Mathematical Sciences Research Institute

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Upcoming Programs

  1. Differential Geometry

    Organizers: Tobias Colding (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Simon Donaldson (Imperial College, London), John Lott (University of California, Berkeley), Natasa Sesum (Rutgers University), Gang Tian (Princeton University), LEAD Jeff Viaclovsky (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

    Differential geometry is a subject with both deep roots and recent advances. Many old problems in the field have recently been solved, such as the Poincaré and geometrization conjectures by Perelman, the quarter pinching conjecture by Brendle-Schoen, the Lawson Conjecture by Brendle, and the Willmore Conjecture by Marques-Neves. The solutions of these problems have introduced a wealth of new techniques into the field. This semester-long program will focus on the following main themes:
    (1) Einstein metrics and generalizations,
    (2) Complex differential geometry,
    (3) Spaces with curvature bounded from below,
    (4) Geometric flows,
    and particularly on the deep connections between these areas.

    Updated on Apr 21, 2015 03:40 PM PDT
  2. Geometric Group Theory

    Organizers: Ian Agol (University of California, Berkeley), Mladen Bestvina (University of Utah), Cornelia Drutu (University of Oxford), LEAD Mark Feighn (Rutgers University), Michah Sageev (Technion---Israel Institute of Technology), Karen Vogtmann (Cornell University)

    The field of geometric group theory emerged from Gromov’s insight that even mathematical objects such as groups, which are defined completely in algebraic terms, can be profitably viewed as geometric objects and studied with geometric techniques Contemporary geometric group theory has broadened its scope considerably, but retains this basic philosophy of reformulating in geometric terms problems from diverse areas of mathematics and then solving them with a variety of tools. The growing list of areas where this general approach has been successful includes low-dimensional topology, the theory of manifolds, algebraic topology, complex dynamics, combinatorial group theory, algebra, logic, the study of various classical families of groups, Riemannian geometry and representation theory.

    The goals of this MSRI program are to bring together people from the various branches of the field in order to consolidate recent progress, chart new directions, and train the next generation of geometric group theorists.

    Updated on Jul 15, 2015 10:57 AM PDT
  3. Analytic Number Theory

    Organizers: Chantal David (Concordia University), Andrew Granville (Université de Montréal), Emmanuel Kowalski (ETH Zuerich), Philippe Michel (École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL)), Kannan Soundararajan (Stanford University), LEAD Terence Tao (University of California, Los Angeles)

    Analytic number theory, and its applications and interactions, are currently experiencing intensive progress, in sometimes unexpected directions. In recent years, many important classical questions have seen spectacular advances based on new techniques; conversely, methods developed in analytic number theory have led to the solution of striking problems in other fields.

    This program will not only give the leading researchers in the area further opportunities to work together, but more importantly give young people the occasion to learn about these topics, and to give them the tools to achieve the next breakthroughs.

    Updated on Jul 10, 2015 03:54 PM PDT
  4. Harmonic Analysis

    Organizers: LEAD Michael Christ (University of California, Berkeley), Allan Greenleaf (University of Rochester), Steven Hofmann (University of Missouri), LEAD Michael Lacey (Georgia Institute of Technology), Svitlana Mayboroda (University of Minnesota, Twin Cities), Betsy Stovall (University of Wisconsin-Madison), Brian Street (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

    The field of Harmonic Analysis dates back to the 19th century, and has its roots in the study of the decomposition of functions using Fourier series and the Fourier transform.  In recent decades, the subject has undergone a rapid diversification and expansion, though the decomposition of functions and operators into simpler parts remains a central tool and theme.  
    This program will bring together researchers representing the breadth of modern Harmonic Analysis and will seek to capitalize on and continue recent progress in four major directions:
         -Restriction, Kakeya, and Geometric Incidence Problems
         -Analysis on Nonhomogeneous Spaces
         -Weighted Norm Inequalities
         -Quantitative Rectifiability and Elliptic PDE.
    Many of these areas draw techniques from or have applications to other fields of mathematics, such as analytic number theory, partial differential equations, combinatorics, and geometric measure theory.  In particular, we expect a lively interaction with the concurrent program.  

