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  1. [Moved Online] Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2020: Today’s Mathematics, Social Justice, and Implications for Schools

    Organizers: Meredith Broussard (New York Unviersity), Victor Donnay (Bryn Mawr College), Courtney Ginsberg (Math for America), Luis Leyva (Vanderbilt University), Candice Price (Smith College), Chris Rasmussen (San Diego State University), LEAD Katherine Stevenson (California State University, Northridge), William Tate (Washington University in St. Louis)

    On Aril 10 portions of the Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2020: Today’s Mathematics, Social Justice, and Implications for Schools workshop will be streamed online via Zoom. Only the talks below will are scheduled at this time.  Further talks may be scheduled at a later date, and you will be notified when we know more.


    Friday 4/10: 12pm PST (3pm eastern time)

    12:00 - 1:00 Estrella Johnson, Some unintended consequences of active learning

     

    A formal Notice of Change letter is available here, which can be shared with your institution, funding agency, and others.

     


    Updated on Apr 09, 2020 09:00 AM PDT
  2. [Moved Online] Hot Topics: Optimal transport and applications to machine learning and statistics

    Organizers: Luigi Ambrosio (Scuola Normale Superiore), Francis Bach (École Normale Supérieure), LEAD Katy Craig (University of California, Santa Barbara), Carola-Bibiane Schönlieb (University of Cambridge), Stefano Soatto (University of California, Los Angeles)
    Image
    Image drawn by Dr. Katy Craig


    ***Due to the COVID-19 virus outbreak, the 2020 Hot Topics: Optimal transport and applications to machine learning and statistic workshop will no longer be held onsite at MSRI, rather it will take place online from May 4-8 as scheduled***

    All on-site programming at MSRI in Berkeley is cancelled. **Please DO NOT TRAVEL to Berkeley / MSRI for this event.


    Workshop Description:
    The goal of the workshop is to explore the many emerging connections between the theory of Optimal Transport and models and algorithms currently used in the Machine Learning community. In particular, the use of Wasserstein metrics and the relation between discrete models and their continuous counterparts will be presented and discussed.

    Updated on Mar 18, 2020 10:37 AM PDT
  3. Combinatorial and DG-Algebra Techniques for Free Resolutions (Tianjin, China)

    Organizers: Chengming Bai (Chern Institute of Mathematics), LEAD Dave Bayer (Columbia University), Claudia Miller (Syracuse University)
    2020 sgs combinatorial and dg algebra techniques nankai proposal bayer.2019.01.06 %285%29 page 1
    A cellular resolution of the real projective plan

    The two topics, combinatorial theory of free resolutions and differential graded algebra techniques in homological algebra, each have a long and rich history in commutative algebra and its applications to algebraic geometry. Free resolutions are at the center of much of the study in the field and these two approaches give powerful tools for their study and their application to other problems. Neither of these topics is generally covered in graduate courses. Furthermore, recent developments have exhibited exciting interplay between the two subjects. The purpose of the school is to introduce the graduate students to these subjects and these new developments. The school will consist of two lectures each day and carefully planned problem sessions designed to reinforce the foundational material and to give them a chance to experiment with problems involving the interplay between the two subjects.

    Updated on Jul 26, 2019 03:43 PM PDT
  4. MSRI-UP 2020: Branched Covers of Curves

    Organizers: Federico Ardila (San Francisco State University), LEAD Duane Cooper (Morehouse College), Maria Franco (Queensborough Community College (CUNY); MSRI - Mathematical Sciences Research Institute), Rebecca Garcia (Sam Houston State University), Edray Goins (Pomona College), Suzanne Weekes (Worcester Polytechnic Institute)

    The MSRI-UP summer program is designed to serve a diverse group of undergraduate students who would like to conduct research in the mathematical sciences.

    In 2020, MSRI-Up will focus on Branched Covers of Curves. The research program will be led by Dr. Edray Goins, Professor of Mathematics at Pomona College.

    Updated on Dec 10, 2019 09:18 AM PST
  5. Geometric Flows (Athens, Greece)

    Organizers: Nicholas Alikakos (National and Kapodistrian University of Athens (University of Athens)), Panagiota Daskalopoulos (Columbia University)
    Image
    photo courtesy of Panagiota Daskalopoulos

    [The image on this vase from Minoan Crete, dated on 1500-2000 BC, resembles an ancient solution to the Curve shortening flow - one of the most basic geometric flows. The vase is at Heraklion Archaeological Museum]

    This summer graduate school is a collabroation between MSRI and the FORTH-IACM Institute in Crete. The purpose of the school is to introduce graduate students to some of the most important geometric evolution equations. 

    This is an area of geometric analysis that lies at the interface of differential geometry and partial differential equations. The lectures will begin with an introduction to nonlinear diffusion equations and continue with  classical results on the Ricci Flow, the  Mean curvature flow and other fully non-linear extrinsic flows such as the Gauss curvature flow.  The lectures will also include   geometric applications such as isoperimetric inequalities, topological applications such as the Poincaré onjecture,  as well as recent important developments related to the study of singularities and ancient solutions.

    Updated on Jan 23, 2020 12:15 PM PST
  6. Algebraic Theory of Differential and Difference Equations, Model Theory and their Applications

    Organizers: LEAD Alexey Ovchinnikov (Queens College, CUNY), Anand Pillay (University of Notre Dame), Thomas Scanlon (University of California, Berkeley), Michael Wibmer (University of Notre Dame)
    Image
    Algebraic Theory Of Differential And Difference Equations, Model Theory And Their Applications

    The purpose of the summer school will be to introduce graduate students to effective methods in algebraic theories of differential and difference equations with emphasis on their model-theoretic foundations and to demonstrate recent applications of these techniques to studying dynamic models arising in sciences. While these topics comprise a coherent and rich subject, they appear in graduate coursework in at best a piecemeal way, and then only as components of classes for other aims. With this Summer Graduate School, students will learn both the theoretical basis of differential and difference algebra and how to use these methods to solve practical problems. Beyond the lectures, the graduate students will meet daily in problem sessions and will participate in one-on-one mentoring sessions with the lecturers and organizers.

    Updated on Jan 16, 2020 11:37 AM PST
  7. New Directions in Representation Theory (AMSI, Brisbane, Australia)

    Organizers: Tim Brown (Australian Mathematical Sciences Institute), Joseph Grotowski (University of Queensland), Chloe Pearse (Australian Mathematical Sciences Institute), Jacqui Ramagge (University of Sydney), Ole Warnaar (University of Queensland), Geordie Williamson (University of Sydney)

    Representation Theory has undergone a revolution in recent years, with the development of what is now known as higher representation theory. In particular, the notion of categorification has led to the resolution of many problems previously considered to be intractable.

    The school will begin by providing students with a brief but thorough introduction to what could be termed the “bread and butter of modern representation theory”, i.e., compact Lie groups and their representation theory; character theory; structure theory of algebraic groups.

