizers: Lynn Heller (Universität Hannover), Francesco Lin (Columbia University), LEAD Laura Starkston (University of California, Davis), Boyu Zhang (Princeton University)
    965 image
    Image by Nick Schmitt

    Figure 1. A rotationally symmetric solution to the self-duality equations on an open and dense subset of the torus. Singularities appear where the surface intersects the ideal boundary at infinity of the hyperbolic 3-space visualized by the wireframe.

    Gauge theory is a geometric language used to formulate many fundamental physical phenomena, which has also had profound impact on our understanding of topology. The main idea is to study the space of solutions to partial differential equations admitting a very large group of local symmetries. Starting in the late 1970s, mathematicians began to unravel surprising connections between gauge theory and many aspects of geometric analysis, algebraic geometry and low-dimensional topology. This influence of gauge theory in geometry and topology is pervasive nowadays, and new developments continue to emerge.

    The goal of the summer school is to introduce students to the foundational aspects of gauge theory, and explore their relations to geometric analysis and low-dimensional topology. By the end of the two-week program, the students will understand the relevant analytic and geometric aspects of several partial differential equations of current interest (including the Yang-Mills ASD equations, the Seiberg-Witten equations, and the Hitchin equations) and some of their most impactful applications to problems in geometry and topology.

    Updated on Aug 04, 2020 10:04 AM PDT
  8. Summer Graduate School Random Conformal Geometry

    Organizers: Mario Bonk (University of California, Los Angeles), Steffen Rohde (University of Washington), LEAD Fredrik Viklund (Royal Institute of Technology)
    Graphisc
    a random quasiconformal map obtained from Beltrami equation by randomly assigning the values of +-1/2 for the Beltrami coefficient on small squares subdividing the unit square

    This Summer Graduate School will cover basic tools that are instrumental in Random Conformal Geometry (the investigation of analytic and geometric objects that arise from natural probabilistic constructions, often motivated by models in mathematical physics) and are at the foundation of the subsequent semester-long program  "The Analysis and Geometry of Random Spaces".  Specific topics are Conformal Field Theory, Brownian Loops and related processes, Quasiconformal Maps, as well as Loewner Energy and Teichmüller Theory.

    Updated on Aug 04, 2020 10:24 AM PDT
  9. Summer Graduate School Recent Topics in Well Posedness (Taipei, Taiwan)

    Organizers: Jungkai Chen (National Taiwan University), Yoshikazu Giga (University of Tokyo), Maria Schonbek (University of California, Santa Cruz), Tsuyoshi Yoneda (University of Tokyo)

    The purpose of the workshop is to introduce graduate students to fundamental results on the Navier-Stokes and the Euler equations, with special emphasis on the solvability of its initial value problem with rough initial data as well as the large time behavior of a solution. These topics have long research history. However, recent studies clarify the problems from a broad point of view, not only from analysis but also from detailed studies of orbit of the flow.

    Updated on Jul 20, 2020 10:01 AM PDT

Past Educational Events

  1. Summer Graduate School Introduction to water waves [Virtual Summer Graduate School]

    Organizers: Mihaela Ifrim (University of Wisconsin-Madison), Daniel Tataru (University of California, Berkeley)
    Img 6168
    Overturning wave, artistic drawing by E. Ifrim

    Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, this summer school will be held online.

    The purpose of this two weeks school is to introduce graduate students to the state of the art methods and results in the study of incompressible Euler’s equations in general, and water waves in particular. This is a research area which is highly relevant to many real life problems, and in which substantial progress has been made in the last decade.

     

    The goal is to present the main current research directions in water waves. We will begin with the physical derivation of the equations, and present some of the analytic tools needed in study. The final goal will be two-fold, namely (i) to understand the local solvability of the Cauchy problem for water waves, as well as (ii) to describe the long time behavior of solutions.

    Through the lectures and associated problem sessions, students will learn about a number of new analysis tools which are not routinely taught in a graduate school curriculum. The goal is to help students acquire the knowledge needed in order to start research in water waves and Euler equations.

