Logo

Mathematical Sciences Research Institute

Home > Scientific > Programs > Upcoming Programs

Upcoming Programs

  1. New Geometric Methods in Number Theory and Automorphic Forms

    Organizers: Pierre Colmez (L'Institut de Mathématiques de Jussieu), LEAD Wee Teck Gan (National University of Singapore), Michael Harris (L'Institut de Mathématiques de Jussieu), Elena Mantovan (California Institute of Technology), Ariane Mezard (L'Institut de Mathématiques de Jussieu), Akshay Venkatesh (Stanford University)

    The branches of number theory most directly related to the arithmetic of automorphic forms have seen much recent progress, with the resolution of many longstanding conjectures. These breakthroughs have largely been achieved by the discovery of new geometric techniques and insights. The goal of this program is to highlight new geometric structures and new questions of a geometric nature which seem most crucial for further development. In particular, the program will emphasize geometric questions arising in the study of Shimura varieties, the p-adic Langlands program, and periods of automorphic forms.

    Updated on Oct 11, 2013 02:02 PM PDT
  2. Geometric Representation Theory

    Organizers: LEAD David Ben-Zvi (University of Texas), Ngô Bảo Châu (University of Chicago), Thomas Haines (University of Maryland), Florian Herzig (University of Toronto), Kevin McGerty (University of Oxford), David Nadler (University of California, Berkeley), Catharina Stroppel (Hausdorff Research Institute for Mathematics, University of Bonn), Eva Viehmann (TU München)

    The fundamental aims of geometric representation theory are to uncover the deeper geometric and categorical structures underlying the familiar objects of representation theory and harmonic analysis, and to apply the resulting insights to the resolution of classical problems. One of the main sources of inspiration for the field is the Langlands philosophy, a vast nonabelian generalization of the Fourier transform of classical harmonic analysis, which serves as a visionary roadmap for the subject and places it at the heart of number theory. A primary goal of the proposed MSRI program is to explore the potential impact of geometric methods and ideas in the Langlands program by bringing together researchers working in the diverse areas impacted by the Langlands philosophy, with a particular emphasis on representation theory over local fields.

    Another focus comes from theoretical physics, where new perspectives on the central objects of geometric representation theory arise in the study supersymmetric gauge theory, integrable systems and topological string theory. The impact of these ideas is only beginning to be absorbed and the program will provide a forum for their dissemination and development.

    Updated on Aug 12, 2013 03:02 PM PDT
  3. Dynamics on Moduli Spaces of Geometric Structures

    Organizers: Richard Canary (University of Michigan), William Goldman (University of Maryland), François Labourie (Université Paris-Sud (Orsay)), LEAD Howard Masur (University of Chicago), Anna Wienhard (Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg)

    The program will focus on the deformation theory of geometric structures on manifolds, and the resulting geometry and dynamics. This subject is formally a subfield of differential geometry and topology, with a heavy infusion of Lie theory. Its richness stems from close relations to dynamical systems, algebraic geometry, representation theory, Lie theory, partial differential equations, number theory, and complex analysis.

    Updated on Jul 29, 2013 03:58 PM PDT
  4. Geometric and Arithmetic Aspects of Homogeneous Dynamics

    Organizers: LEAD Dmitry Kleinbock (Brandeis University), Elon Lindenstrauss (Hebrew University), Hee Oh (Yale University), Jean-François Quint (University de Bordeaux 1), Alireza Salehi Golsefidy (University of California, San Diego)

    Homogeneous dynamics is the study of asymptotic properties of the action of subgroups of Lie groups on their homogeneous spaces. This includes many classical examples of dynamical systems, such as linear Anosov diffeomorphisms of tori and geodesic flows on negatively curved manifolds. This topic is related to many branches of mathematics, in particular, number theory and geometry. Some directions to be explored in this program include: measure rigidity of multidimensional diagonal groups; effectivization, sparse equidistribution and sieving; random walks, stationary measures and stiff actions; ergodic theory of thin groups; measure classification in positive characteristic. It is a companion program to “Dynamics on moduli spaces of geometric structures”.

    Updated on Oct 11, 2013 02:07 PM PDT
  5. New Challenges in PDE: Deterministic Dynamics and Randomness in High and Infinite Dimensional Systems

    Organizers: Kay Kirkpatrick (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), Yvan Martel (École Polytechnique), Jonathan Mattingly (Duke University), Andrea Nahmod (University of Massachusetts, Amherst), Pierre Raphael (Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis), Luc Rey-Bellet (University of Massachusetts, Amherst), LEAD Gigliola Staffilani (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Daniel Tataru (University of California, Berkeley)

    The fundamental aim of this program is to bring together a core group of mathematicians from the general communities of nonlinear dispersive and stochastic partial differential equations whose research contains an underlying and unifying problem: quantitatively analyzing the dynamics of solutions arising from the flows generated by deterministic and non-deterministic evolution differential equations, or dynamical evolution of large physical systems, and in various regimes. 

    In recent years there has been spectacular progress within both communities in the understanding of this common problem. The main efforts exercised, so far mostly in parallel, have generated an incredible number of deep results, that are not just beautiful mathematically, but are  also important to understand the complex natural phenomena around us.  Yet, many open questions and challenges remain ahead of us. Hosting the proposed program at MSRI would be the most effective venue to explore the specific questions at the core of the unifying theme and to have a focused and open exchange of ideas, connections and mathematical tools leading to potential new paradigms.  This special program will undoubtedly produce new and fundamental results in both areas, and possibly be the start of a new generation of researchers comfortable on both languages.

    Updated on Dec 23, 2013 08:59 AM PST
  6. Differential Geometry

    Organizers: Tobias Colding (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Simon Donaldson (Imperial College, London), John Lott (University of California, Berkeley), Natasa Sesum (Rutgers University), Gang Tian (Princeton University), LEAD Jeff Viaclovsky (University of Wisconsin)

    Differential geometry is a subject with both deep roots and recent advances. Many old problems in the field have recently been solved, such as the Poincaré and geometrization conjectures by Perelman, the quarter pinching conjecture by Brendle-Schoen, the Lawson Conjecture by Brendle, and the Willmore Conjecture by Marques-Neves. The solutions of these problems have introduced a wealth of new techniques into the field. This semester-long program will focus on the following main themes:
    (1) Einstein metrics and generalizations,
    (2) Complex differential geometry,
    (3) Spaces with curvature bounded from below,
    (4) Geometric flows,
    and particularly on the deep connections between these areas.

    Updated on Jan 03, 2014 04:22 PM PST
  7. Geometric Group Theory

    Organizers: Ian Agol (University of California, Berkeley), Mladen Bestvina (University of Utah), Cornelia Drutu (University of Oxford), Mark Feighn (Rutgers University), Michah Sageev (Technion---Israel Institute of Technology), LEAD Karen Vogtmann (Cornell University)

    The field of geometric group theory emerged from Gromov’s insight that even mathematical objects such as groups, which are defined completely in algebraic terms, can be profitably viewed as geometric objects and studied with geometric techniques Contemporary geometric group theory has broadened its scope considerably, but retains this basic philosophy of reformulating in geometric terms problems from diverse areas of mathematics and then solving them with a variety of tools. The growing list of areas where this general approach has been successful includes
    low-dimensional topology, the theory of manifolds, algebraic topology, complex dynamics, combinatorial group theory, algebra, logic, the study of various classical families of groups, Riemannian geometry and representation theory.


    The goals of this MSRI program are to bring together people from the various branches of the field in order to consolidate recent progress, chart new directions, and train the next generation of geometric group theorists.

    Updated on Oct 11, 2013 02:11 PM PDT