    We will then continue on to a number of more specialized topics. The final mix will depend on discussions with the prospective lecturers, but we envisage such topics as:

    • modular representation theory of finite groups (blocks, defect groups, Broué’s conjecture);

    • perverse sheaves and the geometric Satake correspondence;

    • the representation theory of real Lie groups.

    Updated on Aug 08, 2019 09:36 AM PDT
  8. Random Graphs

    Organizers: Louigi Addario-Berry (McGill University), Remco van der Hofstad (Technische Universiteit Eindhoven)
    2020 sgs random graphs proposal hofsatd.2018.12
    by DeDelphin Sénizergues

    The topic of random graphs is at the forefront of applied probability, and it is one of the central topics in multidisciplinary science where mathematical ideas are used to model and understand the real world. At the same time, random graphs pose challenging mathematical problems that have attracted the attention from probabilists and combinatorialists since the 1960, with the pioneering work of Erdös and Rényi. Around the turn of the millennium, very large data sets started to become available, and several applied disciplines started to realize that many real-world networks, even though they are from various different origins, share many fascinating features. In particular, many of such networks are small worlds, meaning that graph distances in them are typically quite small, and they are scalefree, in the sense that there are enormous differences in the number of connections that their elements make. In particular, such networks are quite different from the classical random graph models, such as proposed by Erdös and Rényi.

    Updated on Jul 26, 2019 03:40 PM PDT
  9. Séminaire de Mathématiques Supérieures 2020: Discrete Probability, Physics and Algorithms (Montréal, Canada)

    Organizers: Gerard Ben Arous (New York University, Courant Institute), LEAD Alexander Fribergh (University of Montreal), Lea Popovic (Concordia University)
    Image

    Probability theory, statistics as well as mathematical physics have increasingly been used in computer science. The goal of this school is to provide a unique opportunity for graduate students and young researchers to developed multi-disciplinary skills in a rapidly evolving area of mathematics.

    The topics would include spin glasses, constraint satisfiability, randomized algorithms, Monte-Carlo Markov chains and high-dimensional statistics, sparse and random graphs, computational complexity, estimation and approximation algorithms. Those topics will fall into two main categories, on the one hand problems related to spin glasses and on the other hand random algorithms.

    The part of the summer school dedicated to spin glasses will be split into three parts: an introductory course about traditional spin glasses followed by two more advanced courses where spin glasses meet computer science in addition to a talk on dynamics of spin glasses. The part of the summer school on random algorithms will consist of an introductory course on phase transitions in large random structures, followed by advanced courses on theoretical bounds for computational complexity in reconstruction and inference, and on understanding rare events in random graphs and models of statistical mechanics.

    The two introductory courses on spin glasses and on random algorithms will be accompanied by three exercises sessions of one hour. A one hour exercises session will follow each of the three sessions of a course for both the introductory course on spin glasses and the introductory course on random algorithms. Exercises sessions will be led by an assistant, but will primarily focus on participation of the students.

    Updated on Feb 20, 2020 01:37 PM PST
  10. Algebraic Curves (Hainan, China)

    Organizers: David Eisenbud (MSRI - Mathematical Sciences Research Institute), Joseph Harris (Harvard University)
    Image rev2
    Illustration generously provided by Herwig Hauser

    [Image: The simplest interesting case of linkage (liaison) of curves in projective 3-space. We see two quadric surfaces, one of which is a cone, meeting in the union of a line (vertical in the illustration)  and a twisted cubic (snaking up from the bottom left to the upper right, tangent to the line at the origin.]

    The theory of algebraic curves, arguably the oldest branch of algebraic geometry, has seen major developments in recent years, for example in the study of syzygies, and around questions about moduli spaces and Hilbert schemes of curves. The theory is rich in research activity and unsolved problems. There is an encyclopedic work by Arbarello, Cornalba, Griffiths and Harris, but there is no modern text that could be used as a textbook and that goes beyond the basics of the theory. We have embarked on a project to write a book at roughly the level of the wonderful book on complex algebraic surfaces by Arnaud Beauville. The intent can be seen from a list of some major topics it will treat:

    • Linear series and Brill-Noether theory
    • Personalities: curves in projective space with low genus and degree
    • Overview of moduli and Jacobians
    • Hilbert schemes
    • Syzygies and linkage

    The school will have two series of lectures, one by Harris and one by Eisenbud. Harris’ lectures will focus on the more geometric side of the theory, including Brill-Noether theory, families of curves and Jacobians; while Eisenbud’s lectures will focus on the more algebraic side of the theory, including properties of the homogeneous coordinate rings of curves (Cohen-Macaulay, Gorenstein, free resolutions, scrolls, ...) Both lecturers will rely on chapters from the forthcoming book, which should be finished in large part by the time of the school. In addition, some of Eisenbud’s lectures will treat the use of Macaulay2 to investigate the projective embeddings of curves.

    Updated on Aug 14, 2019 03:45 PM PDT
  11. Foundations and Frontiers of Probabilistic Proofs (Zurich, Switzerland)

    Organizers: Alessandro Chiesa (University of California, Berkeley), Tom Gur (University of Warwick)
    Proofs main logo
    Several executions of a 3-dimensional sumcheck protocol with a random order of directions (thanks to Dev Ojha for creating the diagram)

    Proofs are at the foundations of mathematics. Viewed through the lens of theoretical computer science, verifying the correctness of a mathematical proof is a fundamental computational task. Indeed, the P versus NP problem, which deals precisely with the complexity of proof verification, is one of the most important open problems in all of mathematics.

    The complexity-theoretic study of proof verification has led to exciting reenvisionings of mathematical proofs. For example, probabilistically checkable proofs (PCPs) admit local-to-global structure that allows verifying a proof by reading only a minuscule portion of it. As another example, interactive proofs allow for verification via a conversation between a prover and a verifier, instead of the traditional static sequence of logical statements. The study of such proof systems has drawn upon deep mathematical tools to derive numerous applications to the theory of computation and beyond.

    In recent years, such probabilistic proofs received much attention due to a new motivation, delegation of computation, which is the emphasis of this summer school. This paradigm admits ultra-fast protocols that allow one party to check the correctness of the computation performed by another, untrusted, party. These protocols have even been realized within recently-deployed technology, for example, as part of cryptographic constructions known as succinct non-interactive arguments of knowledge (SNARKs).

    This summer school will provide an introduction to the field of probabilistic proofs and the beautiful mathematics behind it, as well as prepare students for conducting cutting-edge research in this area.

    Updated on Feb 29, 2020 10:41 AM PST
  12. Metric Geometry and Geometric Analysis (Oxford, United Kingdom)

    Organizers: LEAD Cornelia Drutu (University of Oxford), Panos Papazoglou (University of Oxford)

    The purpose of the summer school is to introduce graduate students to key mainstream directions in the recent development of geometry, which sprang from Riemannian Geometry in an attempt to use its methods in various contexts of non-smooth geometry. This concerns recent developments in metric generalizations of the theory of nonpositively curved spaces and discretizations of methods in geometry, geometric measure theory and global analysis. The metric geometry perspective gave rise to new results and problems in Riemannian Geometry as well.