    Updated on Jul 27, 2020 08:40 AM PDT
  2. Summer Graduate School Séminaire de Mathématiques Supérieures 2020: Discrete Probability, Physics and Algorithms (Montréal, Canada) [Virtual Summer Graduate School]

    Organizers: Gerard Ben Arous (New York University, Courant Institute), LEAD Alexander Fribergh (University of Montreal), Lea Popovic (Concordia University)
    Image

    Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, this summer school will be held online.

    Probability theory, statistics as well as mathematical physics have increasingly been used in computer science. The goal of this school is to provide a unique opportunity for graduate students and young researchers to developed multi-disciplinary skills in a rapidly evolving area of mathematics.

    The topics would include spin glasses, constraint satisfiability, randomized algorithms, Monte-Carlo Markov chains and high-dimensional statistics, sparse and random graphs, computational complexity, estimation and approximation algorithms. Those topics will fall into two main categories, on the one hand problems related to spin glasses and on the other hand random algorithms.

    The part of the summer school dedicated to spin glasses will be split into three parts: an introductory course about traditional spin glasses followed by two more advanced courses where spin glasses meet computer science in addition to a talk on dynamics of spin glasses. The part of the summer school on random algorithms will consist of an introductory course on phase transitions in large random structures, followed by advanced courses on theoretical bounds for computational complexity in reconstruction and inference, and on understanding rare events in random graphs and models of statistical mechanics.

    The two introductory courses on spin glasses and on random algorithms will be accompanied by three exercises sessions of one hour. A one hour exercises session will follow each of the three sessions of a course for both the introductory course on spin glasses and the introductory course on random algorithms. Exercises sessions will be led by an assistant, but will primarily focus on participation of the students.

    Updated on May 26, 2020 12:21 PM PDT
  3. MSRI-UP MSRI-UP 2020: Branched Covers of Curves

    Organizers: Federico Ardila (San Francisco State University), LEAD Duane Cooper (Morehouse College), Maria Franco (Queensborough Community College (CUNY); MSRI - Mathematical Sciences Research Institute), Rebecca Garcia (Sam Houston State University), Edray Goins (Pomona College), Suzanne Weekes (Worcester Polytechnic Institute)

    The MSRI-UP summer program is designed to serve a diverse group of undergraduate students who would like to conduct research in the mathematical sciences.

    In 2020, MSRI-Up will focus on Branched Covers of Curves. The research program will be led by Dr. Edray Goins, Professor of Mathematics at Pomona College.

    Updated on Jul 22, 2020 03:11 PM PDT
  4. Workshop [Moved Online] Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2020: Today’s Mathematics, Social Justice, and Implications for Schools

    Organizers: Meredith Broussard (New York Unviersity), Victor Donnay (Bryn Mawr College), Courtney Ginsberg (Math for America), Luis Leyva (Vanderbilt University), Candice Price (Smith College), Chris Rasmussen (San Diego State University), LEAD Katherine Stevenson (California State University, Northridge), William Tate (Washington University in St. Louis)

    Due to the COVID-19 virus outbreak, the Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2020 workshop was held online. The full workshop description and list of talks can be found HERE.

    On May 22 portions of the Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2020: Today’s Mathematics, Social Justice, and Implications for Schools workshop will be streamed online via Zoom.

    Friday 5/22: 12pm PST (3pm eastern time)

    12:00 - 1:00
    Rico Gutstein, Preparing Students Today for Whatever Tomorrow Brings

    Updated on May 28, 2020 08:56 AM PDT
  5. Workshop [Moved Online] Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2020: Today’s Mathematics, Social Justice, and Implications for Schools

    Organizers: Meredith Broussard (New York Unviersity), Victor Donnay (Bryn Mawr College), Courtney Ginsberg (Math for America), Luis Leyva (Vanderbilt University), Candice Price (Smith College), Chris Rasmussen (San Diego State University), LEAD Katherine Stevenson (California State University, Northridge), William Tate (Washington University in St. Louis)

    Due to the COVID-19 virus outbreak, the Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2020 workshop was held online. The full workshop description and list of talks can be found HERE.