    Updated on Oct 06, 2015 07:56 PM PDT
  5. Geometric Functional Analysis and Applications

    Organizers: Franck Barthe (Universite Paul Sabatier--Toulouse III), Marianna Csornyei (University of Chicago), Boaz Klartag (Tel Aviv University), Alexander Koldobsky (University of Missouri), Rafal Latala (University of Warsaw), LEAD Mark Rudelson (University of Michigan)

    Geometric functional analysis lies at the interface of convex geometry, functional analysis and probability. It has numerous applications ranging from geometry of numbers and random matrices in pure mathematics to geometric tomography and signal processing in engineering and numerical optimization and learning theory in computer science.

    One of the directions of the program is classical convex geometry, with emphasis on connections with geometric tomography, the study of geometric properties of convex bodies based on information about their sections and projections. Methods of harmonic analysis play an important role here. A closely related direction is asymptotic geometric analysis studying geometric properties of high dimensional objects and normed spaces, especially asymptotics of their quantitative parameters as dimension tends to infinity. The main tools here are concentration of measure and related probabilistic results. Ideas developed in geometric functional analysis have led to progress in several areas of applied mathematics and computer science, including compressed sensing and random matrix methods. These applications as well as the problems coming from computer science will be also emphasised in our program.

    Updated on Jun 02, 2015 01:17 PM PDT
  6. Geometric and Topological Combinatorics

    Organizers: Jesus De Loera (University of California, Davis), Vic Reiner (University of Minnesota Twin Cities), LEAD Francisco Santos (University of Cantabria), Francis Su (Harvey Mudd College), Rekha Thomas (University of Washington), Günter M. Ziegler (Freie Universität Berlin)

    Combinatorics is one of the fastest growing areas in contemporary Mathematics, and much of this growth is due to the connections and interactions with other areas of Mathematics. This program is devoted to the very vibrant and active area of interaction between Combinatorics with Geometry and Topology. That is, we focus on (1) the study of the combinatorial properties or structure of geometric and topological objects and (2) the development of geometric and topological techniques to answer combinatorial problems.

    Key examples of geometric objects with intricate combinatorial structure are point configurations and matroids, hyperplane and subspace arrangements, polytopes and polyhedra, lattices, convex bodies, and sphere packings. Examples of topology in action answering combinatorial challenges are the by now classical Lovász’s solution of the Kneser conjecture, which yielded functorial approaches to graph coloring, and the  more recent, extensive topological machinery leading to breakthroughs on Tverberg-type problems.

    Updated on Sep 15, 2015 02:18 PM PDT
  7. Group Representation Theory and Applications

    Organizers: Robert Guralnick (University of Southern California), Alexander (Sasha) Kleshchev (University of Oregon), Gunter Malle (Universität Kaiserslautern), Gabriel Navarro (University of Valencia), Julia Pevtsova (University of Washington), Raphael Rouquier (University of California, Los Angeles), LEAD Pham Tiep (University of Arizona)

    Group Representation Theory is a central area of Algebra, with important and deep connections to areas as varied as topology, algebraic geometry, number theory, Lie theory, homological algebra, and mathematical physics. Born more than a century ago, the area still abounds with basic problems and fundamental conjectures, some of which have been open for over five decades. Very recent breakthroughs have led to the hope that some of these conjectures can finally be settled. In turn, recent results in group representation theory have helped achieve substantial progress in a vast number of applications.

    The goal of the program is to investigate all these deep problems and the wealth of new results and directions, to obtain major progress in the area, and to explore further applications of group representation theory to other branches of mathematics.

    Updated on Apr 10, 2015 02:52 PM PDT
  8. Enumerative Geometry Beyond Numbers

    Organizers: Mina Aganagic (University of California, Berkeley), Denis Auroux (University of California, Berkeley), Jim Bryan, LEAD Andrei Okounkov (Columbia University), Balazs Szendroi (University of Oxford)

    Traditional enumerative geometry asks certain questions to which the expected answer is a number: for instance, the number of lines incident with two points in the plane (1, Euclid), or the number of twisted cubic curves on a quintic threefold (317 206 375). It has however been recognized for some time that the numerics is often just the tip of the iceberg: a deeper exploration reveals interesting geometric, topological, representation-, or knot-theoretic structures. This semester-long program will be devoted to these hidden structures behind enumerative invariants, concentrating on the core fields where these questions start: algebraic and symplectic geometry.

    Updated on Oct 12, 2015 03:39 PM PDT