    All these themes are intertwined and have developed either together or greatly influencing one another. The summer school will introduce some of the latest developments and the remaining open problems in these very modern areas, and will emphasize their synergy.

     

    Updated on Jul 31, 2019 11:07 AM PDT
  13. Sums of Squares Method in Geometry, Combinatorics and Optimization

    Organizers: LEAD Grigoriy Blekherman (Georgia Institute of Technology), Annie Raymond (University of Massachusetts Amherst), Rekha Thomas (University of Washington)
    Image
    Graph of the Motzkin polynomial, which is nonnegative but not a sum of squares.

    The study of nonnegative polynomials and sums of squares is a classical area of real algebraic geometry dating back to Hilbert’s 17th problem. It also has rich connections to real analysis via duality and moment problems. In the last 15 years, sums of squares relaxations have found a wide array of applications from very applied areas (e.g., robotics, computer vision, and machine learning) to theoretical applications (e.g., extremal combinatorics, theoretical computer science). Also, an intimate connection between sums of squares and classical algebraic geometry has been found. Work in this area requires a blend of ideas and techniques from algebraic geometry, convex geometry and representation theory. After an introduction to nonnegative polynomials, sums of squares and semidefinite optimization, we will focus on the following three topics:

    • Sums of squares on real varieties (sets defined by real polynomial equations) and connections with classical algebraic geometry.
    • Sums of squares method for proving graph density inequalities in extremal combinatorics. Here addition and multiplication take place in the gluing algebra of partially labelled graphs.
    • Sums of squares relaxations for convex hulls of real varieties and theta-bodies with applications in optimization.

    The summer school will give a self-contained introduction aimed at beginning graduate students, and introduce participants to the latest developments. In addition to attending the lectures, students will meet in intensive problem and discussion sessions that will explore and extend the topics developed in the lectures.

    Updated on Jul 26, 2019 03:40 PM PDT
  14. Introduction to water waves

    Organizers: Mihaela Ifrim (University of Wisconsin-Madison), Daniel Tataru (University of California, Berkeley)
    Img 6168
    Overturning wave, artistic drawing by E. Ifrim

    The purpose of this two weeks school is to introduce graduate students to the state of the art methods and results in the study of incompressible Euler’s equations in general, and water waves in particular. This is a research area which is highly relevant to many real life problems, and in which substantial progress has been made in the last decade.

     

    The goal is to present the main current research directions in water waves. We will begin with the physical derivation of the equations, and present some of the analytic tools needed in study. The final goal will be two-fold, namely (i) to understand the local solvability of the Cauchy problem for water waves, as well as (ii) to describe the long time behavior of solutions.

    Through the lectures and associated problem sessions, students will learn about a number of new analysis tools which are not routinely taught in a graduate school curriculum. The goal is to help students acquire the knowledge needed in order to start research in water waves and Euler equations.

    Updated on Jul 26, 2019 03:40 PM PDT
  15. Connections Workshop: Decidability, definability and computability in number theory

    Organizers: LEAD Valentina Harizanov (George Washington University), David Marker (University of Illinois, Chicago), Russell Miller (Queens College, CUNY; CUNY, Graduate Center), Jennifer Park (Ohio State University), Alexandra Shlapentokh (East Carolina University)
    Image edited
    Title page of Diophantus' Arithmetica - ETH Zurich

    The aim of the workshop is to discover how the problems in number theory and algebraic geometry arising from the Hilbert’s tenth problem for rationals interact with the ideas and techniques in mathematical logic, such as definability from model theory and decidability and degree-theoretic complexity from computability theory. This interaction includes various analogues of Hilbert’s tenth problem and related questions, focusing on the connections of algebraic, number-theoretic, model-theoretic, and computability-theoretic properties of structures and objects in algebraic number theory, anabelian geometry, field arithmetic, and differential algebra.

    Updated on Mar 04, 2020 11:46 AM PST
  16. Introductory Workshop: Decidability, definability and computability in number theory

    Organizers: Maryanthe Malliaris (University of Chicago), Russell Miller (Queens College, CUNY; CUNY, Graduate Center), LEAD Jonathan Pila (University of Oxford), Alexandra Shlapentokh (East Carolina University)
    Image edited
    Title page of Diophantus' Arithmetica - ETH Zurich

    Our workshop will focus research efforts on the interaction of number-theoretic questions with questions of decidability, definability, and computability, bringing together researchers approaching these questions from various sides to work on the core issues. This Introductory Workshop will serve as the introductory event of the MSRI semester program and is designed to introduce the basic structures and ideas of the different communities, and to highlight problems of active current interest.

    Updated on Apr 23, 2019 01:30 PM PDT
  17. Connections Workshop: Random and Arithmetic Structures in Topology

    Organizers: LEAD Ursula Hamenstädt (Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn), LEAD Fanny Kassel (Institut des Hautes Études Scientifiques (IHES))
    Msri image

    This two-day workshop will consist of various talks given by prominent female mathematicians in the field.  These will be appropriate for graduate students, post-docs, and researchers in areas related to the program.  The workshop will also include a professional development session.

    This workshop is open to all mathematicians.

    Updated on Feb 13, 2020 05:01 PM PST
  18. Introductory Workshop: Random and Arithmetic Structures in Topology

    Organizers: Jeffrey Brock (Yale University), Michelle Bucher (Université de Genève), LEAD Alan Reid (Rice University)
    Msri image
    Geometry, Topology and Arithmeticity

    The use of dynamical invariants has long been a staple of geometry and topology, from rigidity theorems, to classification theorems, to the general study of lattices and of the mapping class group. More recently, random structures in topology and notions of probabilistic geometric convergence have played a critical role in  
    testing the robustness of conjectures in the arithmetic setting.

    In this introductory workshop, we will bring together junior and senior researchers in order to provide a mix of introductory lectures as well as reporting on more recent progress in topics from this diverse range of subjects.

    Updated on Jun 17, 2019 08:13 AM PDT
  19. Structure and randomness in locally symmetric spaces

    Organizers: Nicolas Bergeron (École Normale Supérieure), Lewis Bowen (University of Texas, Austin), Yizhaq Gelander (Weizmann Institute of Science), LEAD Alan Reid (Rice University), Abigail Thompson (University of California, Davis)
    Bianchi 010
    Structure in a locally symmetric space by Jos Leys

    The study of discrete subgroups of Lie groups and the associated locally symmetric manifolds has a long and rich history, with powerful interconnections between the geometry of the locally symmetric space, topology of towers of its finite covers, and number-theoretic aspects. More recently dynamical and probabilistic techniques have been fruitfully employed to study these groups and spaces.  The workshop will take stock of recent developments in these highly active fields from a variety of backgrounds.