    On May 15 portions of the Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2020: Today’s Mathematics, Social Justice, and Implications for Schools workshop will be streamed online via Zoom.

    Friday 5/15: 12pm PST (3pm eastern time)

    12:00 - 1:00
    Dan Reinholz, Preparing teachers to notice, name, and disrupt racial and gender inequity

    Updated on May 28, 2020 08:53 AM PDT
  6. Workshop [Moved Online] Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2020: Today’s Mathematics, Social Justice, and Implications for Schools

    Organizers: Meredith Broussard (New York Unviersity), Victor Donnay (Bryn Mawr College), Courtney Ginsberg (Math for America), Luis Leyva (Vanderbilt University), Candice Price (Smith College), Chris Rasmussen (San Diego State University), LEAD Katherine Stevenson (California State University, Northridge), William Tate (Washington University in St. Louis)

    Due to the COVID-19 virus outbreak, the Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2020 workshop was held online. The full workshop description and list of talks can be found HERE.

    Friday 5/8: 12pm PST (3pm eastern time)

    12:00 - 1:00
    Nathan Alexander, Mathematical Models in the Sociological Imagination
    Lincoln Chandler, Pursuing Racial Equity within Schools 

    Updated on May 12, 2020 08:42 AM PDT
  7. Workshop [Moved Online] Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2020: Today’s Mathematics, Social Justice, and Implications for Schools

    Organizers: Meredith Broussard (New York Unviersity), Victor Donnay (Bryn Mawr College), Courtney Ginsberg (Math for America), Luis Leyva (Vanderbilt University), Candice Price (Smith College), Chris Rasmussen (San Diego State University), LEAD Katherine Stevenson (California State University, Northridge), William Tate (Washington University in St. Louis)

    Due to the COVID-19 virus outbreak, the Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2020 workshop was held online. The full workshop description and list of talks can be found HERE.

    Friday 5/01: 12pm PST (3pm eastern time)

    12:00 - 1:00 Hyman Bass, 'Mathematics and Social Justice': An undergraduate course. What could this be?

    Updated on May 12, 2020 08:41 AM PDT
  8. Workshop [Moved Online] Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2020: Today’s Mathematics, Social Justice, and Implications for Schools

    Organizers: Meredith Broussard (New York Unviersity), Victor Donnay (Bryn Mawr College), Courtney Ginsberg (Math for America), Luis Leyva (Vanderbilt University), Candice Price (Smith College), Chris Rasmussen (San Diego State University), LEAD Katherine Stevenson (California State University, Northridge), William Tate (Washington University in St. Louis)

    Due to the COVID-19 virus outbreak, the Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2020 workshop was held online. The full workshop description and list of talks can be found HERE.

    Friday 4/24: 12pm PST (3pm eastern time)

    12:00 - 1:00 Padmanabhan Seshaiyer, K-12 to Post-Secondary Viewpoint Critical Issues in Mathematics Education

    Updated on May 12, 2020 08:41 AM PDT
  9. Workshop [Moved Online] Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2020: Today’s Mathematics, Social Justice, and Implications for Schools

    Organizers: Meredith Broussard (New York Unviersity), Victor Donnay (Bryn Mawr College), Courtney Ginsberg (Math for America), Luis Leyva (Vanderbilt University), Candice Price (Smith College), Chris Rasmussen (San Diego State University), LEAD Katherine Stevenson (California State University, Northridge), William Tate (Washington University in St. Louis)

    Due to the COVID-19 virus outbreak, the Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2020 workshop was held online. The full workshop description and list of talks can be found HERE.