    Updated on Jun 06, 2019 09:08 AM PDT
  20. Topical Workshop: Decidability, definability and computability in number theory

    Organizers: Julia Knight (University of Notre Dame), François Loeser (Université de Paris VI (Pierre et Marie Curie)), Maryanthe Malliaris (University of Chicago), LEAD Thomas Scanlon (University of California, Berkeley)
    Image edited
    Title page of Diophantus' Arithmetica - ETH Zurich

    The conference will focus broadly on interactions of problems in number theory with definability from model theory and decidability from computability theory. This is the final program conference for our semester and will serve to showcase significant recent work in the area including the developments during the program.  We hope the conference will also provide an occasion to reflect on the key future directions and open problems in this emerging area, and thus to direct the momentum of the semester towards future work.

    Updated on Mar 04, 2020 11:39 AM PST
  21. Connections Workshop: Mathematical problems in fluid dynamics

    Organizers: Hajer Bhouri (Université Paris-Est Créteil Val-de-Marne; Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS)), Juhi Jang (University of Southern California), LEAD Anna Mazzucato (Pennsylvania State University), Sijue Wu (University of Michigan)
    Image
    Image by Noomann Bassou

    This workshop will feature talks by prominent female mathematicians whose research lies in and interfaces with mathematical fluids featuring water waves,  free boundaries, fluid structures,  viscous fluids and turbulence. The talks will be appropriate for graduate students, post-docs, and researchers in areas above mentioned. There will also be a panel discussion and a contributed poster session. This workshop is open to all mathematicians.

    Updated on Feb 20, 2020 11:31 AM PST
  22. Introductory Workshop: Mathematical problems in fluid dynamics

    Organizers: Nicolas Burq (Université de Paris XI), Anne-Laure Dalibard (Université de Paris VI (Pierre et Marie Curie)), Jean Marc Delort (Université de Paris XIII (Paris-Nord)), LEAD Mihaela Ifrim (University of Wisconsin-Madison), Irena Lasiecka (University of Memphis), Vladimir Sverak (University of Minnesota Twin Cities)
    945 image

    The workshop will address topics in the PDE analysis of the basic equations of the incompressible fluid dynamics (the Euler equations for inviscid flows, the Navier Stokes equations for viscous flows), interface problems (water waves), and other related equations. Open problems and connections to related branches of mathematics will be discussed, including the phenomena of turbulence and the zero viscosity limit. Both theoretical and numerical aspects of these topics will be considered. There will be some colloquium style lectures as well as shorter research talks. The workshop is open to all.

    Updated on Nov 25, 2019 01:09 PM PST
  23. Recent Developments in Fluid Dynamics

    Organizers: Thomas Alazard (Ecole Normale Supérieure Paris-Saclay; Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS)), Hajer Bhouri (Université Paris-Est Créteil Val-de-Marne; Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS)), Mihaela Ifrim (University of Wisconsin-Madison), Igor Kukavica (University of Southern California), David Lannes (Université de Bordeaux I; Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS)), LEAD Daniel Tataru (University of California, Berkeley)
    Valuri
    Water waves

    The aim of the workshop is to bring together a broad array of researchers working on incompressible fluid dynamics. Some of the key topics to be covered are Euler flows, Navier Stokes equations as well as water wave flows and associated model equations. Some emphasis will also be placed on numerical analysis of the above evolutions.

    Updated on Jun 18, 2019 09:54 AM PDT
  24. Hot Topics: Topological Insights in Neuroscience

    Organizers: Carina Curto (Pennsylvania State University), Chad Giusti (University of Delaware), LEAD Kathryn Hess (École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL)), Ran Levi (University of Aberdeen)
    2020 21 topological insights neuroscience image hess.2019.02.27
    Image created by Nicolas Antille, of the visualization team of the Blue Brain Project at EPFL

    The talks in this workshop will present a wide array of current applications of topology in neuroscience, including classification and synthesis of neuron morphologies, analysis of synaptic plasticity, algebraic analysis of the neural code, topological analysis of neural networks and their dynamics, topological decoding of neural activity, diagnosis of traumatic brain injuries, and topological biomarkers for psychiatric disease. Some of the talks will be devoted to promising new directions in algebraic topology that have been inspired by neuroscience.

    Updated on Nov 27, 2019 01:57 PM PST
  25. Introductory Workshop: Universality and Integrability in Random Matrix Theory and Interacting Particle Systems

    Organizers: Gerard Ben Arous (New York University, Courant Institute), Alice Guionnet (École Normale Supérieure de Lyon), Sylvia Serfaty (New York University, Courant Institute), Horng-Tzer Yau (Harvard University)

    The introductory workshop aims at providing participants with an overview of some of the recent developments in the topics of the semester, with a particular emphasis on universality and applications. This includes universality for Wigner matrices and band matrices and quantum unique ergodicity, universality for beta ensembles and log/coulomb gases, KPZ universality class, universality in interacting particle systems, the connection between random matrices and number theory.

    Updated on Mar 19, 2020 11:30 AM PDT
  26. Integrable structures in random matrix theory and beyond

    Organizers: LEAD Jinho Baik (University of Michigan), Alexei Borodin (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Tamara Grava (University of Bristol; SISSA), Alexander Its (Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis), Sandrine Péché (Université de Paris VII (Denis Diderot))
    Image
    Image by Alexei Borodin.

    This workshop will focus on the integrable aspect of random matrix theory and other related probability models such as random tilings, directed polymers, and interacting particle systems. The emphasis is on communicating diverse algebraic structures in these areas which allow the asymptotic analysis possible. Some of such structures are determinantal point processes, Toeplitz and Hankel determinants, Bethe ansatz, Yang-Baxter equation, Karlin-McGregor formula, Macdonald process, and stochastic six vertex model.

    Updated on Jul 31, 2019 03:22 PM PDT

Past all workshops

  1. Workshop {Moved Online] Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2020: Today’s Mathematics, Social Justice, and Implications for Schools

    Organizers: Meredith Broussard (New York Unviersity), Victor Donnay (Bryn Mawr College), Courtney Ginsberg (Math for America), Luis Leyva (Vanderbilt University), Candice Price (Smith College), Chris Rasmussen (San Diego State University), LEAD Katherine Stevenson (California State University, Northridge), William Tate (Washington University in St. Louis)

    On March 27, a portion of the Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2020: Today’s Mathematics, Social Justice, and Implications for Schools workshop will be streamed online via Zoom. Further talks may be scheduled at a later date, and you will be notified when we know more.

    Please see the schedule below and the link for the Zoom call.

    Friday 3/27: Starting at 12pm PST (3pm eastern time)

    12:00p - 1:00p
    Nicol Turner Lee, Brookings Inst., Center for Tech Innov. -  Unconscious Bias
    Saber Khan, Processing Foundation, leader of #EthicalCS -  Identity & Ethics

    https://msri.zoom.us/j/727516524
    Join by phone:
    US: +1 669 900 6833 or +1 346 248 7799
        Webinar ID: 727 516 524

     

    A formal Notice of Change letter is available here, which can be shared with your institution, funding agency, and others.

     


    Updated on Apr 09, 2020 08:51 AM PDT
  2. Workshop [Moved Online] (∞, n)-categories, factorization homology, and algebraic K-theory

    Organizers: LEAD Clark Barwick (University of Edinburgh), David Gepner (University of Melbourne), David Nadler (University of California, Berkeley), Marcy Robertson (University of Melbourne)
    Image

    The link to this online workshop is: https://msri.zoom.us/j/999860976

    This workshop will focus on recent developments in factorization homology, parametrized homotopy theory, and algebraic K-theory.  These seemingly disparate topics are unified by a common methodology, which leverages universal properties and unforeseen descent by way of higher category theory. Furthermore, they enjoy powerful and complementary roles in application to the cyclotomic trace.  This workshop will be a venue for experts in these areas to present new results, make substantive connections across fields, and suggest and contextualize outstanding questions and problems.  It will consist of 4 two-part lecture series and 10 one-hour talks. The lecture series will be given by Thomas Nikolaus, Akhil Mathew, David Ben-Zvi and a split Martina Rovelli and Viktoriya Ozornova.

     


    Updated on Mar 20, 2020 03:42 PM PDT
  3. Workshop [Moved Online] Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2020: Today’s Mathematics, Social Justice, and Implications for Schools

    Organizers: Meredith Broussard (New York Unviersity), Victor Donnay (Bryn Mawr College), Courtney Ginsberg (Math for America), Luis Leyva (Vanderbilt University), Candice Price (Smith College), Chris Rasmussen (San Diego State University), LEAD Katherine Stevenson (California State University, Northridge), William Tate (Washington University in St. Louis)

    On March 20, a portion of the Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2020: Today’s Mathematics, Social Justice, and Implications for Schools workshop will be streamed online via Zoom. Further talks may be scheduled at a later date, and you will be notified when we know more.

    Please see the schedule below and the link for the Zoom call.

    Friday 3/20: Starting at 12pm PST (3pm eastern time)

    12:00p - 12:45p Lisa Goldberg, Hot Hands: What Data Science Can (and Can't) Tell Us About Basketball Trends
    12:45p - 1:00p Discussion with Lisa and Kate on: What Bayes tells us about our ability to reason about randomness 
    https://msri.zoom.us/j/719968313
    Join by phone:
    US: +1 669 900 6833 or +1 346 248 7799
        Webinar ID: 719 968 313

     

    A formal Notice of Change letter is available here, which can be shared with your institution, funding agency, and others.

     


    Updated on Mar 23, 2020 02:18 PM PDT
  4. Workshop [Moved Online] Tensor categories and topological quantum field theories

    Organizers: Scott Morrison (Australian National University), Eric Rowell (Texas A & M University), LEAD Claudia Scheimbauer (TU München), Christopher Schommer-Pries (University of Notre Dame)
    Image
    Topological field theory studies the interplay of algebraic and topological structure (image credit Kevin Walker)

    Link to stream workshop: https://msri.zoom.us/j/226801541

    ***Due to the COVID-19 virus outbreak, the 2020 Tensor categories and topological quantum field theories workshop will no longer be held onsite at MSRI, rather it will take place online from March 16-20 as scheduled***

    The decision to move this workshop online is based on the available scientific data on COVID-19, and the strong advice from experts to avoid gatherings of large groups.

     

    A formal Notice of Change letter is available here, which can be shared with your institution, funding agency, and others.

     


    Updated on Mar 13, 2020 04:52 PM PDT
  5. Workshop [Moved Online] Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2020: Today’s Mathematics, Social Justice, and Implications for Schools

    Organizers: Meredith Broussard (New York Unviersity), Victor Donnay (Bryn Mawr College), Courtney Ginsberg (Math for America), Luis Leyva (Vanderbilt University), Candice Price (Smith College), Chris Rasmussen (San Diego State University), LEAD Katherine Stevenson (California State University, Northridge), William Tate (Washington University in St. Louis)

     

    On March 12 and March 13, portions of the Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2020: Today’s Mathematics, Social Justice, and Implications for Schools workshop will be streamed online via Zoom. Only the talks below will are scheduled at this time.  Further talks may be scheduled at a later date, and you will be notified when we know more.

    Please see the schedule below, as well as links to the two sessions.

    Thursday 3/12: Starting at 9am PST (noon eastern time)

    9:00 - 9:10 Welcoming remarks
    9:10 - 9:15 Introduction to CIME 2020 plan and speaker David Daley
    9:15 - 9:55 David Daley, Why Your Vote Doesn't Count
    9:55 - 10:00 Kate Stevenson, introduction of activity
    10:00-10:30 Mathical Book Prize Announcement
    https://msri.zoom.us/j/833010028
    Join by phone:
    US: +1 669 900 6833 or +1 929 436 2866
    Webinar ID: 833 010 028


    Friday 3/13: Starting at 9am PST (noon eastern time)
    9:00 - 9:05 Introduction of speaker Wesley Pegden
    9:05 - 9:45 Wesley Pegden, Bringing Mathematics to the Courtroom
    9:45 - 10:00 Q&A
    https://msri.zoom.us/j/359902928
    Join by phone:
    US: +1 669 900 6833 or +1 929 436 2866
    Webinar ID: 359 902 928

    A formal Notice of Change letter is available here, which can be shared with your institution, funding agency, and others.

     


    Updated on Mar 11, 2020 03:46 PM PDT
  6. Workshop Introductory Workshop: Higher Categories and Categorification

    Organizers: LEAD David Ayala (Montana State University), Emily Riehl (Johns Hopkins University), Christopher Schommer-Pries (University of Notre Dame), Peter Teichner (Max-Planck-Institut für Mathematik)
    Image
    relations among 2-morphisms in the 2-dimensional unoriented bordism bicategory

    This workshop will survey notable developments and applications of higher category theory; it will be a venue for end-users to share their vision of how to apply the theory, as well as developers to share technical advancements.  It will consist of 6 series of 3 lectures, each given by instrumental end-users & developers of higher category theory, together with a few question-answer sessions.  Each lecture series will be tailored to a diverse audience, accessible to graduate students and non-expert researchers with some background in homological also algebra.  The content of these lecture series will concern the following topics.

    • K-theory: categorification, non-commutative motives, trace methods; 
    • TQFT: functorial field theories, factorization homology.
    • Parametrized higher category theory: stratifications, equivariant homotopy theory, operads, deformation theory and Koszul duality. 
    • Synthetic higher category theory: model-independent characterizations, cosmoi.  