    Friday 4/17: 12pm PST (3pm eastern time)

    12:00 - 1:00 Some unintended consequences of active learning

    Sage Forbes-Gray, Sunset Park High School,  Brooklyn, NY, Mfa Master Teacher 
    Sharon Collins - New Heights Academy Charter School, NYC, MfA Master Teacher; 
    Kate Belin - Fannie Lou High School, NYC, MfA Master Teacher; 

    Moderator: Courtney Ginsberg, MfA
    Host: Katherine Stevenson, CSUN

    Updated on May 12, 2020 08:41 AM PDT
  10. Workshop [Moved Online] Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2020: Today’s Mathematics, Social Justice, and Implications for Schools

    Organizers: Meredith Broussard (New York Unviersity), Victor Donnay (Bryn Mawr College), Courtney Ginsberg (Math for America), Luis Leyva (Vanderbilt University), Candice Price (Smith College), Chris Rasmussen (San Diego State University), LEAD Katherine Stevenson (California State University, Northridge), William Tate (Washington University in St. Louis)

    Due to the COVID-19 virus outbreak, the Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2020 workshop was held online. The full workshop description and list of talks can be found HERE.

    Friday 4/10: 12pm PST (3pm eastern time)

    12:00 - 1:00 Estrella Johnson, Some unintended consequences of active learning

    Updated on May 12, 2020 08:40 AM PDT
  11. Workshop {Moved Online] Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2020: Today’s Mathematics, Social Justice, and Implications for Schools

    Organizers: Meredith Broussard (New York Unviersity), Victor Donnay (Bryn Mawr College), Courtney Ginsberg (Math for America), Luis Leyva (Vanderbilt University), Candice Price (Smith College), Chris Rasmussen (San Diego State University), LEAD Katherine Stevenson (California State University, Northridge), William Tate (Washington University in St. Louis)

    Due to the COVID-19 virus outbreak, the Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2020 workshop was held online. The full workshop description and list of talks can be found HERE.

    Friday 3/27: Starting at 12pm PST (3pm eastern time)

    12:00p - 1:00p
    Nicol Turner Lee, Brookings Inst., Center for Tech Innov. -  Unconscious Bias
    Saber Khan, Processing Foundation, leader of #EthicalCS -  Identity & Ethics

    Updated on May 12, 2020 08:40 AM PDT
  12. Workshop [Moved Online] Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2020: Today’s Mathematics, Social Justice, and Implications for Schools

    Organizers: Meredith Broussard (New York Unviersity), Victor Donnay (Bryn Mawr College), Courtney Ginsberg (Math for America), Luis Leyva (Vanderbilt University), Candice Price (Smith College), Chris Rasmussen (San Diego State University), LEAD Katherine Stevenson (California State University, Northridge), William Tate (Washington University in St. Louis)

    Due to the COVID-19 virus outbreak, the Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2020 workshop was held online. The full workshop description and list of talks can be found HERE.

    Friday 3/20: Starting at 12pm PST (3pm eastern time)

    12:00p - 12:45p Lisa Goldberg, Hot Hands: What Data Science Can (and Can't) Tell Us About Basketball Trends
    12:45p - 1:00p Discussion with Lisa and Kate on:  What Bayes tells us about our ability to reason about randomness

    Updated on May 12, 2020 08:37 AM PDT
  13. Workshop [Moved Online] Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2020: Today’s Mathematics, Social Justice, and Implications for Schools

    Organizers: Meredith Broussard (New York Unviersity), Victor Donnay (Bryn Mawr College), Courtney Ginsberg (Math for America), Luis Leyva (Vanderbilt University), Candice Price (Smith College), Chris Rasmussen (San Diego State University), LEAD Katherine Stevenson (California State University, Northridge), William Tate (Washington University in St. Louis)

    Due to the COVID-19 virus outbreak, the Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2020 workshop was held online. The full workshop description and list of talks can be found HERE.

    On March 12 and March 13, portions of the Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2020: Today’s Mathematics, Social Justice, and Implications for Schools workshop will be streamed online via Zoom. Only the talks below will are scheduled at this time.  Further talks may be scheduled at a later date, and you will be notified when we know more.