    Updated on Feb 13, 2020 11:18 AM PST
  7. Workshop Connections for Women: Higher Categories and Categorification

    Organizers: Emily Riehl (Johns Hopkins University), LEAD Marcy Robertson (University of Melbourne)
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    Picture of a Feynman graph.

    This two-day workshop will survey notable developments in the foundations and applications of higher category theory. It will consist of two mini-courses given by emerging female leaders in the subject: Claudia Scheimbauer and Nathalie Wahl.  This will be paired with a problem sessions lead by selected "TA's", themselves experts in higher structures.  Each lecture series will be tailored to a diverse audience, accessible to graduate students and non-expert researchers with some background in homological algebra.  

    The majority of the speakers and panelists for this event will be women and gender minorities, and members of these groups and of other underrepresented groups are especially encouraged to attend. This workshop is open to all mathematicians.

    Updated on Feb 07, 2020 11:01 AM PST
  8. Workshop Introductory Workshop: Quantum Symmetries

    Organizers: Vaughan Jones (Vanderbilt University), Victor Ostrik (University of Oregon), Emily Peters (Loyola University), LEAD Noah Snyder (Indiana University)
    Jellyfish
    Jellyfish floating to the surface, as in the evaluation algorithm for certain planar algebras.

    This workshop will consist of introductory minicourses on key topics in Quantum Symmetry: fusion categories, modular tensor categories, Hopf algebras, subfactors and planar algebras, topological field theories, conformal nets, and topological phases of matter.  These minicourses will be introductory and are aimed at giving semester participants exposure to the main ideas of subfields other than their own.

    Updated on Jan 30, 2020 10:47 AM PST
  9. Workshop Connections for Women: Quantum Symmetries

    Organizers: Emily Peters (Loyola University), LEAD Chelsea Walton (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)
    Cfw image
    Photo by drmakete lab on Unsplash

    This workshop will feature several talks by experts, along with numerous 5-minute presentations by junior mathematicians, on topics related to Quantum Symmetry. Such topics will include tensor categories, subfactors, Hopf algebras, topological quantum field theory and more. There will also be a panel discussion on professional development. The majority of the speakers and panelists for this event will be women and gender minorities, and members of these groups and of other underrepresented groups are especially encouraged to attend. This workshop is open to all mathematicians.

    Updated on Jan 30, 2020 10:47 AM PST
  10. Workshop Symposium in Honor of Julia Robinson’s 100th Birthday

    Organizers: Hélène Barcelo (MSRI - Mathematical Sciences Research Institute), Thomas Scanlon (University of California, Berkeley), Carol Wood (Wesleyan University)

    MSRI will host a Symposium on the occasion of Julia Robinson’s 100th birthday on Monday, December 9, 2019 at MSRI. Julia Robinson (1919-1985) was an internationally renowned logician of the twentieth century. She was a trailblazer in mathematics as well as in many other ways: she was the first woman president of the American Mathematical Society, and the first woman mathematician elected to membership in the National Academy of Sciences.

    Participating speakers in this day-long celebration of her work and of current mathematics insprired by her research include: Martin Davis, Kirsten Eisentrager, Yuri Matiyasevich, and  Lou van den Dries. Following the symposium, Lenore Blum will give a public lecture at UC Berkeley.

    Updated on Nov 22, 2019 03:54 PM PST
  11. Workshop Holomorphic Differentials in Mathematics and Physics

    Organizers: LEAD Jayadev Athreya (University of Washington), Steven Bradlow (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), Sergei Gukov (California Institute of Technology), Andrew Neitzke (Yale University), Laura Schaposnik (University of Illinois at Chicago), Gabriela Weitze-Schmithuesen (Universität des Saarlandes), Anton Zorich (Institut de Mathematiques de Jussieu)
    Sn image
    An example of a spectral network associated to the group SL(4).

    Holomorphic differentials on Riemann surfaces have long held a distinguished place in low dimensional geometry, dynamics and representation theory. Recently it has become apparent that they constitute a common feature of several other highly active areas of current research in mathematics and also at the interface with physics. In some cases the areas themselves (such as stability conditions on Fukaya-type categories, links to quantum integrable systems, or the physically derived construction of so-called spectral networks) are new, while in others the novelty lies more in the role of the holomorphic differentials (for example in the study of billiards in polygons, special - Hitchin or higher Teichmuller - components of representation varieties, asymptotic properties of Higgs bundle moduli spaces, or in new interactions with algebraic geometry).

    It is remarkable how widely scattered are the motivating questions in these areas, and how diverse are the backgrounds of the researchers pursuing them. Bringing together experts in this wide variety of fields to explore common interests and discover unexpected connections is the main goal of our program. Our workshop will be of interest to those working in many different fields, including low-dimensional dynamical systems (via the connection to billiards); differential geometry (Higgs bundles and related moduli spaces); and different types of theoretical physics (electron transport and supersymmetric quantum field theory).

    Updated on Nov 21, 2019 10:44 AM PST
  12. Workshop Modern Math Workshop 2019

    Organizers: Sudipta Dasmohapatra (Duke University ), Christian Ratsch (University of California, Los Angeles; Institute of Pure and Applied Mathematics (IPAM)), Michael Singer (MSRI - Mathematical Sciences Research Institute), Ulrica Wilson (Morehouse College; Institute for Computational and Experimental Research in Mathematics (ICERM))
    Mmw2016

    As part of the Mathematical Sciences Collaborative Diversity Initiatives, six mathematics institutes are pleased to host their annual SACNAS pre-conference event, the 2019 Modern Math Workshop (MMW). The Modern Math Workshop is intended to encourage minority undergraduates to pursue careers in the mathematical sciences and to assist undergraduates, graduate students and recent PhDs in building their research networks.

    Updated on Dec 18, 2019 02:42 PM PST
  13. Workshop Berlekamp Memorial Workshop on Combinatorial Games

    Organizers: Svenja Huntemann (Carleton University), Richard Nowakowski (Dalhousie University), Aaron Siegel (Airbnb)
    Content berlekamp web image

    Elwyn Berlekamp (1937-2019) was a pioneering contributor to combinatorial game theory, greatly advancing the subject over the course of a more than five-decade career. Along with his coauthors, John Conway and Richard Guy, Berlekamp invented the modern form of the theory, with the publication of Winning Ways for Your Mathematical Plays in 1982. His later work substantially advanced our understanding of the mathematical structure of well-known games such as Go, Amazons, and Dots-and-Boxes. More information about his life can be found at www.msri.org/elwyn.


    This workshop will be an informal two-day mini-conference honoring Berlekamp's work and the subject he helped create. The event will consist of talks, afternoon workshops, and a combinatorial games tournament.

    Updated on Aug 28, 2019 06:09 PM PDT
  14. Workshop Recent developments in microlocal analysis

    Organizers: LEAD Pierre Albin (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), Nalini Anantharaman (Université de Strasbourg), Colin Guillarmou (Université de Paris XI (Paris-Sud))
    315 image1

    Microlocal analysis provides tools for the precise analysis of problems arising in areas such as partial differential equations or integral geometry by working in the phase space, i.e. the cotangent bundle, of the underlying manifold. It has origins in areas such as quantum mechanics and hyperbolic equations, in addition to the development of a general PDE theory, and has expanded tremendously over the last 40 years to the analysis of singular spaces, integral geometry, nonlinear equations, scattering theory, hyperbolic dynamical systems, probability… As this description shows microlocal analysis has become a very broad area. Due to its breadth, it is a challenge for researchers to be aware of what is happening in other parts of the field, and the impact this may have in their own research area. The purpose of this workshop is thus to bring together researchers from different parts of microlocal analysis and its applications to facilitate the transfer of new ideas. 

    Updated on Dec 05, 2019 10:59 AM PST
  15. Workshop Neural Theories of Cognition

    Organizers: David Eisenbud (MSRI - Mathematical Sciences Research Institute), Adrienne Fairhall (University of Washington), John Maunsell (University of Chicago), Bruno Olshausen (University of California, Berkeley)

    The objective of the meeting is to bring theorists and theoretically-motivated experimentalists together to discuss promising theoretical frameworks for understanding cognitive processes and how these may be brought to bear on interpreting neural data or formulating new experiments. We hope that this meeting will be a chance to discuss future goals for theory in neuroscience: what are missing areas and emerging approaches that might help the field to make real progress in developing theories of brain function.

    Updated on Feb 27, 2020 04:25 PM PST
  16. Workshop Introductory Workshop: Microlocal Analysis

    Organizers: Pierre Albin (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), LEAD Raluca Felea (Rochester Institute of Technology), Andras Vasy (Stanford University)
    315 image1

    Microlocal analysis provides tools for the precise analysis of problems arising in areas such as partial differential equations or integral geometry by working in the phase space, i.e. the cotangent bundle, of the underlying manifold. It has origins in areas such as quantum mechanics and hyperbolic equations, in addition to the development of a general PDE theory, and has expanded tremendously over the last 40 years to the analysis of singular spaces, integral geometry, nonlinear equations, scattering theory… This workshop will provide a comprehensive introduction to the field for postdocs and graduate students as well as specialists outside the field, building up from standard facts about the Fourier transform, distributions and basic functional analysis.

    Updated on Sep 05, 2019 01:10 PM PDT
  17. Workshop Connections for Women: Microlocal Analysis

    Organizers: Tanya Christiansen (University of Missouri), LEAD Raluca Felea (Rochester Institute of Technology)
    315 image1

    This workshop will provide a gentle introduction to a selection of applications of microlocal analysis.  These may be drawn from among geometric microlocal analysis, inverse problems, scattering theory, hyperbolic dynamical systems,  quantum chaos and relativity.  The workshop will also provide  a panel discussion, a poster session and an introduction/research session. 

    This workshop is open to all mathematicians.

    Updated on Sep 24, 2019 09:45 AM PDT
  18. Workshop Introductory Workshop: Holomorphic Differentials in Mathematics and Physics

    Organizers: LEAD Jayadev Athreya (University of Washington), Sergei Gukov (California Institute of Technology), Andrew Neitzke (Yale University), Anna Wienhard (Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg)
    Quadmesh2
    Some holomorphic differentials on a genus 2 surface, with close up views of singular points, image courtesy Jian Jiang.

    Holomorphic differentials on Riemann surfaces have long held a distinguished place in low dimensional geometry, dynamics and representation theory. Recently it has become apparent that they constitute a common feature of several other highly active areas of current research in mathematics and also at the interface with physics. In this introductory workshop, we will bring junior and senior researchers from this diverse range of subjects together in order to explore common themes and unexpected connections.

    Updated on Aug 22, 2019 10:50 AM PDT
  19. Workshop Connections for Women: Holomorphic Differentials in Mathematics and Physics

    Organizers: Laura Fredrickson (Stanford University), Lotte Hollands (Heriot-Watt University, Riccarton Campus), LEAD Qiongling Li (Chern Institute of Mathematics), Anna Wienhard (Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg), Grace Work (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
    Quadmesh2
    Some holomorphic differentials on a genus 2 surface, with close up views of singular points, image courtesy Jian Jiang.

    This two-day workshop will consist of various talks given by prominent female mathematicians on topics of new developments in the role of holomorphic differentials on Riemann surfaces. These will be appropriate for graduate students, post-docs, and researchers in areas related to the program.  

    This workshop is open to all mathematicians.

    Updated on Sep 24, 2019 09:48 AM PDT
  20. Summer Graduate School Toric Varieties (National Center for Theoretical Sciences, Taipei)

    Organizers: David Cox (Amherst College), Henry Schenck (Auburn University)
    Firstchoice cropped
    This simplicial fan in 3-dimensional space

    Toric varieties are algebraic varieties defined by combinatorial data, and there is a wonderful interplay between algebra, combinatorics and geometry involved in their study. Many of the key concepts of abstract algebraic geometry (for example, constructing a variety by gluing affine pieces) have very concrete interpretations in the toric case, making toric varieties an ideal tool for introducing students to abstruse concepts.

    Updated on Aug 08, 2019 09:27 AM PDT
  21. Summer Graduate School Mathematics of Machine Learning

    Organizers: Sebastien Bubeck (Microsoft Research), Anna Karlin (University of Washington), Adith Swaminathan (Microsoft Research)
    Image
    Popular visualization of the MNIST dataset

    Learning theory is a rich field at the intersection of statistics, probability, computer science, and optimization. Over the last decades the statistical learning approach has been successfully applied to many problems of great interest, such as bioinformatics, computer vision, speech processing, robotics, and information retrieval. These impressive successes relied crucially on the mathematical foundation of statistical learning.

    Recently, deep neural networks have demonstrated stunning empirical results across many applications like vision, natural language processing, and reinforcement learning. The field is now booming with new mathematical problems, and in particular, the challenge of providing theoretical foundations for deep learning techniques is still largely open. On the other hand, learning theory already has a rich history, with many beautiful connections to various areas of mathematics (e.g., probability theory, high dimensional geometry, game theory). The purpose of the summer school is to introduce graduate students (and advanced undergraduates) to these foundational results, as well as to expose them to the new and exciting modern challenges that arise in deep learning and reinforcement learning.

    Updated on Aug 01, 2019 10:00 AM PDT
  22. Summer Graduate School H-Principle (INdAM, Cortona, Italy)

    Organizers: LEAD Emmy Murphy (Northwestern University), Takashi Tsuboi (University of Tokyo)
    072 04 small
    The image of a large sphere isometrically embedded into a small space through a C^1 embedding. (Attributions: E. Bartzos, V. Borrelli, R. Denis, F. Lazarus, D. Rohmer, B. Thibert)

    This two week summer school will introduce graduate students to the theory of h-principles.  After building up the theory from basic smooth topology, we will focus on more recent developments of the theory, particularly applications to symplectic and contact geometry, fluid dynamics, and foliation theory.