    Please see the schedule below, as well as links to the two sessions.
     

    Thursday 3/12: Starting at 9am PST (noon eastern time)
    9:00 - 9:10 Welcoming remarks
    9:10 - 9:15 Introduction to CIME 2020 plan and speaker David Daley
    9:15 - 9:55 David Daley, Why Your Vote Doesn't Count
    9:55 - 10:00 Kate Stevenson, introduction of activity
    10:00-10:30 Mathical Book Prize Announcement

    Friday 3/13: Starting at 9am PST (noon eastern time)
    9:00 - 9:05 Introduction of speaker Wesley Pegden
    9:05 - 9:45 Wesley Pegden, Bringing Mathematics to the Courtroom
    9:45 - 10:00 Q&A
     

    A formal Notice of Change letter is available here, which can be shared with your institution, funding agency, and others.

    Updated on May 28, 2020 08:57 AM PDT
  14. Workshop Symposium in Honor of Julia Robinson’s 100th Birthday

    Organizers: Hélène Barcelo (MSRI - Mathematical Sciences Research Institute), Thomas Scanlon (University of California, Berkeley), Carol Wood (Wesleyan University)

    MSRI will host a Symposium on the occasion of Julia Robinson’s 100th birthday on Monday, December 9, 2019 at MSRI. Julia Robinson (1919-1985) was an internationally renowned logician of the twentieth century. She was a trailblazer in mathematics as well as in many other ways: she was the first woman president of the American Mathematical Society, and the first woman mathematician elected to membership in the National Academy of Sciences.

    Participating speakers in this day-long celebration of her work and of current mathematics insprired by her research include: Martin Davis, Kirsten Eisentrager, Yuri Matiyasevich, and  Lou van den Dries. Following the symposium, Lenore Blum will give a public lecture at UC Berkeley.

    Updated on Nov 22, 2019 03:54 PM PST
  15. Workshop Modern Math Workshop 2019

    Organizers: Sudipta Dasmohapatra (Duke University ), Christian Ratsch (University of California, Los Angeles; Institute of Pure and Applied Mathematics (IPAM)), Michael Singer (North Carolina State University), Ulrica Wilson (Morehouse College; Institute for Computational and Experimental Research in Mathematics (ICERM))
    Mmw2016

    As part of the Mathematical Sciences Collaborative Diversity Initiatives, six mathematics institutes are pleased to host their annual SACNAS pre-conference event, the 2019 Modern Math Workshop (MMW). The Modern Math Workshop is intended to encourage minority undergraduates to pursue careers in the mathematical sciences and to assist undergraduates, graduate students and recent PhDs in building their research networks.

    Updated on Dec 18, 2019 02:42 PM PST
  16. Summer Graduate School Toric Varieties (National Center for Theoretical Sciences, Taipei, Taiwan)

    Organizers: David Cox (Amherst College), Henry Schenck (Auburn University)
    Firstchoice cropped
    This simplicial fan in 3-dimensional space

    Toric varieties are algebraic varieties defined by combinatorial data, and there is a wonderful interplay between algebra, combinatorics and geometry involved in their study. Many of the key concepts of abstract algebraic geometry (for example, constructing a variety by gluing affine pieces) have very concrete interpretations in the toric case, making toric varieties an ideal tool for introducing students to abstruse concepts.

    Updated on Jul 14, 2020 04:08 PM PDT
  17. Summer Graduate School H-Principle (INdAM, Cortona, Italy)

    Organizers: LEAD Emmy Murphy (Northwestern University), Takashi Tsuboi (University of Tokyo)
    072 04 small
    The image of a large sphere isometrically embedded into a small space through a C^1 embedding. (Attributions: E. Bartzos, V. Borrelli, R. Denis, F. Lazarus, D. Rohmer, B. Thibert)

    This two week summer school will introduce graduate students to the theory of h-principles.  After building up the theory from basic smooth topology, we will focus on more recent developments of the theory, particularly applications to symplectic and contact geometry, fluid dynamics, and foliation theory.