    Updated on Aug 08, 2019 09:31 AM PDT
  23. Summer Graduate School Recent topics on well-posedness and stability of incompressible fluid and related topics

    Organizers: LEAD Yoshikazu Giga (University of Tokyo), Maria Schonbek (University of California, Santa Cruz), Tsuyoshi Yoneda (University of Tokyo)
    Image
    Fluid-flow stream function color-coded by vorticity in 3D flat torus calculated by K. Nakai (The University of Tokyo)

    The purpose of the workshop is to introduce graduate students to fundamental results on the Navier-Stokes and the Euler equations, with special emphasis on the solvability of its initial value problem with rough initial data as well as the large time behavior of a solution. These topics have long research history. However, recent studies clarify the problems from a broad point of view, not only from analysis but also from detailed studies of orbit of the flow.

    Updated on Aug 19, 2019 04:17 PM PDT
  24. Summer Graduate School Polynomial Method

    Organizers: Adam Sheffer (Bernard M. Baruch College, CUNY), LEAD Joshua Zahl (University of British Columbia)
    Twolines3d
    from distinct distances in the plane to line incidences in R^3

    In the past eight years, a number of longstanding open problems in combinatorics were resolved using a new set of algebraic techniques. In this summer school, we will discuss these new techniques as well as some exciting recent developments.

    Updated on Jul 12, 2019 03:36 PM PDT
  25. Summer Graduate School Séminaire de Mathématiques Supérieures 2019: Current trends in Symplectic Topology

    Organizers: Octav Cornea (Université de Montréal), Yakov Eliashberg (Stanford University), Michael Hutchings (University of California, Berkeley), Egor Shelukhin (Université de Montréal)
    Image
    A Holomorphic Curve

    Symplectic topology is a fast developing branch of geometry that has seen phenomenal growth in the last twenty years. This two weeks long summer school, organized in the setting of the Séminaire de Mathématiques Supérieures, intends to survey some of the key directions of development in the subject today thus covering: advances in homological mirror symmetry; applications to hamiltonian dynamics; persistent homology phenomena; implications of flexibility and the dichotomy flexibility/rigidity; legendrian contact homology; embedded contact homology and four-dimensional holomorphic techniques and others. With the collaboration of many of the top researchers in the field today, the school intends to serve as an introduction and guideline to students and young researchers who are interested in accessing this diverse subject. 

    Updated on Dec 10, 2018 04:21 PM PST
  26. Summer Graduate School Geometric Group Theory

    Organizers: LEAD Rita Jiménez Rolland (Instituto de Matematicás, UNAM-Oaxaca), LEAD Pierre Py (Instituto de Matematicás, UNAM-Ciudad Universitaria)
    Image
    Rips's δ-thin triangle condition for Gromov hyperbolicity of metric spaces (Stomatapoll)

    Geometric group theory studies discrete groups by understanding the connections between algebraic properties of these groups and topological and geometric properties of the spaces on which they act. The aim of this summer school is to  introduce graduate students to specific central topics and recent developments in geometric group theory. The school will also include students presentations to give the participants an opportunity to practice their speaking skills in mathematics.  Finally, we hope that this meeting will help connect Latin American students with their American and Canadian counterparts in an environment that encourages discussion and collaboration. 

    Updated on Jul 03, 2019 11:35 AM PDT
  27. Summer Graduate School Representation stability

    Organizers: Thomas Church (Stanford University), LEAD Andrew Snowden (University of Michigan), Jenny Wilson (University of Michigan)
    Image
    An illustration of an adaptation of Quillen's classical homological stability spectral sequence argument

    This summer school will give an introduction to representation stability, the study of algebraic structural properties and stability phenomena exhibited by sequences of representations of finite or classical groups -- including sequences arising in connection to hyperplane arrangements, configuration spaces, mapping class groups, arithmetic groups, classical representation theory, Deligne categories, and twisted commutative algebras.  Representation stability incorporates tools from commutative algebra, category theory, representation theory, algebraic combinatorics, algebraic geometry, and algebraic topology. This workshop will assume minimal prerequisites, and students in varied disciplines are encouraged to apply. 

    Updated on Jul 03, 2019 03:47 PM PDT
  28. MSRI-UP MSRI-UP 2019: Combinatorics and Discrete Mathematics

    Organizers: Federico Ardila (San Francisco State University), Duane Cooper (Morehouse College), Maria Franco (Queensborough Community College (CUNY); MSRI - Mathematical Sciences Research Institute), LEAD Rebecca Garcia (Sam Houston State University), Pamela Harris (Williams College), Suzanne Weekes (Worcester Polytechnic Institute)

    The MSRI-UP summer program is designed to serve a diverse group of undergraduate students who would like to conduct research in the mathematical sciences.

    In 2019, MSRI-Up will focus on the application of combinatorial arguments and techniques to enumerate, examine, and investigate the existence of discrete mathematical structures with certain properties. The areas of interest for these applications encompass a wide range of mathematical fields and will include algebra, number theory, and graph theory, through weight multiplicity computations, the study of vector partition functions, and graph domination problems, respectively. The research program will be led by Dr. Pamela E. Harris, Assistant Professor of Mathematics at Williams College.

    Updated on Sep 25, 2019 03:58 PM PDT
  29. Summer Graduate School Random and arithmetic structures in topology

    Organizers: LEAD Alexander Furman (University of Illinois at Chicago), Yizhaq Gelander (Weizmann Institute of Science)
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    The study of locally symmetric manifolds, such as closed hyperbolic manifolds, involves geometry of the corresponding symmetric space, topology of towers of its finite covers, and number-theoretic aspects that are relevant to possible constructions.
    The workshop will provide an introduction to these and closely related topics such as lattices, invariant random subgroups, and homological methods.

    Updated on Jul 09, 2019 08:17 AM PDT
  30. Workshop Improving the Preparation of Graduate Students to Teach Undergraduate Mathematics

    Organizers: Jack Bookman (Duke University), Shandy Hauk (WestEd), LEAD Dave Kung (St. Mary's College of Maryland), LEAD Natasha Speer (University of Maine)

    Is your department interested in helping graduate students learn to teach? Perhaps your department is considering starting a teaching-focused professional development program. Or maybe your department has a program but is interested in updating and enhancing it.

    Many departments now offer pre-semester orientations, semester-long seminars, and other opportunities for graduate students who are new to teaching so they will be well-equipped to provide high-quality instruction to undergraduates. The purpose of this workshop is to support faculty from departments that are considering starting a teaching-focused professional development program or, for departments that have a program, to learn ways to improve it.

    Updated on Mar 04, 2019 04:57 PM PST
There are more then 30 past workshops. Please go to Past workshops to see all past workshops.