    Updated on Aug 08, 2019 09:31 AM PDT
  18. Summer Graduate School Mathematics of Machine Learning

    Organizers: Sebastien Bubeck (Microsoft Research), Anna Karlin (University of Washington), Adith Swaminathan (Microsoft Research)
    Image
    Popular visualization of the MNIST dataset

    Learning theory is a rich field at the intersection of statistics, probability, computer science, and optimization. Over the last decades the statistical learning approach has been successfully applied to many problems of great interest, such as bioinformatics, computer vision, speech processing, robotics, and information retrieval. These impressive successes relied crucially on the mathematical foundation of statistical learning.

    Recently, deep neural networks have demonstrated stunning empirical results across many applications like vision, natural language processing, and reinforcement learning. The field is now booming with new mathematical problems, and in particular, the challenge of providing theoretical foundations for deep learning techniques is still largely open. On the other hand, learning theory already has a rich history, with many beautiful connections to various areas of mathematics (e.g., probability theory, high dimensional geometry, game theory). The purpose of the summer school is to introduce graduate students (and advanced undergraduates) to these foundational results, as well as to expose them to the new and exciting modern challenges that arise in deep learning and reinforcement learning.

    Updated on Aug 01, 2019 10:00 AM PDT
  19. Summer Graduate School Recent topics on well-posedness and stability of incompressible fluid and related topics

    Organizers: LEAD Yoshikazu Giga (University of Tokyo), Maria Schonbek (University of California, Santa Cruz), Tsuyoshi Yoneda (University of Tokyo)
    Image
    Fluid-flow stream function color-coded by vorticity in 3D flat torus calculated by K. Nakai (The University of Tokyo)

    The purpose of the workshop is to introduce graduate students to fundamental results on the Navier-Stokes and the Euler equations, with special emphasis on the solvability of its initial value problem with rough initial data as well as the large time behavior of a solution. These topics have long research history. However, recent studies clarify the problems from a broad point of view, not only from analysis but also from detailed studies of orbit of the flow.

    Updated on Aug 19, 2019 04:17 PM PDT
  20. Summer Graduate School Polynomial Method

    Organizers: Adam Sheffer (Bernard M. Baruch College, CUNY), LEAD Joshua Zahl (University of British Columbia)
    Twolines3d
    from distinct distances in the plane to line incidences in R^3

    In the past eight years, a number of longstanding open problems in combinatorics were resolved using a new set of algebraic techniques. In this summer school, we will discuss these new techniques as well as some exciting recent developments.

    Updated on Jul 12, 2019 03:36 PM PDT
  21. Summer Graduate School Séminaire de Mathématiques Supérieures 2019: Current trends in Symplectic Topology

    Organizers: Octav Cornea (Université de Montréal), Yakov Eliashberg (Stanford University), Michael Hutchings (University of California, Berkeley), Egor Shelukhin (Université de Montréal)
    Image
    A Holomorphic Curve

    Symplectic topology is a fast developing branch of geometry that has seen phenomenal growth in the last twenty years. This two weeks long summer school, organized in the setting of the Séminaire de Mathématiques Supérieures, intends to survey some of the key directions of development in the subject today thus covering: advances in homological mirror symmetry; applications to hamiltonian dynamics; persistent homology phenomena; implications of flexibility and the dichotomy flexibility/rigidity; legendrian contact homology; embedded contact homology and four-dimensional holomorphic techniques and others. With the collaboration of many of the top researchers in the field today, the school intends to serve as an introduction and guideline to students and young researchers who are interested in accessing this diverse subject. 

    Updated on Dec 10, 2018 04:21 PM PST
  22. Summer Graduate School Geometric Group Theory

    Organizers: LEAD Rita Jiménez Rolland (Instituto de Matematicás, UNAM-Oaxaca), LEAD Pierre Py (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México)
    Image
    Rips's δ-thin triangle condition for Gromov hyperbolicity of metric spaces (Stomatapoll)

    Geometric group theory studies discrete groups by understanding the connections between algebraic properties of these groups and topological and geometric properties of the spaces on which they act. The aim of this summer school is to  introduce graduate students to specific central topics and recent developments in geometric group theory. The school will also include students presentations to give the participants an opportunity to practice their speaking skills in mathematics.  Finally, we hope that this meeting will help connect Latin American students with their American and Canadian counterparts in an environment that encourages discussion and collaboration. 

    Updated on Jul 03, 2019 11:35 AM PDT
  23. Summer Graduate School Representation stability

    Organizers: Thomas Church (Stanford University), LEAD Andrew Snowden (University of Michigan), Jenny Wilson (University of Michigan)
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    An illustration of an adaptation of Quillen's classical homological stability spectral sequence argument

    This summer school will give an introduction to representation stability, the study of algebraic structural properties and stability phenomena exhibited by sequences of representations of finite or classical groups -- including sequences arising in connection to hyperplane arrangements, configuration spaces, mapping class groups, arithmetic groups, classical representation theory, Deligne categories, and twisted commutative algebras.  Representation stability incorporates tools from commutative algebra, category theory, representation theory, algebraic combinatorics, algebraic geometry, and algebraic topology. This workshop will assume minimal prerequisites, and students in varied disciplines are encouraged to apply. 

    Updated on Jul 03, 2019 03:47 PM PDT
  24. MSRI-UP MSRI-UP 2019: Combinatorics and Discrete Mathematics

    Organizers: Federico Ardila (San Francisco State University), Duane Cooper (Morehouse College), Maria Franco (Queensborough Community College (CUNY); MSRI - Mathematical Sciences Research Institute), LEAD Rebecca Garcia (Sam Houston State University), Pamela Harris (Williams College), Suzanne Weekes (Worcester Polytechnic Institute)

    The MSRI-UP summer program is designed to serve a diverse group of undergraduate students who would like to conduct research in the mathematical sciences.

    In 2019, MSRI-Up will focus on the application of combinatorial arguments and techniques to enumerate, examine, and investigate the existence of discrete mathematical structures with certain properties. The areas of interest for these applications encompass a wide range of mathematical fields and will include algebra, number theory, and graph theory, through weight multiplicity computations, the study of vector partition functions, and graph domination problems, respectively. The research program will be led by Dr. Pamela E. Harris, Assistant Professor of Mathematics at Williams College.

    Updated on Jul 22, 2020 02:54 PM PDT
  25. Summer Graduate School Random and arithmetic structures in topology

    Organizers: LEAD Alexander Furman (University of Illinois at Chicago), Tsachik Gelander (Weizmann Institute of Science)
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    The study of locally symmetric manifolds, such as closed hyperbolic manifolds, involves geometry of the corresponding symmetric space, topology of towers of its finite covers, and number-theoretic aspects that are relevant to possible constructions.
    The workshop will provide an introduction to these and closely related topics such as lattices, invariant random subgroups, and homological methods.

    Updated on Jul 09, 2019 08:17 AM PDT
  26. Workshop Improving the Preparation of Graduate Students to Teach Undergraduate Mathematics

    Organizers: Jack Bookman (Duke University), Shandy Hauk (San Francisco State University), LEAD Dave Kung (St. Mary's College of Maryland), LEAD Natasha Speer (University of Maine)

    Is your department interested in helping graduate students learn to teach? Perhaps your department is considering starting a teaching-focused professional development program. Or maybe your department has a program but is interested in updating and enhancing it.

    Many departments now offer pre-semester orientations, semester-long seminars, and other opportunities for graduate students who are new to teaching so they will be well-equipped to provide high-quality instruction to undergraduates. The purpose of this workshop is to support faculty from departments that are considering starting a teaching-focused professional development program or, for departments that have a program, to learn ways to improve it.

    Updated on Mar 04, 2019 04:57 PM PST
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